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Learning [clear filter]
Sunday, August 6
 

3:15pm

First Time Attendee Orientation (Tricia Broderick)

Abstract:
New to the Agile2017? These short half-hour sessions are designed to give you a little “101 Guide” to Agile2017, including insights into ways to get the most out of your experience. There will also be a “Q & A” session at the end in case we miss anything.
There is no pre-registration required for this, or any other session.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Find out how to get the most out of Agile2017


Speakers

Sunday August 6, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Panzacola F1&F2

6:15pm

First Time Attendee Orientation (Tricia Broderick)

Abstract:
New to the Agile2017? These short half-hour sessions are designed to give you a little “101 Guide” to Agile2017, including insights into ways to get the most out of your experience. There will also be a “Q & A” session at the end in case we miss anything.
There is no pre-registration required for this, or any other session.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Find out how to get the most out of Agile2017


Speakers

Sunday August 6, 2017 6:15pm - 6:45pm
Panzacola F1&F2
 
Monday, August 7
 

8:15am

First Time Attendee Orientation (Tricia Broderick)

Abstract:
New to the Agile2017? These short half-hour sessions are designed to give you a little “101 Guide” to Agile2017, including insights into ways to get the most out of your experience. There will also be a “Q & A” session at the end in case we miss anything.
There is no pre-registration required for this, or any other session.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Find out how to get the most out of Agile2017


Speakers

Monday August 7, 2017 8:15am - 8:45am
Panzacola F1&F2

9:00am

Creating Leadership and Engagement at Every Level (David Marquet)

Abstract:
Leadership is not for the select few at the top. In highly effective organizations, there are leaders at every level.
Creating Intent-Based Leadership organizations results in a work place where everyone engages and contributes their full intellectual capacity. A place where people are healthier and happier because they have more control over their work – a place where everyone is a leader.
Intent-Based Leadership organizations create an environment for people to contribute so that they feel valued. They set clear goals so their people know how to do their jobs. They push control and decision making down the organization so people take responsibility and rise to the occasion. They maintain unity of effort by ensuring the supporting pillars of technical competence and organizational clarity are in place.
As a result, they achieve:
• A highly effective organization with superior morale.
• The capacity for greatness in the people and practices of an organization, and remove it from the personality of leaders.
• An organizational culture that creates of additional leaders throughout every level of the organization.
Intent-Based Leadership starts with rejecting the idea that leadership is for the select few at the top and instead embracing in highly effective organizations, there are leaders at every level. This method of leadership is based on empowerment, not ego, and process, not personality.
1. Practical Empowerment: When we give our people more authority, we actually create more effective leaders.
2. Technical Competence: When we engage our minds in what we are doing, we perform with better results.
3. Organizational Clarity: When leaders set clear goals and people know how to do their jobs, we can take deliberate action.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Objectives:
  • • Think afresh about what leadership means.
  • • Practice language that empowers your people.
  • • Understand organizational design in the context of how to push decision making downward.
  • • Commit to change behaviors tomorrow.
  • What you will learn from attending:
  • • How to create an environment where people actively engage and think.
  • • Have a personal commitment to talk with to their co-workers in an empowering way.
  • • Implement the idea of leadership as creating more leaders – not more followers.
  • • Implement the idea of leadership as giving control – not taking control.

Attachments:

Speakers

Monday August 7, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
Gatlin ABC

10:45am

Introduction to Agile: The Genesis (Paul Hammond)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
What is this thing everyone calls Agile? If you have been doing software development a different way your whole career you may be wondering why should I change, what’s so different? In this introductory talk we will define why Agile is more than a process or methodology; it really involves changing your culture to improve your software development. To provide some additional context we’ll also:
  • Look back at how the Agile methods and practices emerged
  • Discuss the Agile Manifesto and 12 Principles and their resulting impact on the way that we do software development today
  • Describe what it’s like to work on Agile Project
  • Describe what you can do next Monday to get started

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn common myths and misconceptions of agile
  • Understand the why behind what we do
  • Understand the importance of identifying your existing culture and how it impacts adopting agile

