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Monday, August 7
 

10:45am

Welcome to the Matrix: Creating Organizational Structures that Effectively Support Agile (Doc List)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Traditional organizations focus on roles and controls. If you're a developer, you probably report to a development manager. If you're QA, you probably report to a QA manager. This can lead to some dysfunctions and challenges when you're on an Agile team. After all, if we embrace the idea that Agile teams are self-organizing, setting their team's work priorities, and communicating openly, what happens when your manager gives you conflicting direction? Who do you give priority to?
Agile companies - or those attempting to be agile - frequently apply traditional organizational structures in ways that can be very counterproductive or ineffective. This is true whether the organization is developing software or streamlining their hiring process or doing financial accounting.
In this session, Doc List shares some real world examples of organizational structures and challenges, and then leads participants in group discussions where participants will categorize their own organization's structures, explore alternatives, and craft a plan for change. You will find yourself thoroughly engaged in individual, pair, and group activities in which you will explore and discuss your own organization's challenges in adopting the agile mindset and practices.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Articulate the ways in which your organization supports or prevents effective agile adoption
  • List some strategies for changing the structure and reporting structure of your organization

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Doc List

Doc List

The Guy, AnotherThought Inc.
I love the interactions between people, the dynamics that impede or encourage high performance, and helping people and teams work through their challenges.


Monday August 7, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
I1

10:45am

To Estimate AND Not To Estimate - going beyond #NoEstimates (Audacious Salonnaire)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
The #NoEstimates debate has been going on for about 5 years and still agilists seem to be at loggerheads. It is one of the few issues that spawns contemptuous remarks on social media. Some people dismiss the idea and see it as as an ultra agile practice that is impractical in the "real world", others deem it a vital part of any Agile environment. It has even inspired a book.
To the impartial observer it seems there are many voices, all with some validity and perhaps some shared underlying goals and concerns. Similar to the debates and disagreements in the workplace.
What would a collaborative solution look like? What answers would be available if we put our heads together instead of butting them against one another? What in fact is the problem we are trying to solve?
We would like to invite you to bring your ideas on #NoEstimates to this session, where we will use a Systems Coaching process known as Deep Democracy to hear not only opposing viewpoints, but all voices of the "system" so that participants can garner more systems intelligence and, eventually, move beyond entrenched positions in the current reality. Let's explore together whether there is a place beyond the seemingly binary decision of "to estimate or not to estimate".

Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A



Monday August 7, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Suwannee 11&12

10:45am

Stalwarts - Ron Jeffries & Chet Hendrickson (Ron Jeffries, Chet Hendrickson)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
People ask questions and we say things that may relate to the questions. (We call this the Simplest Description That Can Possibly Work!)
Ron Jeffries and Chet Hendrickson are two of the original XP developers and have stayed active in the community since the mid-90s. They have a wealth of knowledge around development, Agile, training, mentoring, and delivering quality products. Come challenge them with your best questions about Agile!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Entirely up to the questioners and listeners.


Speakers
avatar for Chet Hendrickson

Chet Hendrickson

Supreme and Ultimate Hyper-Chairman Emeritus, HendricksonXP
RJ

Ron Jeffries

RonJeffries.com


Monday August 7, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Wekiwa 5

2:00pm

The Silence Experiment: Making Products without Words (Part 1) (Audacious Salonnaire, Audacious Salonnaire)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Why do we talk? How useful is it?
Let's make products in silence and find out how talking both benefits and stifles collaboration
What does collaboration really mean?
  • In the first 75 minute period of this Silence Experiment session, participants build prosthetic hands for charity in complete silence, noting down each time they have the urge to speak.
  • In the second 75 minute period, Our salonniere will help us look at what we wanted to say and what happened instead.
We will pay particular attention to re-evaluating our model of collaboration and deep diving on the things people still felt like they wanted to say -- Did they really? What happened when they couldn't? How did that effect the outcome?

Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A



Monday August 7, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Suwannee 11&12

2:00pm

Intentional Architecture: Practices for Sustainable Development and Delivery (Rebecca Wirfs-Brock)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
We'd like to deliver functionality on a regular cadence, but sometimes poor design and technical debt trips us up. Ongoing, sustainable development and delivery of system functionality benefits from explicit attention to architecture. Yet we don't want to slip into old habits, overspecifying things we'll never implement or doing too much design upfront. We need to strike a balance. While being agile, we also want to pay attention to the desired and emergent architecture qualities of our systems. Performance, scalabability, maintainability, or flexibility don't happen by magic.
This session introduces you to several architecture practices that can be picked up individually and adapted to your specific business context. You'll learn about practices for managing architecture work, making it visible, and for incrementally delivering architecture. For example, you might want to want to define a landing zone for key system qualities, giving room to make architectural tradeoffs. Or, you may need to raise awareness of existing architecture debt so that you can plan accordingly. Or you may need to fit in cycles of architecture investigation or innovation in with ongoing delivery of functionality. Or probe your existing system's capabilities through defining quality scenarios for normal and failure/recovery modes.
One set of architecture practices doesn't fit all situations. Come learn some powerful architecture practices that can be independently adopted to address your challenges with architectural complexity, uncertainty, emergent system behavior, and incremental delivery of features and capabilities.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Appreciate explicit attention to architecture and the utility of independent architecture practices
  • Ways to manage and mitigate architecture risk: landing zones, risk reduction backlogs, architecture roadmaps
  • Managing architecture investigation: architecture spikes, innovation spikes, bounded reasearch
  • Making architecture work and progress visible: coloring the backlog, system quality dashboards, system quality scenarios
  • A decision-making framework for "dialing in" explicit architecture practices

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Wirfs-Brock Associates
I'm best known as the "design geek" who invented Responsibility-Driven Design and the xDriven meme (think TDD, BDD, DDD..). I'm keen about team effectiveness, communicating complex requirements, software quality, agile QA, pragmatic TDD, and patterns and practices for architecting... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Wekiwa 7&8

2:00pm

Stalwarts - Stephen Denning (Stephen Denning)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Although the notion of organizational Agile and business Agility covers many variations in managerial practices, the site visits of the SD Learning Consortium revealed a striking convergence around three themes or “laws”:
  • The law of the customer: An obsession with delighting customers by continuously adding value for customers and users, as well as a recognition of the current need to generate instant, intimate, frictionless value at scale.
  • The law of the small team: A presumption that in a volatile, complex, uncertain and ambiguous world, work needs to be disaggregated into small batches and performed by small cross-functional autonomous teams, working iteratively in short cycles in a state of flow, with fast feedback from customers and end-users.
  • The law of the network: The entire firm functions as a fluid interactive network, not merely a top-down bureaucracy with a few teams implementing Agile tools and processes.
Achieving continuous innovation is dependent on an Agile mindset pervading the organization. Pursuit of all three laws is key to sustaining business agility. Individually, none of the observed management practices are new. What is new and different is the way that the management goals, practices and values constitute a coherent and integrated approach to continuous innovation, driven by and lubricated with a pervasive entrepreneurial mindset.
About Steve Denning
Steve Denning is the author of several books on organizational storytelling, including The Leader's Guide to Radical Management (Jossey-Bass, 2010).
Steve is the former Program Director, Knowledge Management at the World Bank. He now works with organizations in the U.S., Europe, Asia and Australia on Agile leadership, innovation and organizational storytelling. His clients have included many Fortune 500 companies.
Steve currently writes a popular column for Forbes.com.
Steve’s innovative work has been recognized world-wide. In November 2000, Steve was named as one of the world’s ten Most Admired Knowledge Leaders (Teleos).
Steve was born and educated in Sydney, Australia. He did a postgraduate degree in law at Oxford University in the U.K. Steve then joined the World Bank where he worked for several decades in many capacities.

Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A


Speakers
avatar for Steve Denning

Steve Denning

Founder, Steve Denning LLC
Steve Denning is the warren Buffett of business communication. He sees things others don’t and is able to explain them so the rest of us can understand. Chip Heath, author of Made to Stick. Steve Denning is a master storyteller, leadership expert and best... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Wekiwa 5

3:45pm

The Silence Experiment: Making Products without Words (Part 2) (Audacious Salonnaire, Audacious Salonnaire)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Why do we talk? How useful is it?
Let's make products in silence and find out how talking both benefits and stifles collaboration
What does collaboration really mean?
  • In the first 75 minute period of this Silence Experiment session, participants build prosthetic hands for charity in complete silence, noting down each time they have the urge to speak.
  • In the second 75 minute period, Our salonniere will help us look at what we wanted to say and what happened instead.
We will pay particular attention to re-evaluating our model of collaboration and deep diving on the things people still felt like they wanted to say -- Did they really? What happened when they couldn't? How did that effect the outcome?

Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A



Monday August 7, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Suwannee 11&12

3:45pm

Enterprise Discovery: From Clouseau to Columbo, Understanding Large Organizations (Thomas Perry, Marcelo Camozzato)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Understanding the enterprise is essential to the success of any enterprise transformation initiative. All too often, consultants are rushed in to implement agile methods without any meaningful understanding of the existing people, processes or culture. Engaging without understanding these important contextual elements is a recipe for failure. There is an alternative that can help lead to more successful outcomes: Organizational Discovery.
Organizational Discovery is a structured process for uncovering the critical elements of the people, process and culture. It goes far beyond the current rather superficial models of "agile assessment" to dig into uncovering meaningful functions and dysfunctions within the enterprise. In this talk we describe the discovery process with different investigation approaches and the pros and cons of each.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the enterprise discovery process
  • Learn different investigation approaches and how and when to use them
  • Discover the kinds of artifacts needed to uncover to maximize engagement success

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Marcelo Camozzato

Marcelo Camozzato

Principal Transformation Consultant, CA Technologies
avatar for Thomas Perry

Thomas Perry

Founder, Thomas Perry LLC
Tom has been working as a transformation agent in software development for over 20 years. He has worked on teams at startup companies, large corporations in the Fortune 100 and the State and Federal Government. His background includes testing, development, project/program management... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
H1

3:45pm

Stalwarts - Dean Leffingwell (Dean Leffingwell)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Dean Leffingwell is a software industry veteran, serial entrepreneur, methodologist and author who has spend his entire career helping software teams meet their goals. He is the creator of the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe), and cofounder of Scaled Agile, Inc., where he serves as Chief Methodologist.
Mr. Leffingwell is always happy to discuss topics in the convergence of the bodies of knowledge around SAFe, Agile development methods, systems thinking and lean product development.

Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A


Speakers
avatar for Dean Leffingwell

Dean Leffingwell

Chief Methodologist, Scaled Agile, Inc.


Monday August 7, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Wekiwa 5
 
Tuesday, August 8
 

9:00am

Polarizing Topics (Audacious Salonnaire, Audacious Salonnaire)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Top-Down vs Grassroots Transformation, Co-Located vs Distributed, Agile Works Everywhere vs Not Here, and others! Bring your polarizing topic to move from Debate to Dialogue
In every domain there are topics whose introduction often signals the end of rational discussion. The Agile domain is no different. These are important topics. “Agreeing to disagree” is just avoiding the issue. We need to recognize when a conversation is in the Brambles and find constructive paths out of the entrenched positions. AND we need to recognize when the conversation is beginning to bear fruit. In this session, Derek and Paul will use methods they’ve discovered to help the participants move from Debate to Dialogue on some polarizing topics.

Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A



Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
Suwannee 11&12

9:00am

LACE - drinking our own champagne (Deema Dajani)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Don't waterfall your agile transformation effort. LACE stands for Lean Agile Center for Excellence, it's your uber group of change agents that shepard your Agile transformation. Whether the transformation is an organization decision, or a grass roots movement, you are going to hit a point where LACE is needed to sustain the change. Stickiness! LACE is one of the critical factors for the more successful enterprise transformations.
This talk is less about "why" you need a LACE, rather it is about the tactical "how". Taking you through an interactive working session, to discover how to establish or evolve your organization's LACE. Attendees will leave with a booklet that they helped co-create during the session. And more importantly, with the inspiration to take action.
What is this based on? Not theory. The speaker implemented this approach in successful large scale transformations in financial services and insurance spaces with groups in the 1000-10,000 people range.

Learning Outcomes:
  • * Back to the lean and agile basics, for the transformation initiative itself. Drinking our own champaign
  • * Leveraging essentials from org change management, and lean agility to structure the LACE team and their work
  • * Primary objective is to give the attendees inspiration and a menu of actions they could consider to evolve their LACE


Speakers

Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
Wekiwa 9&10

9:00am

Stalwarts - Arlo Belshee (Arlo Belshee)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Arlo Belshee is a utterly awesome at writing about himself in the third person. He’s so good at it that you will totally think this was written by someone else, even though it is the usual marketing spew.
Arlo has worked for over two decades as a coder/tester, manager, bookkeeper, team craftsman, salesperson, executive, and coach. He invented lots of things (Promiscuous Pairing, Naked Planning – which you know as Kanban, Read by Refactoring, #ZeroBugs). He…
Wait a minute. You don’t care about any of that. It’s so much marketing pabulum that Arlo would get bored even writing it. If he had to. Which he doesn’t. Because this is totally written by somebody else.
You’re considering this session for a reason. You have some challenge. It seems intractable. You really want someone who will do 2 things:
* Really deeply listen to you and learn your context. * Give some practical, real-world options to try. Stuff not based on theory and hope, but on what has worked in the real world. If that problem is in any of the following domains, then Arlo has probably tried several things and can share what worked:
* Eliminating technical debt. * Ship at will. * Data-driven decision-making. * Creating powerful teams. * Egalitarian business structures and Teal organizations. * Authentic human relationships. * Writing code without writing bugs. And if you can’t tell what you’re in for from this description, then, well, I can’t help you. Whoever I am. (Totally not Arlo.)

Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A


Speakers
avatar for Arlo Belshee

Arlo Belshee

Team Craftsman, Legacy Code Mender, and Rabblerouser, Tableau Software
Arlo helps you change cultures in large organizations. He transitions hundreds or thousands of people at a time to full technical and cultural prowess in a way that sticks. More importantly, Arlo gives your company the ability to change its own culture. He seeks to be the last consultant... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
Wekiwa 5

10:45am

What would it take for us to move from 'technical debt' to 'technical health?' (Part 1) (Audacious Salonniere)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Ward Cunningham introduced the metaphor of technical debt 25 years ago. And yet, 25 years later, many organizations continue to build technical debt more quickly than ever. Why is that? How can we shift the technical conversation to better outcomes for our organizations? And how can we help them see technical health as an enabler for long-term success?
In this session we will explore technical debt and technical health through the lens of real-life stories from participants.
We will start by eliciting technical debt stories from you and other participants. What happened? What impact did technical debt play in the outcomes your organization wanted? Did the notion of technical debt trigger different conversations or actions? What obstacles did you face? How did you overcome them? What challenges remain?
We will then shift the focus to technical health. We will elicit similar stories centred instead on enabling value delivery through technical health. Did the concept of technical health, rather than technical debt, make a difference? In what way? What different outcomes emerged? What insights did you or your organization gain?
We will then dig into systemic forces in our organizations that lead to technical debt. In the stories captured what systemic forces were at play? Was the skill or craftsmanship of the team important? Were there external factors external such as budgeting or hiring policies that had a large impact? How did these factors play out over time? How were you able to dial up the positive factors and deal with the negative ones?
By the end, we plan to have annotated the original stories into a wider view of how technical debt and technical health can impact our organizations. We hope participants will gain deeper insights into how to align technical health with the overall organizational goals to gain more positive outcomes.

Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A



Tuesday August 8, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Suwannee 11&12

10:45am

Investment Optimization with Active Portfolio Management (Chris Espy, Linda Cook)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
What if there was another way to approach portfolio management, one that enabled you to act decisively and quickly when an opportunity arose? With the traditional governance paradigm, your organization is stuck with choices that might have made sense at the outset but didn’t work out in the marketplace. What if you made your investments based on facts rather than luck? What if you placed smaller bets against the House and could fold before you lost too much and up the ante where it was evident you would win? In short, what if you could be Agile in where and when you put your money? That’s the beauty of Active Portfolio Management: it enables you to change with a marketplace constantly in flux.
This workshop acknowledges that Agile contradicts traditional business theory, which leads to ineffectively leveraging what Agile has to offer. Focusing on simple rules for portfolio management, you will learn language about Agile that resonates with executives. To help you activate key concepts in this talk, you will run portfolio optimization activities with time for discussion.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Communicate Agile business value
  • Framework for implementing Agile Portfolio Management
  • Techniques for maximising business investments
  • Simple”rules” for Agile Portfolio Management
  • Practice adjusting plans based on changing business needs

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Linda Cook

Linda Cook

Chief Learning Officer, Project Cooks, LLC
Linda is a recognized technology leader and Agile Transformation expert. She is committed to helping organizations achieve their strategic goals. With over 21 years of experience as an IT executive, Linda offers a unique blend of leadership, innovation, and vision which allows her... Read More →
avatar for Chris Espy

Chris Espy

SolutionsIQ, SolutionsIQ
Chris Espy is a Senior Agile Consultant at SolutionsIQ. He has 28 years in IT product development with 10 years in helping companies adopt better ways of working. Chris is passionate about helping organizations and teams build a continuous improvement culture to effectively and efficiently... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
I4

10:45am

Stalwarts - Kupe Kupersmith (Kupe Kupersmith)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Top buzzwords today almost always include teamwork, collaboration, engagement, change, faster, better, and cheaper. Sounds like a lot! Luckily, you can achieve success in these with just one word…networking, schmoozing, rubbing elbows, connecting, or any word you choose that focuses on building solid, trusting relationships.
In the end, many of us get paid for who we know and who has the information we need, not what you know. There is not enough time in the day to know everything. On the other hand, there is enough time to build and foster relationships that you and your team can utilize to achieve better results.
There is an art and science to all this stuff. Join the conversation with Kupe to discuss ways to help you connect with others. One of the awesome things about this session is you’ll be able to start putting things into practice during the conference!
Kupe is a connector and has a goal in life to meet everyone! As the Founder & Principal of KupeTalks, he possesses over 20 years of helping companies achieve business value. Kupe feels the foundation to his effectiveness over the years begins and ends with improvisation. Kupe is a trained improvisational comedian and uses applied improvisation tools to help everyone be better collaborators, connectors and team players.
Kupe is the co-author of Business Analysis for Dummies and is an industry requested keynote speaker. Being a trained improvisational comedian, Kupe is sure to make you laugh while you’re learning. Kupe is a connector and has a goal in life to meet everyone!

Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A


Speakers
avatar for Kupe Kupersmith

Kupe Kupersmith

Founder, KupeTalks


Tuesday August 8, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Wekiwa 5

2:00pm

Imposter Syndrome: Innovation Killer Among Us? (Part 1) (Audacious Salonniere)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
As an Agile community we talk a lot about innovation and failure. But we don't often allow the space to talk about the head games that keep us from innovating. About those internal dialogues that hold us back from taking the risk which leads to the innovation. How many amazing people are silently berating themselves rather than unleashing their value to the world? It's one thing to encourage people to fail fast and innovate...but what if someone is so constrained, they can't even begin to know how to start failing, much less innovating? How many corporate calls have we all been on, where not a single person will risk the first answer? It's all too common.
In this Audacious Salon session, we will break open the conversation around Imposter Syndrome. Yes, it exists. And it's stealing far too many of our authentic voices. Come and join the dialogue where no one is the expert, but rather we are wrestling through these waters together as an authentic, safe Agile community.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Discover how the Imposter Syndrome is keeping you from living out your authentic voice
  • Experience the safety of authentic individuals struggling with similar things
  • Collaborate with like-minded individuals to create action plans on how to free more voices in our Agile Community
  • Unleash your peers into their bold, brave contributions and innovations



Tuesday August 8, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Suwannee 11&12

2:00pm

Why the tech industry needs all kinds of minds and how to support them. (Sallyann Freudenberg)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
In our work transforming our organisations, sometimes as an industry we appear to have forgotten that teams are still made up of individuals. That we are different to one another. That sometimes we need to work in different ways or different environments to each another.
The diversity that helps create amazing teams and products may ironically be being drummed out of us by our own practices and environments. Inadvertently creating a mono-culture when far from being a weakness, our diversity is our biggest strength. Perhaps we have moved from an “old school culture” (one that focuses too heavily on the written word, on working alone and thinking things through carefully up-front) to a more agile culture (that replaces these with exclusively open-plan spaces, intense collaboration, thinking on one’s feet and lots of audio and visual noise). Neither of these fit everyone all of the time.
In addition, as we work in more cross-functional teams and/or cut across organizational boundaries we will need to find ways to work together whilst still respecting our differences.
This talk is about embracing diversity of thinker and Sal takes a "neurodiversity" approach - that is, a belief that autism and other types of divergence of neurology are normal variations in the human genome rather than "illnesses" which should be "cured". This talk is about making our collaborations more inclusive. About experimenting with how we can create teams, spaces and practices where people can turn up authentically and have their differences not only supported but celebrated.