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Paul Hammond

Paul Hammond

Director of Development, eBay


Monday August 7, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Wekiwa 3&4

10:45am

Following Your Fear: How to do the things you've always wanted to do (Todd Charron)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
What stops you from doing the things you’ve always wanted to do? What stops teams from being truly great? What hinders most Agile transformations?
Fear.
That feeling in your gut when deep down you know what you need to do, but you're not sure if you can do it.
We'll examine how Improvisers and artists handle fear and how you can apply these techniques to yourself and to your Agile teams. How you, as a coach, can create safe environments so that your teams can be fearless.
In addition, we'll work hands on with the Fear Follower Canvas to help you move those things you've always wanted to do from the someday pile to done.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand of fear, how it impedes us, and how we can use it to energize us
  • How improvisers, artists, and other successful individuals deal with fear
  • How to use the Fear Follower Canvas to tackle your own fears and challenges

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Todd Charron

Todd Charron

Agile Coach, Planning for Failure
Todd helps leaders become intentional about their organizational culture, so that they can revolutionize the way they work. Todd combines his background in Improv with over 15 years of experience in the software industry as a Developer, Manager, Agile Coach, and Lean Startup Mentor... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
I4

10:45am

The Things We Don't Say: How Biased Language Crafts Culture (Ash Coleman)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Culture is often framed by what you DON’T say, not necessarily by what you do say.
  • Your company brags of it’s geek gaming culture
  • Part of your company recruiting highlights pub and party nights
  • Strong anecdotal use of sports throughout the training material
These are common examples of well intentioned, but potentially limiting statements about culture that many organizations apply in an attempt to “attract the right fit”. By choosing language that supports an ecosystem that already exists, we may unintentionally deter many complementary candidates who feel they might not be accepted. In addition, we are imposing discrete limits on the organization's ability to adapt and grow based on past success instead of future opportunities.
This is a microcosm of what is occurring around culture within the Agile workspace. While we claim to support the evolution of resilient autonomous teams, a desire to define the culture in explicit marketable terms can create a barrier to entry. Are you really creating culture and fostering an environment for agility, or are you creating exclusive spaces? A lot can be derived from the specific words you use to describe your team, culture and collaboration schemes.
In this workshop, we will explore the use of resilient and inclusive language, that can:
  • Support building stronger, diverse teams,
  • Support an ever evolving Agile culture,
  • Avoid assigned meaning that may alienate individuals through our choice of words… both spoken and unspoken.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Why language around culture can impose unintended limits on opportunities.
  • How the language we choose is connected to our unconscious biases.
  • Inclusion is an intentional act, often initiated to recognize the need for change.
  • Identifying how diversity in teams can provide stronger outcomes through concatenated knowledge.
  • Challenging the notion of an existing, consistent and explicit culture as a desirable (or even possible) thing.


Speakers
avatar for Ash Coleman

Ash Coleman

Head of Diversity & Inclusion for Credit Karma, Credit Karma
A progressive type, Ash focuses her efforts within technology on bringing awareness to inclusion of women and people of color, especially in the Context Driven Testing and Agile communities. Though technology and inclusion have her heart today, engineering was not her first love... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
H2

10:45am

As a whirlwind through the Microsoft DevOps Landscape (Jesse Houwing)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
In the last few years a lot has changed in the Microsoft ecosystem of development tools. Microsoft has embraced a wide range of community supported tools, contributed to open source projects and officially provides support for 3rd party tools that ship with their flagship development products.
With the latest releases of Visual Studio, Visual Studio Team Services and Team Foundation Server, Microsoft is continuing its a movement to bring more and more DevOps tools, collaboration, integration and feedback to the fingertips of the team. The Visual Studio Marketplace further opens up your options by adding support for other languages such as Python, Ruby, PHP as well as and other technologies such as Specification by Example, Powerful refactoring, and more.
In this session Jesse Houwing, Scrum.org trainer and Microsoft MVP DevOps, will present you with an independent view through the options, think of it as a whirlwind introduction to the Microsoft ecosystem and 3rd party tools that make it even better.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the position of the Microsoft tools ecosystem
  • Piece together your own pipeline with all of the options available.
  • Understand the alternative options available and how they can be added in
  • Understand how all of these pieces together form a powerful end-to-end solution with traceability from inception to production.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jesse Houwing

Jesse Houwing

Speaker, Techorama
Jesse is a passionate trainer and coach, helping teams improve their productivity and quality all the while trying to keep work fun. He is a Professional Scrum Trainer (PST) through Scrum.org for the Professional Scrum Foundations (PSF), Professional Scrum Master (PSM), Developer... Read More →