Learning Outcomes:
  • An appreciation of the prevalence of neurodiversity in the general population and in the tech industry in particular.
  • An understanding the benefits of having a neurodiverse team - what special talents someone neurodiverse might bring.
  • A basic understanding of the superpowers and challenges that come with Autism, ADHD, bipolar disorder and depression.
  • Some ideas for how to modify our agile practices to make them more inclusive to all kinds of minds.
  • Understanding how to make our recruitment process more neurodiversity-friendly so that we don't inadvertently screen out some of the brilliant minds our industry needs.


Speakers
avatar for Sal Freudenberg

Sal Freudenberg

Independent
Sallyann is a neuro-diversity advocate and an Agile Coach, trainer and mentor with 25+ years in the IT industry, 14 of which have been firmly in the Agile and Lean space.She has a PhD in the Psychology of Collaborative Software Development.Along with Katherine Kirk, Sal is co-founder... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
I4

2:00pm

How to go from Zero to Sixty in 19 years - Accelerated learning on the path to Agile (Woody Zuill)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Sometimes stumbling in the right direction pays off. The trick is knowing the right direction. Hint: We can't "know".
During this talk I will share a number of experiences and observations. Hopefully we'll also do a few activities along the way.
This is a next step in a series of talks I've given over the last few years:
First was NoEstimates, which questions the pervasive notion that the only sort of decisions worth making require estimates, and suggests that the reality of software development doesn't support that notion. That is, sometimes there are better questions than "how much do we think this will cost?", "when do we think this be done?", and "should we do project A or project B?".
Next was Continuous Discovery which introduces the idea that the nature of software development is not well served by a "here is what we want, here is how we are going to get it" approach. In it I propose that following a process of discovery better matches the endeavour at hand. Whatever we thought we wanted when we started this "project" changes as we expose reality by actually doing something, and any plan we made before we actually did something is counter to what we now need to do.
In this episode, I'm sharing parts of my own path - the things that seem important to the "Drunkards Walk" that I've been on. To be clear: I'll share my experiences in support of the idea that opening oneself to chance and serendipity might be worthwhile, or at least not completely stupid. Is this a leadership technique? Perhaps. Clearly, the more people stumbling behind you in the same general direction the more it looks like you are a leader. But I'm not suggesting you do the things I did, as you can likely guess, and I'm certain that when we copy the things a successful "leader" has done we are are likely doing the exact opposite from what that leader did.
NOTE: This is a bit related to the ideas in the book "The Drunkard's Walk: How Randomness Rules our Lives" by Leonard Mlodinow, but not very much after all I suppose.

Learning Outcomes:
  • I can't imagine what you might learn, or take away from this presentation
  • I can't presume that anything I have to say or share will be of use to you, but I hope it will be
  • "The value of another’s experience is to give us hope, not to tell us how or whether to proceed" - Peter Block

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Woody Zuill

Woody Zuill

Independent Agile Guide, Independent Agile Guide
I've been a software developer for 36+ years, and I'm an Agile enthusiast. I work as an Independent Agile Guide. I worked with the original "Mob Programming" team at Hunter Industries, and have been instrumental highlighting "No Estimates" concepts. I've enjoy sharing my Agile experiences... Read More →



Tuesday August 8, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
H4

2:00pm

Stalwarts - Linda Rising (Linda Rising)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Do you make New Year's resolutions? How successful are you are keeping them? I'll bet some of you have some techniques that
have worked for you. I invite you to come share them and, for my part, I'll talk about tips from cognitive neuroscience.
We're really good at setting goals. We've been told to dream big, the sky is the limit. We tell others to "go for it." These are mostly American mantras, but now there's research that examines how our brains get in the way of achieving something when all we do is "believe we can do it." Maybe you'll get so excited you'll dust off those New Year's resolutions that you dropped by the wayside in the middle of January.
Linda Rising is an independent consultant who lives near Nashville, Tennessee. Linda has a Ph.D. from Arizona State University in the area of object-based design metrics. Her background includes university teaching as well as work in industry in telecommunications, avionics, and tactical weapons systems. She is an internationally known presenter on topics related to agile development, patterns, retrospectives, the change process, and the connection between the latest neuroscience and software development. Linda is the author of numerous articles and several books. The latest, More Fearless Change, co-authored with Mary Lynn Manns. Her web site is: www.lindarising.org

Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A


Speakers
avatar for Linda Rising

Linda Rising

Queen of Patterns, Linda Rising LLC
Linda Rising is an independent consultant based in Nashville, Tennessee. Linda has a Ph.D. from Arizona State University in the field of object-based design metrics and a background that includes university teaching and industry work in telecommunications, avionics, and tactical weapons... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Wekiwa 5

3:45pm

Imposter Syndrome: Innovation Killer Among Us? (Part 2) (Audacious Salonnaire)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
As an Agile community we talk a lot about innovation and failure. But we don't often allow the space to talk about the head games that keep us from innovating. About those internal dialogues that hold us back from taking the risk which leads to the innovation. How many amazing people are silently berating themselves rather than unleashing their value to the world? It's one thing to encourage people to fail fast and innovate...but what if someone is so constrained, they can't even begin to know how to start failing, much less innovating? How many corporate calls have we all been on, where not a single person will risk the first answer? It's all too common.
In this Audacious Salon session, we will break open the conversation around Imposter Syndrome. Yes, it exists. And it's stealing far too many of our authentic voices. Come and join the dialogue where no one is the expert, but rather we are wrestling through these waters together as an authentic, safe Agile community.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Discover how the Imposter Syndrome is keeping you from living out your authentic voice
  • Experience the safety of authentic individuals struggling with similar things
  • Collaborate with like-minded individuals to create action plans on how to free more voices in our Agile Community
  • Unleash your peers into their bold, brave contributions and innovations



Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Suwannee 11&12

3:45pm

Stalwarts - Alistair Cockburn (Alistair Cockburn)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Although I got famous for my work on Jacobson's use cases and all things agile, this is your chance to raise questions on any topic, at any level. Who knows what my responses will be. Here are some hints for you:
On my mind at the moment are "Guest Leadership" and "pull" cultures.
Guest leadership is when the guests lead. There are 10 times as many guests as hosts, 10 times as many employees as managers. Why are the hosts and managers leading?
What happens if everyone takes leadership moments, temporarily, as the situation calls for.
Pull cultures are those in which people feel drawn to take an action, in distinction to push cultures, in which someone pushes people to take actions. Public corporations are intrinsically push cultures at the top, thanks to the stock market. Creative work thrives in pull cultures, where pressure is less. What are the vocabulary of pull? How can we convert the push from above into space for pull below?
Additionally, I have spent the last five years traveling the globe, so that could be a source of questions.
Ask something, let's see what happens.

Learning Outcomes:
  • *



Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Wekiwa 5
 
Wednesday, August 9
 

10:45am

Agile in Context: The Cynefin Framework, the Three-Circle Model, and the Future of Agile (Daniel Walsh)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
A primary reason for the success of Agile methods, practices, and principles is because they are effective heuristics. But Agile is not a complete set of heuristics for all situations. We need to understand why and where Agile methods and practices work - and where they don’t - in order to adopt, tailor, use, and improve them.
Agile heuristics are especially important and useful for complex environments, where practitioners must work continuously to understand their context, and then respond quickly and flexibly to meet rapidly-changing needs.
The future we envision is one where practitioners understand not only how, but also why Agile methods and practices work across different contexts. Understanding Agile in context increases the chances for successful adoptions and highlight areas where new methods need to be developed or exapted from other disciplines. Treating Agile as a set of heuristics will also reduce recipe-based, dogmatic approaches that are fairly pervasive in the community at large today.
Cynefin is a sensemaking framework that helps people understand their context or situation in order to take appropriate action. The Cynefin framework can be used to select Agile heuristics appropriate for the environment (e.g. use Scrum here, and Kanban there) rather than defaulting to a single, recipe-based approach for all situations.
The Three-Circle Model combines three fundamental perspectives (Business, Usage, and Technology) in a way that permits teams to create balanced products, services, and solutions. The Three-Circle Model is an effective guide to identify and select heuristics, and is especially useful to see where Agile heuristics must be supplemented with other heuristics from other domains.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn what heuristics are and why they work
  • Learn what the Cynefin Framework and the Three-Circle Model are, and how they can be used to identify and select heuristics to complement Agile
  • Know where to find additional information for continued learning

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Walsh

Daniel Walsh

Founder & Principal, FiveWhyz
Dan Walsh is a Founder and Principal of nuCognitive and FiveWhyz.com (a Lean and Agile Coaching Collaborative). He has over a decade of expertise in accelerating product development, driving culture change, and transforming organizations. As a recognized leader in Lean Startup, org... Read More →



Wednesday August 9, 2017 10:45am - 11:15am
Wekiwa 3&4

10:45am

Faster Food and a Better Place to Sleep: Applying Agile Outside Software (Mike Cottmeyer)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Agile methods aren’t just for software anymore. Actually they haven’t been just for software for quite a while now. That said, the types of companies, and the types of industries, that are exploring team-based, collaborative, iterative and incremental approaches to do their work is rather breath-taking. Agile is truly going mainstream. The question at hand is can we apply team-based agile straight out of the box in a non-software context? Can we take our scaled agile approaches and apply them without modification? My experience is that most of the principles and patterns apply, sometimes the practices and frameworks need modification for a particular context.
This talk is going to explore two case studies… one with an international hotel chain going through a major rebranding initiative and another, a well-known fast food restaurant looking to optimize their kitchen production capacity. Two totally different companies, two totally different industries, both trying to use agile to solve their problems. We’ll look at the challenges each faced, what they had in common, and the patterns, tools, and techniques they are using to solve them. We’ll extract some common themes and test them for general applicability to other non-software domains. The talk will close with what might be a new way of applying agile outside of a software context.

Learning Outcomes:
  • What aspects of common agile methodologies work in non-software project domains
  • How to apply mainstream techniques in situationally specific ways
  • What patterns seem to generally work outside of software and how to apply them


Speakers
avatar for Mike Cottmeyer

Mike Cottmeyer

CEO and Founder, LeadingAgile


Wednesday August 9, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
I1

10:45am

What would it take for us to move from 'technical debt' to 'technical health?' (Part 2) (Audacious Salonnaire)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Ward Cunningham introduced the metaphor of technical debt 25 years ago. And yet, 25 years later, many organizations continue to build technical debt more quickly than ever. Why is that? How can we shift the technical conversation to better outcomes for our organizations? And how can we help them see technical health as an enabler for long-term success?
In this session we will explore technical debt and technical health through the lens of real-life stories from participants.
We will start by eliciting technical debt stories from you and other participants. What happened? What impact did technical debt play in the outcomes your organization wanted? Did the notion of technical debt trigger different conversations or actions? What obstacles did you face? How did you overcome them? What challenges remain?
We will then shift the focus to technical health. We will elicit similar stories centred instead on enabling value delivery through technical health. Did the concept of technical health, rather than technical debt, make a difference? In what way? What different outcomes emerged? What insights did you or your organization gain?
We will then dig into systemic forces in our organizations that lead to technical debt. In the stories captured what systemic forces were at play? Was the skill or craftsmanship of the team important? Were there external factors external such as budgeting or hiring policies that had a large impact? How did these factors play out over time? How were you able to dial up the positive factors and deal with the negative ones?
By the end, we plan to have annotated the original stories into a wider view of how technical debt and technical health can impact our organizations. We hope participants will gain deeper insights into how to align technical health with the overall organizational goals to gain more positive outcomes.

Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A



Wednesday August 9, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Suwannee 11&12

10:45am

Design Patterns Thinking and Architecture at Scale (Al Shalloway)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Conway's law suggests that "organizations which design systems ... are constrained to produce designs which are copies of the communication structures of these organizations." The reverse of this is also true - once a design is in place, it will be a drag on attempts to change the communication structures of the organization. The question is how do we break this chicken and egg situation and enable change to designs that already exist. The answer is to think about architecture in a new way – one that can be inspired from the true nature of design patterns.
In the Agile space our architectures are not intended to encompass all possible changes – that would be a gross over-design. Instead, they are intended to evolve and accommodate change as new requirements are discovered. When viewed from the Agile perspective we can see that design patterns and architecture are related in that both are about accommodating change over time.
This talk presents design patterns as a way of thinking about the problems to be solved. Design patterns are intended to enable us to encapsulate variation in a system (be it an algorithm, an object structure, the order of execution, …). In the Agile world, this variation often occurs over time as we learn new information about what we are required to do. This enables us to design code that can evolve. Patterns should be viewed as a thought process that enables emergent design as well as emergent architectures.
The talk concludes with an analysis method that facilitates the discovery of these abstractions. This reveals the full solution – design to accommodate change by discovering and attending to the abstractions in your problem. The thought process of patterns is used to illustrate how this can be done at all levels.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand that patterns are not mere "solutions to recurring problems in a contetxt" but are the basis for a new type of thinking in design
  • Understand the forces in the problem you are trying to solve
  • Reduce the complexity of these forces by making a distinction between the issue and potential implementations
  • Create a simplified model of the issues to be managed in the application – in particular those issues that tend to vary
  • Learn how to identify the concepts in your problem domain and how to create proper abstractions for them
  • Understand that Agile architecture at scale is about managing change, not trying to define a framework that will accommodate it.

Attachments:

Speakers

Wednesday August 9, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
I4

10:45am

Future-Backwards: Lessons Learned from Scaling Agile (Laura Burke, Mary Thorn)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
What if you went back in time and made changes to the way your organization adopted Agile? What were the key events that paved the way for success or failure? In this session, you will hear insights from of people who have scaled Agile around the world while learning the power of running a Future Backwards retrospective (Cynefin).
After the audience is lead through the exercise, the presenters will share their own journey of scaling Agile in a large, distributed organization. By the end of the session, attendees will uncover key turning points from their own experiences and safely share them with the entire group.
We recommend attending with a colleague! However, if you haven’t ever scaled Agile in an organization and are attending to learn, no worries. You can help facilitate others at your table and learn more about their journey, all while gaining experience with a new retrospective technique - one that scales and is great for distributed-team.

Learning Outcomes:
  • * Future Backward retrospective technique
  • * Scaling issues and solutions from the presenters and the attendees
  • * Distributed Agile challenges

Attachments:

Speakers
LB

Laura Burke

ScrumMaster, Ipreo
As a ScrumMaster at Ipreo, I work with mobile development teams spread across two states and three countries. Every team wants their product on a phone or tablet, so I get to partner a lot of teams and R&D leadership to improve our alignment and agility. Past experiences in the... Read More →
avatar for Mary Thorn

Mary Thorn

Agile Practices Lead, Vaco
During her more than 20 years of experience with financial, healthcare, and SaaS-based products, Mary Thorn has held VP, Director, and Manager level positions in various software development organizations.A seasoned Leader and Coach in Agile and Testing Methodologies, Mary has direct... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
F1

10:45am

Product Ownership, Planning & Learning: Growing Product Oriented Teams & Companies (David Hussman)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Early in the agile movement, large technology challenges were often given to alchemist like wizards we called "Architects". They were essential, and sometimes helpful, but also hard to find and sometimes a single point of failure. Experimentation taught many of us the finding a new wizard was not the answer. Instead, the answer was to break down large problems into smaller problems distributed to a collection of builders who collectively and collaboratively took ownership of the system and its architecture.
Today, we have the same opportunity in the product space. Many companies are finding success by what I would like to discuss as "dynamic product discovery". To explore this topic, we can talk about who is needed for product discovery, how often is product discovery helpful, how can we blend product discovery and product delivery into a fluid cadence where product leaders work in one of both tracks, or dynamically float between the two.
Please show up ready to challenge the status quo and explore our new options around product learning, product discovery and the essential need to scale product learning in large systems, especially in IT shops where product and service may be playing second fiddle to customers and interactions.

Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A


Speakers
avatar for David Hussman

David Hussman

Founder, DevJam
David teaches and coaches continuous learning thru product discovery and iterative delivery. 20+ years of coaching product learning into eco-systems of all sizes and shapes around the world has shaped David’s non-dogmatic and pragmatic style. David spends most of his time working... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Wekiwa 5

10:45am

Collaborating uncertainty out of your designs with the new UX Runway (Natalie Warnert)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
As User Experience continues to grow in importance as customers demand ever-more excellence from the products we create, the divide between UX teams and development teams often grows, too. How do we collaborate effectively on new products and features without carrying stories out and over sprint to sprint?
Believe it or not, we need to design more up front - BUT at the program level scale and above - if we want to be able to complete user stories (including UX) in ONE sprint. In this session, Natalie examines where the look-ahead UX Runway (that is, UX tracking ahead one sprint before development on stories) started, where it is now, and where it should pivot in the future. By re-examining Big Design Up Front (BDUF) concepts, mindful user research and customer acquisition costs, balanced with set-based design and advanced design guide tools, a surprising amount of uncertainty can be mitigated before getting to the release and sprint planning stages. This also addresses multi-team swarming on features, which isn’t served well by the one-sprint ahead approach that is currently being utilized.
As the cone of uncertainty narrows and delayed decisions are made collaboratively, designs can come into their own earlier than the sprint before development. This gives teams and programs a better look into what they will be building with less delay, and UX professionals a chance to look at the product or feature cohesively before breaking it into smaller stories and sequencing the delivery plan with far less uncertainty and a greater emphasis on scaling product and customer needs. It’s the next iteration of scaling the UX Runway.

Learning Outcomes:
  • -Balance between big design up front and pre-development designs
  • -Incorporate user research and set-based design at the program level to improve experience and collaborative release planning
  • -Understand what has been tried with agile UX and how to extricate the concepts that work in unique product situations for feature and story level planning and design
  • -Stop seeing development and UX as separate entities that work on separate sprints

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Natalie Warnert

Natalie Warnert

Sr Agile Consultant, Natalie Warnert LLC
Natalie Warnert is the primary founder of the Women in Agile initiative, which enables, empowers, and expands the distribution of new and diverse ideas in the agile and technology communities worldwide. She is a frequent speaker on business and agile topics including product strategy... Read More →



Wednesday August 9, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
F2

11:30am

Building Strong Foundations... Underwriting Fannie Mae’s Agile Transformation. (PHILLIP MANKETO, David McMunn)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Over the course of the last two and one-half years, Fannie Mae has worked aggressively to transform itself from a heavily silo’d and firmly entrenched command and control culture, following a gated workflow, with long release cycles, to an Agile organization. Today, Fannie Mae is a more dynamic value oriented organization that is responsive to stakeholders, focused on achieving greater efficiency by enabling fast-feedback loops, as well as using empirical data to optimize mature and persistent agile values and practices.
Within the larger context of the transformation to enterprise agility, this Experience Report will focus on the case for change, Fannie Mae’s journey and the corresponding challenges, benefits and key learnings realized. Our conclusion, while it is important to build bridges with business stakeholders, mature agile teams, leverage automation and embrace the values and principles of the agile manifesto… a successful and longstanding transformation is dependent upon the unrelenting focus on changing the ecosystem supporting the organization’s change at the outset.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • - An agile transformation at the team level optimizes locally and is fragile
  • - An agile transformation at the program level optimizes locally and is also fragile
  • - Rather, the momentum supporting an agile transformation comes from the ecosystem supporting the organization and should be leadership’s focus for change at the outset… focus to late on changing the ecosystem and the transformation will collapse.
  • - Leadership and Management are pivotal change agents required at the outset to change traditional ways of thinking, embedded legacy culture as well as organizational challenges to sustainable transformation.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Phillip Manketo

Phillip Manketo

Senior Agile Consultant, ELIASSEN GROUP
Senior Agile Delivery Leader, Coach and Trainer with long-standing expertise facilitating enterprise transformation for commercial enterprises and federal entities.



Wednesday August 9, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Wekiwa 1&2

2:00pm

Agile Software Development without Software (Doug Rose)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Over fifteen years ago the Agile Manifesto was created for the express purpose of developing better software. Yet better software is not the underlying reason that organizations hired all those agile teams. The software was the "means" and greater organizational value was the "ends." Now many of these same organizations are looking to capitalize on a new resource. They’re collecting petabytes of structured, semi-structured and unstructured data. Exploiting this digital raw material has many of the same challenges as software development. That’s why many well-formed data science teams struggle with some of these same questions:
  • Are we creating something valuable?
  • Can we closely coordinate with our customer?
  • How can we quickly pivot to take advantage of unexpected outcomes?
Many long established agile team practices could also apply to newer data science teams. These teams require a lightweight empirical framework to help deliver products of pure discovery. The core difference is the iterative product. Instead of minimum viable software, these teams will deliver frequent valuable insights.
This talk will show how to apply a lightweight agile framework to data science teams. These teams can use modified version of common agile practices such as user stories, cross-functional teams and frequent iterative delivery.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Connect data science challenges and software development challenges
  • See how to apply the agile mindset to data science teams
  • Introduce new data science team agile practices
  • Discuss a proposed Data Science Lifecycle (DSLC)

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Doug Rose

Doug Rose

Head Doug, Doug Enterprises, LLC
Doug Rose specializes in organizational coaching, training and change management. He’s worked over twenty years transforming organizations with technology and training. He’s helped several large companies optimize their business processes and improve productivity and delivery... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Wekiwa 3&4

2:00pm

Hire Great People for Agile Teams using Interview Games (Jason Tice)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Are you interested in learning how to identify strong candidates for agile teams faster? Join us for a “fun” workshop on interview games that emulate desired agile team behaviors and collaboration within an interview setting. Participants will experience a series of simple games designed for use during interviews that:
  • Assess and discuss relevant skills for agile team roles
  • Evaluate communication skills and the ability to respond to change
  • Engage in collaborative problem solving working as a team
  • Share and receive feedback from others
Interview games allow interviewers and candidates to simulate work scenarios and then debrief on the activities that transpire. Rather than discussing prior achievements on a candidate’s resume, interview games enable a discussion of the shared experience created by the game which provides better data to assess candidate fit. In practice, interview games provide a more engaging and respectful way to assess a candidate’s ability to identify improvement opportunities and to emphasize with others.
During this highly interactive session, participants will work in small groups and conduct mock interviews to experience the sequence of interview games and gain hands-on experience in how to facilitate and debrief the games presented.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will learn the background behind the development of interview games – what problems about traditional interviews do interview games address.
  • Participants will experience how to facilitate and debrief a series of interview games that support role-specific skills assessment, ability to work in a collaborative creative setting, ability to share feedback, ability to identify and communicate improvement opportunities, and ability to empathize with others.
  • Participants will gain best practices and lessons learned from the adoption of interview games within multiple organizations.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jason Tice

Jason Tice

Vice President, Asyncrhony
Jason Tice has over 15 years of experience using collaborative activities and games to help organizations, their teams and their customers achieve clarity and alignment to enable high performance. More recently, Jason has led efforts to adapt collaboration frameworks familiar to agile... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
F2

2:00pm

What is Agile's role in social political movements? (Part 1) (Audacious Salonnaire)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Agile coaches are on the front lines of helping teams and organizations deliver value and with respecting people as one of the foundational tenets. As Agilists we understand that when people come to work they are bringing all the wonderfulness and challenges that make them up. Noticing the growing division in American society how does an Agilist help their teams/organizations focus on delivering value. Going beyond who is right and who is wrong in the national discourse, this session will ask participants to be vocal about their beliefs and have them out in the open. The session will explore "What does it mean for Agliists to talk about race, class, and gender?"

Learning Outcomes:
  • Gain fluency and awareness when looking at the social/political forces that affect your team/organization. Start to develop a toolset you can use to help address issues of race, class, and gender when seeing those dynamics in your teams/organization.



Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Suwannee 11&12

2:00pm

Psychology of Coaching: Understanding Science of Change (Pavel Dabrytski)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
In October 2016 I received a call, "Hey dude, I don’t know nothing about Agile, but I need to become an Agile coach a-s-a-p – my company just got a new contract." I laughed for a second, explained that it takes a bit longer than a week to learn to coach, and wished him luck. I also knew that, shortly, he would be walking into his customer's office in this new role.
Agile Coach is the new black! But how can you, a good coach, stand out from the crowd of less competent peers? Let me offer you this workshop to explore the science of coaching and the ways in which it works. We start with concepts of neuroplasticity and the brain processes of creating new neuron pathways. Then we move to motivation and learn which type is the best. Finally, we finish with the discussion on brain activation states which we practice in a few short exercises. By understanding the new field of coaching psychology, you will become a better practitioner.
I am an affiliate member of the Institute of Coaching at McLean Hospital, the Harvard Medical School affiliate. I studied coaching psychology at Harvard Extension School.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand that neuroplasticity is the reason why people take long to learn new behaviors
  • Learn that the autonomous motivation is the most persistent type of motivation and that an Agile coach must strive for it
  • Learn about seven activation steps and the ways to stimulate brain’s creativity
  • Practice multiple reflection techniques during a coaching conversation
  • Learn practical behaviors: open monitoring (sensing), asking the right questions, providing rich reflections, engaging in relational flow, and being comfortable with generative moments

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Pavel Dabryski

Pavel Dabryski

Founder, Think Agile



Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
H4

2:00pm

From DevOps to DevSecOps - Application security for a Lean/Agile/DevOps environment (Larry Maccherone)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
The bad guys don't break in through the highly secure bank vault door; they attack the crumbly bricks and mortar of the vault walls. The same is true for application security. The vast majority of incidents don't target security features like encryption, authentication, and authorization... the bank vault door. Rather, they target vulnerabilities in the "boring", non-security parts of the code... the crumbly bricks and mortar of the vault walls.
The security function is still largely throw-it-over-the-wall at many organizations, but things are changing. There is growing awareness that you cannot prevent the vast majority of incidents with a bolt-on approach to security. You have to produce applications that are free of such vulnerabilities as they are being developed. In other words, you have to BUILD SECURITY IN.
Just like DevOps is a cultural transformation, to BUILD SECURITY IN we need a mindset shift and cultural change. We need DevSecOps.
This talk starts by introducing a DevSecOps manifesto and then a process model for achieving a "BUILD SECURITY IN" DevSecOps culture. The framework is designed to sit on top of any SDLC but it is particularly suited to Lean/Agile environments and even more so to a DevOps environment or in conjunction with an ongoing DevOps transformation.

Learning Outcomes:
  • The values identified in a DevSecOps manifesto
  • The key disciplines of security practice most relevant to development teams
  • A maturity scale for these disciplines that you can leverage to incrementally up your application security game
  • The key measures that will provide feedback for a data-driven and gamification approach to cultural change
  • Common objections from large organization inertia/ossification and how to overcome them
  • How to BUILD SECURITY IN rather than bolt it on

Attachments:

Speakers

Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
I3

2:00pm

Stop Using Waterfall Goals: How OKR can help you focus on Value instead of features (Felipe Castro)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Even though companies are using Agile for delivering software, when it comes to goal setting the waterfall mindset is still the norm. Most organizations use an annual, top-down process to create a set of static goals that is in direct conflict with Agile.
Waterfall goals permeate Agile, turning teams into "feature factories" with no focus on business results. Instead of points and velocity, teams should be measuring actual value. Rather than following a fixed roadmap with long feedback cycles, they should quickly validate hypotheses.
The alternative is OKR (Objectives and Key Results), the Agile goal setting framework adopted by Google and others. But as with any other tool, OKR can be misused - tracking activities instead of results.
This talk will show how OKR can take Agile to the next level, creating autonomous teams driven by value and not by the opinions of the stakeholders. I will also share a model to help companies make the transition from "working software" to "valuable software."

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding that goal setting is still mostly a waterfall process.
  • The need to evolve Agile to focus on value instead of features.
  • How to create OKRs.
  • Using OKR to complement Agile and Lean.
  • A model to transition from delivering "working software" to "valuable software."

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Felipe Castro

Felipe Castro

Founder, OKR Coach, Lean Performance
Felipe Castro helps companies leverage OKR (Objectives and Key Results) to transform how they use goals by abandoning the waterfall, command&control mindset and embracing an agile approach for goal setting. He is a global thought leader in combining OKRs with Agile and Lean to... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
H3

2:00pm

Agile Leadership Strategies: Winning the War on Complexity (Derek W. Wade)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
The modern organization is at war with complexity. The code for a typical webpage is the size of a typical video game from the 1990s. "Standards are great, there's so many to choose from." Projects have multiple stakeholders and ever-changing, conflicting Priority One features. Despite gains from Agile methods, the multi-person development arena is typified by volatility, uncertainty, ambiguity, and complexity — what the U.S. military calls "the fog of war."
Derek W. Wade’s background in Cognitive Science has shown him that humans have innate skills at managing this complexity. But too often, he sees leaders waste precious human capital because they don’t understand how these skills work. Over the last 6 years, Derek has explored Team Science — which evolved from studying aviation, clinical, and military teams — for practical insights into how people work best together. If you want to help your teams cut through the “fog” and have fun doing it, Derek will use mini-games and stories to introduce you to these insights and how to apply them. Leave armed with knowledge of mental models, cognitive load, situational awareness, and boundary objects so your teams can use complexity to their advantage, solve the right problems, support each other, and finally use those whiteboards, stickies, and online tools properly.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will be better prepared to lead teams in emergent, complex domains (such as software development) by learning:
  • 1. Our ability to solve problems depends on our ability to internally model the world around us;
  • 2. Cognitive limits of this ability, and examples of work practices which respect (and ignore) those limits;
  • 3. Refactoring team communication: multi-person use of models vs. mere transmission of information;
  • 4. Leadership stances which foster effective mental models at the multi-person, multi-team level;
  • 5. Explicitly managing meta-information about the organization/team. Product goals, objectives, and tasks are only half of the work in knowledge-work.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Derek W. Wade

Derek W. Wade

President, Kumido Adaptive Strategies
Derek W. Wade is the founder of Kumido Adaptive Strategies, an organizational performance consultancy specializing in cognitive/learning science. His human-centered approach has improved hundreds of collaborative efforts across a broad range of industries from healthcare to finance... Read More →



Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
H2

2:00pm

Asking over Telling: Using humble enquiry to build trust and do great work (Ellen Grove, Bruce Scharlau)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
More asking, less telling. As an agile leader, adopt the approach of humble enquiry to build relationships, increase trust and collaboration, and deal with the challenges of organizational transformations.
"Humble enquiry is the fine art of drawing someone out, of asking questions to which you do not already know the answer, of building a relationship based on curiosity and interest in the other person." - Edgar H. Schein
Working in an agile way asks us to rethink how we relate to each other as we tackle complex problems and challenge the traditional structures of our organizations. Humble enquiry - the art of asking instead of telling - is a critical skill for agilists who seek to improve collaboration and address difficult problems head on. Inspired by Edgar H. Schein's book 'Humble Enquiry, this workshop will teach you the fundamentals of how to do more asking and less telling. Through mini-lectures and interactive exercises, we'll discuss the different types of questioning, consider the forces around and within us that inhibit our ability to ask instead of tell, and examine how this powerful technique can improve collaboration within agile teams as well as help to address some of the challenges of agile transformations.

Learning Outcomes:
  • • Improve your leadership skills by learning the basics of humble enquiry
  • • Recognize the constraints (cultural and psychological) that make it difficult to ask instead of tell
  • • Activities that you can use yourself and with their teams/organizations to practice this skill.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ellen Grove

Ellen Grove

business agility coach, Agile Partnership
Ellen Grove is an Agile coach and trainer who helps teams to do better work by coaching them to cocreate the circumstances in which they can work productively and effectively. Her Agile coaching practice is founded in over 18 years’ experience leading software testing, development... Read More →
avatar for Bruce Scharlau

Bruce Scharlau

Senior Lecturer, University of Aberdeen
I'm looking for opportunities for students to collaborate on live client projects as interns. I'm always seeking to engineer collisions between real world & computing students at Uni. of Aberdeen with lean, agile & service design because experience+theory trumps theory


Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Wekiwa 7&8

2:00pm

Stalwarts - Lisa Crispin (Lisa Crispin)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Many teams transitioning to agile struggle with testing activities, and deliver products that fail to delight their customers. Testers are often lost in agile transitions, left to fend for themselves on new cross-functional teams without training or support. Programmers may get training in development practices such as TDD, but not in the many types of testing for which the whole team should be responsible.
Please join Lisa to explore the whole-team approach to building in quality, and how testers and teams can build quality into their product and deliver the features and quality attributes valued by customers and stakeholders. Be ready to share your stories of how you and your teams learned ways to improve testing and quality.
Lisa Crispin is the co-author, with Janet Gregory, of More Agile Testing: Learning Journeys for the Whole Team (2014), Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams (2009), the LiveLessons Agile Testing Essentials video course, and “The Whole Team Approach to Agile Testing” 3-day training course. She co-authored Extreme Testing (2002) with Tip House. She is a contributor to Experiences of Test Automation by Dorothy Graham and Mark Fewster (Addison-Wesley, 2011), Beautiful Testing (O’Reilly, 2009) and other books. Lisa was voted by her peers as the Most Influential Agile Testing Professional Person at Agile Testing Days in 2012. She enjoys helping people find ways to build more quality into their software products, as well as hands-on testing. Please visit www.lisacrispin.com and www.agiletester.ca for more.

Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A


Speakers
avatar for Lisa Crispin

Lisa Crispin

Testing Advocate at mabl (USA)
Lisa Crispin is the co-author, with Janet Gregory, of More Agile Testing: Learning Journeys for the Whole Team (2014), Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams (2009), the LiveLessons “Agile Testing Essentials” video course, and “Agile Testing for the Whole... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Wekiwa 5

3:45pm

No Complaints...Upside Only: Good News about the Agile Movement from Agile Veterans (Audacious Salonnaire, Audacious Salonnaire)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Been in the Agile Community since before it was called Agile and tired of newcomers labeling whatever they already do as Agile? Tired of people saying "Agile doesn't work" when they won't even do what you suggest? Think Agile is getting watered down?
We don't want to hear about it!
We want to hear some success stories. What progress have we made? What are we proud of? What new ideas have we found? What are we experimenting with? What are we thinking about trying?
There will be no complaints allowed in this session. No downers or in-fighting. No brand competition. So that we can create what we truly want, we will focus on exactly that -- what we want. We'll look at our progress so far and bright future ahead.

Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A



Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Suwannee 11&12

3:45pm

Disciplined Agile Master Class: Agile for the Enterprise (Scott Ambler, Mark Lines)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Teams within your organization have been experimenting with agile techniques such as Scrum, continuous integration (CI), and agile testing and have shown promising results. But people within your organization still have significant reservations about this new development strategy. How does modeling and documentation fit it? How do you ensure your organization’s long-term goals are still being addressed? How does this approach scale to large teams, to distributed teams, or to regulatory environments? How do you govern these agile teams effectively?
Agile transformation is hard because cultural change is hard. It’s not one problem that needs to be solved, but a series of hundreds decisions affecting lots of people over a long period of time that affects relationships, processes, and most importantly the mindset of those working within the change. Disciplined Agile (DA) is unlike any other framework, because it’s based on empiricism, industry data and industry adoption of modern agile practices. The result is a huge wealth of structured information that allows you to map your challenges into a decision structure of proven strategies that other enterprises have found to work in practice. In effect you can apply the DA framework to identify process improvements that reflect the actual situations faced by your teams.
In this workshop you learn how to go beyond Scrum and Kanban to take a disciplined, modern agile approach to solution delivery that provides a foundation from which to scale. To help cut through some of the agile rhetoric, industry statistics will be shared throughout this workshop. This is a collaborative workshop were participants will work in small teams to describe how they would address common scenarios faced by agile teams in modern organizations.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Discover how organizations around the world are implementing agile in enterprise settings
  • Discover how agile solution delivery works from beginning to end
  • Learn about the choices you have available to you so that you can adopt a strategy that works for you
  • Gain first-hand knowledge about the DA process decision framework and its application from its co-creators

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Scott Ambler

Scott Ambler

Senior Consulting Partner, Disciplined Agile, Inc.
Scott is a Senior Consulting Partner of Scott Ambler + Associates, working with organizations around the world to help them to improve their software processes. He provides training, coaching, and mentoring in disciplined agile and lean strategies at both the project and organizational... Read More →
avatar for Mark Lines

Mark Lines

Managing Partner & Agile Coach, Scott Ambler + Associates
Mark is an Enterprise Agile Coach, change agent, and co-creator of the Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD) framework. With Scott Ambler, he is co-author of Disciplined Agile Delivery: A Practitioner's Guide to Agile Software Delivery in the Enterprise. He helps organizations all over... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
I3

3:45pm

Agile Product Thinking: Stalwarts talk with Jeff Patton (Jeff Patton)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
This session is about product thinking, product ownership, and how to give customers and users what they need and not just what they ask for.
There’s always too much to build. Always. And, most of what we build doesn’t succeed. At least not to the level we’d hoped. Agile development alone doesn’t solve this biggest challenge with software development, and all product development for that matter. But, contemporary product thinking does bring us some practices that do help.
Come chat with Jeff and discuss the essentials of product thinking and how we use product discovery approaches to articulate and test solution ideas quickly and cost effectively before fully investing in production software. Feel free to ask questions about how stories and story maps can help, and any other product development questions that might come to mind.

Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A


Speakers
avatar for Jeff Patton

Jeff Patton

Chief Troublemaker, Jeff Patton & Associates
Jeff makes use of over 20 years of product design and development experience to help companies create great products.Jeff started in software development in the early 90s as a project leader and senior developer for a small software product company. There he learned that well written... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Wekiwa 5
 
Thursday, August 10
 

9:00am

Ethics and Innovation in Software Development: Hope in the Agile Movement? (Part 1) (Audacious Salonniere)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
The tension between creating a new technology and it's potential use or misuse is an age old story. In the myth of Prometheus, the gift of fire to humans results in eternal punishment. Our ability to create innovative technology often outpaces our understanding of its implications.
In a little under two centuries computers have moved from the laboratory to ubiquity with the effect that what we create now has serious consequences for the lives of our fellow human beings.
Do the values of the agile movement provide some inspiration in considering the welfare of others beyond team mates or users of our software? What are our individual responsibilities in what we create? What would it look like if ethical considerations were part of our decision making? What would it be like if we considered not only ‘can’ we build it, but ‘should’ we? Can we imagine a better future, and if so how might we begin that journey?

Learning Outcomes:
  • Group discussion and workshop



Thursday August 10, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
Suwannee 11&12

9:00am

Coaching where you live: An internal coach’s perspective on how to thrive (Jennifer Honermann)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Are you struggling to tell the story of why your organization needs internal coaches? Are you an internal coach and perceive the value you provide is not understood? Struggling to build influence with leaders in your organization? Are you wondering how to navigate through being a servant leader in an organization that measures your success by the results that you deliver? Are you interested in connecting and learning from others that share the same challenge and passion? 
If so, this session is for you! I will share my own personal experience at Capital One in creating the support and space for internal coaches as well as my toughest lessons learned. This session will include not only my biggest lessons learned, but also create the space for you to refine your personal elevator pitch, and give you an opportunity to connect with and learn from other internal coaches. 
You will walk out of this session with:
1) Your own elevator pitch on why what you do makes a difference.
2) Techniques to bring back and try within your organization.
3) A bigger network of other internal coaches.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Tips and techniques to apply within your own organization to help root your internal coaching practice.
  • Tips, techniques, and resources to stay fresh, current, and relevant as a coach in an organization that you permanently live in.
  • A greater network of internal coaches to collaborate with in the future.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Honermann

Jennifer Honermann

Director, Agile Delivery and Coaching, Capital One
I guide the internal agile practice and coaches in my division at Capital One. I love the potential of what we are trying to accomplish and the freedom to test and learn. That said, it's not been easy. I would like to connect with internal coaches to share lessons learned! We... Read More →



Thursday August 10, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
Wekiwa 7&8

9:00am

The pursuit of DevOps: 3 unique Microsoft journeys leading to a customer-focused path (Martina Hiemstra)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Many ask how do Agile and DevOps fit together? Even more importantly, how do you get there? Three of Microsoft's largest divisions started with radically different approaches and have had very unique journeys. Ironically, they have come to very similar live-site, customer-based and Agile places. One of the Product Groups releases daily thanks to 36,000+ automated test cases. Another flights on demand daily and continues to see increases in quality and customer satisfaction. Microsoft IT is the newest on this journey and has succeeded in key service offering areas to attain early DevOps results.
This session will candidly share the unique approaches, challenges and learnings along the way for these massive organizations spanning 15,000+ employees. It will provide the opportunity to understand the key investments and changes these organizations had to make to help Microsoft accelerate its digital transformation. You will have the opportunity to ask questions on how this can be applied to your organizations. This interactive talk will be especially applicable to those change agents seeking to influence enterprise level transformation. This session will include real-time surveys with participants to spot check whether attendees are actively trying similar tactics and if they are working for them too.
Key learning goals for this session are to share the different strategies to get to DevOps at scale, their pros and cons from real world journeys. This presentation embraces the principle of Kaizen and the benefit of learning from others.

Learning Outcomes:
  • To learn from 3 different enterprise strategies to attain DevOps at scale including their pros and cons from real world journeys.
  • Key themes that will be emphasized as recommended practices are automate everything, accountability matters, scale requires support (i.e. Coaching) to scale with it, leadership support needs increase as you grow, Lean-Agile is a winning transformation combination, focus on leaning out the pipeline of activities, and engage your customers on multiple levels.
  • Specifics for tools and practices in each of the themes will be shared (i.e. proven testing techniques and tools to help with automation).

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Martina Hiemstra

Martina Hiemstra

Principal Group Manager, Microsoft Corporation
I've been an Agile practitioner for over 10 years and love to deliver value that delights customers! I love the outdoors, playing music and growing organic vegetables...



Thursday August 10, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
F1

9:00am

Stalwarts - Lyssa Adkins (Lyssa Adkins)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Lyssa Adkins is a passionate player in the Agile Coaching profession. She develops Agile Coaches to be the skilled and visionary change leaders that their organizations need, and that Agile calls for. In 2010, she co-founded the Agile Coaching Institute to answer that call. Since then, ACI has up-leveled the skills of close to 6,000 Agile Coaches and strategized with their organizations to develop Agile Coaching as a core capability for Agile transformation. She is the author of Coaching Agile Teams, which is still a top-10 Agile book seven years after publication. When you meet, she is likely to truly listen to you.
Lyssa likes to explore agile coaching, agile transformation, adult human development, human systems dynamics, societal change, organizational change, the benefits and costs of being human in the workplace, facilitating intense conflict, the role of nature, and books of all sorts. She tends toward a balance of the provocative and the practical, and likes to make sure she really understands someone's question before answering.

Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A


Speakers
avatar for Lyssa Adkins

Lyssa Adkins

Agile Coach & Consultant, LyssaAdkins.com
I came to Agile as a project leader with over 15 years project management expertise. Even with all that experience, nothing prepared me for the power and simplicity of Agile done well.My Agile experience, along with my professional coaching and training abilities, gives me the perspective... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
H4

10:45am

Ethics and Innovation in Software Development: Hope in the Agile Movement? (Part 2) (Audacious Salonnaire, Audacious Salonnaire)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
The tension between creating a new technology and it's potential use or misuse is an age old story. In the myth of Prometheus, the gift of fire to humans results in eternal punishment. Our ability to create innovative technology often outpaces our understanding of its implications.
In a little under two centuries computers have moved from the laboratory to ubiquity with the effect that what we create now has serious consequences for the lives of our fellow human beings.
Do the values of the agile movement provide some inspiration in considering the welfare of others beyond team mates or users of our software? What are our individual responsibilities in what we create? What would it look like if ethical considerations were part of our decision making? What would it be like if we considered not only ‘can’ we build it, but ‘should’ we? Can we imagine a better future, and if so how might we begin that journey?

Learning Outcomes:
  • Group discussion and workshop



Thursday August 10, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Suwannee 11&12

10:45am

Designing your Transformation Roadmap (Skip Angel)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
What is the best way to approach an agile transformation? How can you ensure the transformation delivers the business outcomes you are seeking? How should you measure your progress along the way?
As you begin on what is potentially a multi-year journey it is important to be able to answer these questions in order to align the organization and guide investment, and yet, big up front plans will restrict your ability to learn and adapt. What is needed is a different approach, one that leverages agile and lean techniques.
In this interactive workshop, leaders and change agents will get to experience tried and tested techniques for creating a transformational roadmap aligned to goals and measurable outcomes. They will learn practical methods for defining and prioritizing the steps on that journey and discover the importance of identifying and celebrating successes along the way.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the importance of creating a roadmap to guide your transformational journey.
  • Learn techniques to develop a transformation roadmap using a supplied set of transformation planning cards (participants will get to take a set of cards with them).
  • Determine and prioritize the activities needed to align and deliver against measurable business outcomes.
  • Discover how to break the roadmap down into manageable releases, helping to realize improvements early and often.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Skip Angel

Skip Angel

Transformation Consultant and Mentor, CA Technologies


Thursday August 10, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
I4

10:45am

HR Performance Management ~ How do we Solve Enterprise Agile's Biggest Impediment Yet? (Dan Sloan)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Individual goals. Annual reviews. Ratings. Bell curves. Ugh.
Are these rituals considered an impediment in your Enterprise Agile journey? If so, then the time has come to revolutionize your organization's Human Resources (HR) performance management system.
In this presentation, we will examine the philosophy behind traditional HR performance management and the negative impact it is having in Agile organizations. To address this complex challenge, we will explore the emergent field of Agile performance management and share practical, real-world experiences that can be used to champion this change in partnership with your HR organization.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Obtain basic understanding of why performance management systems exist
  • Absorb historical context behind the management of "performance" vs. "growth"
  • Increase ability to recognize the unintended consequences of an Agile-incompatible performance management approach
  • Acquire tools and evidence for advancing an Enterprise Agile journey stalled by performance management

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Dan Sloan

Dan Sloan

Enterprise Agility Coach, Cox Automotive
I am a member of the Enterprise Agility coaching team at Cox Automotive, a 34,000-person global enterprise focused on "Transforming the way the world buys, sells and owns cars". Prior to joining Cox Automotive, I was the co-founder and practice lead for an organizational transformation... Read More →



Thursday August 10, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
F3

10:45am

Prioritization – 10 different techniques for optimizing what to start next (Troy Magennis)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
When we choose to do one piece of work, we most often defer something else. What is the impact of that deferred work? Is it costlier than finding the funding for both? The goal of prioritization and ordering is to maximize the return on people, time and cash at hand. This session looks at ten different techniques and discussed how, why and when to use which method.
Depending on circumstances, even the crudest ordering method may be the right one (“my opinion”). For other circumstances, rigorous understanding of the impact of work order on product lifetime profits might be needed. We will discuss how to decide.
Some question answered are –
  • How good is just randomly picking?
  • What if we just focus on a value estimate alone?
  • How does duration and effort change the optimal order?
  • How optimal is the SAFe ordering technique and where it might mislead?
  • If we wanted to be “certain” what is involved?
  • How do dependencies impact our ordering choices?
This session stresses there is no one optimal technique. There are a variety of techniques that balance the effort required for analysis versus the chance of not finding the absolute optimal result. By attending this session, you will have a better idea of how to choose.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Ten different techniques for work order prioritization
  • Pros and cons of the different techniques
  • How to quantify the likelihood and impact of a poor ordering decision
  • How to know what method is the right balance of effort and optimization
  • How to account for backlog dependencies

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Troy Magennis

Troy Magennis

Focused Objective LLC
Troy is an experienced IT executive who has been involved in many leading software organizations over 20 years. Most recently, Troy founded Focused Objective to build and promote risk management tools that simulate and forecast software development projects and portfolios. Technology... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
I1

2:00pm

What is Agile's role in social political movements? (Part 2) (Audacious Salonnaire)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Agile coaches are on the front lines of helping teams and organizations deliver value and with respecting people as one of the foundational tenets. As Agilists we understand that when people come to work they are bringing all the wonderfulness and challenges that make them up. Noticing the growing division in American society how does an Agilist help their teams/organizations focus on delivering value. Going beyond who is right and who is wrong in the national discourse, this session will ask participants to be vocal about their beliefs and have them out in the open. The session will explore "What does it mean for Agliists to talk about race, class, and gender?"

Learning Outcomes:
  • Gain fluency and awareness when looking at the social/political forces that affect your team/organization. Start to develop a toolset you can use to help address issues of race, class, and gender when seeing those dynamics in your teams/organization.



Thursday August 10, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Suwannee 11&12

2:00pm

The 3 hour Tour: Designing Workshops That Avoid a Stay on Gilligan’s Island (Billie Schuttpelz, Melody Yale)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
What do you do when your customer says "The other Agile workshops we've had were like the Gilligan's Island, all of them ended in a shipwreck of no value." Would you like instead, to hear your customer say "You're the real deal, can you please facilitate 3 more workshops"? This facilitation design workshop will show you how to streamline your content and use a repeatable method that intensifies the value so much that they will keep asking for more coaching from you.
In this session, you will learn a facilitation design method to:
• Create a visual radiator as your facilitation guide
• Visualize your end to end value for the whole workshop (no matter how many hours long)
• Build-in audience engagement
• Adapt and responds to change by easily moving topics and exercises around in the flow
• Plug and play content, exercises and facilitation techniques from any method
In this session you will hear about the proven approach from facilitators who have had increased coaching callbacks due to using this method. In addition, you get to see how others have designed the same workshop in different ways. The materials used in this workshop will be available for your future use. With this method you will have no reason to fear the infamous 3-hour tour.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Accelerate workshop design skills
  • Demonstrate the techniques through an interactive workshop exercise
  • Understand how to mix and match content and activities to increase value to the customer

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Billie Schuttpelz

Billie Schuttpelz

Business Agility Enablement Manager, SolutionsIQ/Accenture
Billie Schuttpelz is known for shortening feedback loops across silos and redesigning large, complex product eco-systems. Her Lean-Agile perspective gained over a 20 year career, including engagements in 5 countries, has enabled Fortune 10 enterprises to deliver to market faster... Read More →
avatar for Melody Yale

Melody Yale

Agile Coach and Trainer
Melody is an Agile Coach and Trainer with experience facilitating since 2005. She has conducted training for companies ranging from start-ups to Fortune 500 companies. Melody's background in product management for global software companies has given her the opportunity to speak at... Read More →



Thursday August 10, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
I1

2:00pm

How Software Craftsmanship Facilitates Disruptive Innovation (Rob Myers)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Leaders of development teams want to be able to adapt their existing product to innovative ideas and shifting market conditions. This is often the reason organizations "go Agile," yet this flexible ability to deliver rich business value is often frustratingly out of reach.
Agile teams and their management are also familiar with the value of individual development practices. For example, Test-Driven Development's ability to catch defects early, and to provide the team with the ability to confidently extend the product. What Rob has found by working with a number of teams, each for six months or more, is another much greater--and more rare--source of business value resulting from diligent attention to software craftsmanship and the resulting two-way trust that forms between Development and Product.
You will hear a handful of surprising (but real) first-person tales, each detailing a time when changing market forces, dramatic pivots, disruptive technological changes, or insightful requests were managed by the delivery team within a single two-week sprint. Each of these "Black Swan User Stories" (Rob's term for powerful, risky, and unforeseen user-stories) resulted in multiplying user productivity, opening whole new markets, or delighting and retaining critical customers.
What we found in each case was that rapid completion of our Black Swan User Stories was the result of diligent, disciplined application of a few software craftsmanship practices; and that this resulted in the concrete realization of organizations' long-held expectations for Agile software development.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Hear real examples of how maintainable, high quality code is critical to the rapid completion of innovative user stories.
  • Explore the surprisingly direct path between software craftsmanship and business value.
  • Learn why leadership would want to encourage, support, and defend a team's dedication to software craftsmanship and the use of Agile engineering practices such as Test-Driven Development.
  • Learn why an early commitment to software craftsmanship practices is crucial to product longevity and innovation.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Rob Myers

Rob Myers

Principal Agile Instructor & Coach, Agile for All
Rob Myers has over 30 years of professional experience in software development, and has been coaching teams on TDD, Scrum, Lean, Agile, and XP practices since 1998. He has been delivering Agile-related talks and courses since 2002. His courses are always a blend of fun and practical... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
H3

3:45pm

How Agile can Data-Focused Teams Really Be? Should we just give up? (Audacious Salonniere)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Agile for data-focused teams is gaining momentum. Data industry thought leaders offer prescriptive practices such as specific data-management tools or evolutionary data modeling techniques, and others don’t believe these things are as important as simple Agile principles and practices. Some data teams successfully apply pure Scrum, Kanban or XP; others find combinations of or adaptations to these frameworks work better for them. Some create brand new “Agile” methodologies, while others simply give up and go back to their traditional methods.
Given the wide variations we face in work that can be simple, chaotic, complex and/or complicated, it’s no wonder we struggle to adapt to agile principles and practices while keeping the wheels on our bus (pun intended).
Some of the questions we will consider in this session include, but are not limited to:
• What problems are we trying to solve by becoming more Agile in data-focused work? What problems get created in the process?
• Is Agile really applicable to data work, or is it not worth the effort in the end? Is it better to do things the way we’ve always done them, and get the same results we’ve always achieved? Is predicable underperformance better than unpredictable success?
• What’s really different when we are working with data instead of mobile, workflow, and web technologies? Does Agile work the same way with data-focused efforts, or are there important differences?
• Is team culture more important than technical practices, or are certain technical practices baseline enablers for agility?
• Where can the data world contribute to thought leadership for Agile endeavors?
Bring your own experience and ideas on increasing agility in data-based products; what has worked well and what hasn’t. What you think might work well for a data-focused team to become more Agile, and what you know won’t. Engage with others who care about the future of data work as we learn together. Many of us will continue to explore these ideas beyond this session and after this conference!

Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A



Thursday August 10, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Suwannee 11&12

3:45pm

AMA: Gender and Sexuality (Bonnie Aumann)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
*AMA means Ask Me Anything.*
 
The topic of diversity has exploded in the tech industry, but it's left many questions in its wake. There are new acronyms to learn - what do the A's mean again in LGBTQAA+? People you've known for years are asking you to use the pronoun They: has their gender identity changed or are they being political? Some women are just realizing that they've been affected by systemic bias, while others have suffered from harassment and assault at conferences.
I'll tell you my story. My 13-year career in tech has, through some unknown grace, been spent vocally out of the closet. I've worked on three continents, in start ups and Fortune 100 companies alike, and without fail, a colleague (or boss!) has shyly approached me in confidence with an awkward question they just didn't have anyone else to ask.
The close collaboration of agile teams can intensify the need to know the answers to these questions. Rather than corner a coworker at the bar, come ask me.
 
**Session ground rules**
In this session, well-meaning but clueless-feeling person, you'll get to ask your questions without getting in trouble.
* Chatham House Rules: what happens in session, stays in session.
* Any question is ok, if it comes from a desire to understand.
* It's ok to briefly expose your biases and your ideas, as long as it's to clarify your question.
* No playing Devil's Advocate, and no debating.
 
Feeling pretty comfortable with your knowledge on the subject? Come listen to what those around you have been wondering in silence and consider how you may, if you choose, be a better ally.

Learning Outcomes:
  • In an AMA, the learning outcomes can be quite surprising.
  • If people listen and find the part of the session where I share my story compelling, they will learn about
  • - sexual identity in the workplace, or, when I had to tell a teammate who liked making casual gay jokes that I had a girlfriend in a pairing session
  • - the intersection of gender and sexual identity, or, how being out as a lesbian ended up with me being just one of the boys (mostly)
  • - respectful vocabulary to use with LGBT++ colleagues

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Bonnie Aumann

Bonnie Aumann

Coach | Collaborator, Bluestreak Collaborative | Agile Fluency Project



Thursday August 10, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Wekiwa 5

3:45pm

Patterns from child psychology to build safety in teams: the Circle of Security framework (Matthew Hodgson, Mia Horrigan)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Are you a safe pair of hands? How do you know?? People need to feel secure to explore on their own terms, learn, make mistakes and grow, and so do agile teams. But when the security to learn and fail-fast vanishes, when teams fear failure and punishment, a risk-averse culture can grow -- a culture that can destroy agile initiatives and kills continuous improvement behaviours.
Come and learn about the Circle of Security framework – a psychological research-based approach to creating psychological safety – and an example of its use to deal with agile team dysfunction, strengthen trust and help build a learning culture in teams. The presentation will be in a workshop format. Together we'll work through a number of activities to help you:
  • Define psychological safety and trust –- applying child psychology patterns to team dynamics.
  • The cultural and personality factors that affect psychological trust -- what does hierarchy and vulnerability really have to do with feeling safe?
  • The relationship between safety, learning, failing and successful agile teams.
  • Manage the conflict between learning culture and fear of risk risk-taking -– understanding the critical relationships between learning, failure and risk avoidance.
  • Recognise false cues from team members -- what learning and feedback loops look like, from the behavioural perspective of safety and fear, as Agile Retrospectives.
  • Strengthen team relationships -– building empathy by understanding others history, worries, stresses, joys, and hopes.
  • Understand the relationship between team effectiveness and team learning -- what to do as a coach, manager or team member to build and support psychological safety
  • How to be a safe pair of hands for your agile team without devolving into micromanagement or removing their need to be self-organising.

Learning Outcomes:
  • The Circle of Security framework -- how leaders, coaches, managers and even team members can use the to build and support psychological safety
  • The science on the relationship between psychological safety and the learning behaviour critical to agile teams' continuous improvement
  • How to recognise team needs for trust, comfort, support and risk-taking as well as its antecedents -- fear of failure, stonewalling and defensiveness
  • Cross-cultural psychology and personality factors -- do you really need to be 'vulnerable' or is this just pop-psychology?
  • What secure attachment looks like in teams
  • What to do to build secure attachment that will underpin psychological safety within a team and reinforce learning behaviours over risk avoidance

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Hodgson

Matthew Hodgson

Lead Partner for Enterprise Agile Transformation, Zen Ex Machina
Matthew has been using psychology to further ICT cultural change goals for 20 years. He is a contributing author to the books 'The Emergence of the Relationship Economy' and 'The Psychology of Aid' and continues to publish in international journals in the fields of psychology on the... Read More →
avatar for Mia Horrigan

Mia Horrigan

CEO and VP Product Management and Advisory Services, Zen Ex Machina
Mia is an experienced Enterprise Agile Coach and Senior Program Manager with over 15 years senior executive experience leading and implementing ICT programs and projects including digital transformations, from planning through to development and implementation. Mia’s experience... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Wekiwa 9&10

3:45pm

When Worlds Collide: Regulatory Compliance meets Lean-Agile Development (Stephen Mayner, Harry Koehnemann)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Achieving Regulatory and Industry Standards Compliance with the Lean-Agile at Scale
Many systems in aerospace, defense, automotive, medical, banking, and other industries have an unacceptable social or economic cost of failure. These systems are also subject to extensive regulatory oversight and rigorous compliance standards. Historically, organizations building these systems have relied on comprehensive quality management systems and stage-gate based waterfall life-cycle models to reduce risk and ensure compliance. These same organizations are now adopting lean-agile methods, and are struggling to understand how their existing stage-gate compliance activities participate in a lean-agile flow of value.
In this presentation, Dr. Harry Koehnemann with 321Gang and Dr. Steve Mayner from Scaled Agile, Inc. will show how to align the goals and practices of those who build high-assurance systems with those who must assure those systems. They will demonstrate how several lean-agile principles produce better compliance outcomes by:
  • Taking an incremental approach to creating and assessing compliance information
  • Including compliance teams and their concerns in the product development ecosystem to collaborate on planning, executing, assessing, and adapting.
  • Incorporate compliance in agile quality practices – automating, adapting, continuously improving, etc.
  • Integrating V&V and compliance activities into iterative development flow

Learning Outcomes:
  • Explain how compliance objectives in high assurance environments are aligned with Lean-Agile principles and practices
  • Know the distinctions between PRODUCT and PROCESS compliance requirements
  • Improve compliance, verification, and validation outcomes through iterative and incremental implementation
  • Understand organizational alignment and collaboration strategies for early and continuous feedback on compliance
  • Apply specific technical practices that increase quality and compliance through automation

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Steve Mayner

Steve Mayner

Scaled Agile, Inc., Scaled Agile, Inc.
Dr. Steve Mayner is an executive coach and Lean-Agile evangelist with a passion for cultivating transformational leaders and high performing teams. His 30-year career in business includes roles as Vice President in multiple Fortune 500 companies, as well as Chief Technology Officer... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
H4

3:45pm

Mapping Experiences (David Hendee)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Have you ever wondered what the best way to kick off a new project? Are you a product manager, designer, or team lead that has to wrangle multiple stakeholders and form a cohesive project plan? In this hands-on workshop you will learn how to collaboratively map and analyze a customer journey, and then turn it into an actionable backlog for your next (or current!) product. David Hendee, the Director of Design at Carbon Five, one of the world's leading software development & design firms, will facilitate this workshop based on more than 8 years coaching this exercise for more than 50 clients.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Collaboratively creating an experience map
  • Identifying pain points and ideating solutions
  • Performing a funnel cross-check
  • Transforming an experience map into a story map
  • Creating an Agile milestone plan with design stories

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for David Hendee

David Hendee

Director of Design, Carbon Five
I've been lucky to have been continually surrounded by smart people, working with developers, designers, and business folk to deliver innovative, desirable, and valuable software to customers. I'm passionate about emergent design and group dynamics, and I love building things: models... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Wekiwa 7&8