Monday August 7, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Wekiwa 6

10:45am

DevOps Performance Measurement: A Foundational Element For Building High-Trust Cultures (Dennis Ehle)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
One of the primary drivers, if not THE central driver, behind any Enterprise DevOps transformation is the organizations need to optimize the flow of business value (in the form of incremental software) between developers and end-users. Within many organizations, and particularly within larger enterprise organizations, lack of trust between organizational stakeholders tends to sub-optimize the flow of value.
This technology agnostic talk will explore how organizations such as Aflac, Boeing, BNSF Railways, Service Master and Fanatics were able to dramatically accelerate evolution from low-trust to high-trust cultures. The common thread between these organizations is how they leverage data-driven instrumentation to dispel myths, break down organizational/political barriers and guide trust-building transformation.
What is DevOps Performance Measurement?
  • Value Stream Performance vs Operational Performance - Precisely measuring the DevOps machine itself and not it’s outputs
  • How to describe DevOps performance using measures the entire organization truly cares about:
    • The Flow of Value
    • Delivery Risk
    • Process Compliance
    • Rework
Data is Truth: Why DevOps Performance Measurement is so critical to building trust across the enterprise?
  • How objective data can diffuse and ultimately eliminate the blame game
  • Removing corporate politics with the ultimate equal opportunity enabler
  • The relationship between Batch size and Trust
  • Leveraging objective performance insights to foster organizational creativity
  • Using metrics to create shared incentives and common agenda’s
  • Quantitative results speak best to executive leadership
It all starts with Value Stream Mapping
  • What is The DevOps Unit of Flow?
  • Phases, Activities and Controls - DevOps specific templates and guidelines to simplify value stream mapping
  • Manual vs automated activities
Top Ten DevOps Performance Metrics That Raise Organizational Trust (including…)
  • Activity duration and DevOps Wait-Time
  • Value Stream Bottleneck Analysis
  • Release Candidate and/or Feature Risk Analysis
  • Waste and Rework Metrics
  • Quality Assurance Effectivness Index
  • Measuring Code Stability/Complexity by Feature or Release
  • Real-time compliance measurement
Some Lessons Learned:
  • Choose Measures Wisely: Trust can only be gained when adopting DevOps performance metrics that are organizational strategic and highly valued by business stakeholders. Stay high level and business focused.
  • Operational metrics such as broken-build percentage, deployment frequency and test coverage can lead to sub-optimal behavior and a reduction in trust.
  • The initial performance baseline is not good or bad - it is the foundation for future improvement.
  • Warning: The data must guide investment in people, process and tools - adopting a course of investment despite the data can nullify the entire effort.
Note: This presentation is vender and technology independent. Our findings are based on direct experience gathered from over a dozen performance measurement engagements with enterprise sized customers.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to effectively map value streams in the context of DevOps
  • How to distinguish between metrics and measures that build trust and those that erode trust
  • Technology agnostic approaches to tracking business value (in the form of incremental software capabilities) thru the delivery value stream
  • How performance metrics can help identify DevOps waste and sub-optimization
  • How to use common DevOps data to objectively measure delivery risk - before software is released

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Dennis Ehle

Dennis Ehle

VP DevOps Strategy, VersionOne


Monday August 7, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
H4

10:45am

Viewing The Organization as Complex Adaptive System-An Approach To Enhancing Agility (Sunil Mundra)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
One of the biggest challenges for Enterprises today is dealing with constant and rapid change happening all around them. The change is so disruptive that no Enterprise, regardless of age and size, can take their survival for granted. However, nature and humans have dealt with change very effectively since time immemorial. Systems like Weather, Economies and even the Human Body are highly adaptable to a rapidly changing environments. These systems, known as Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS), have grown resilient by thriving on change.
So when we have systems all around us which are effectively dealing with Change, can Enterprises learn from CAS about dealing with change. The answer is a resounding 'Yes'! While adopting Agile Values and Principles are helping organizations not only cope with change but also leverage it, the understanding of CAS and how they deal with change will certainly help Enterprises enhance Agility.

Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Understand the model of Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS), and how they deal with change effectively
  • 2. Learn the similarities between 21st Century Enterprises and CAS
  • 3. Gain insights about the characteristics of CAS
  • 4. Learn the difference between 'Complicated' and Complex', and how the 'Complicated' model is an impediment to Enterprise Agility
  • 5. Understand how Enterprises can deal with the challenges arising from Change and enhance Enterprise Agility, by adopting the CAS model

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Sunil Mundra

Sunil Mundra

Principal Consultant, Thoughtworks
Sunil Mundra is a Principal Consultant at ThoughtWorks. His areas of expertise include consulting on Agile Adoption and Transformation, Agile Maturity Assessment, Agile Training and Coaching, and Distributed Development. Sunil speaks regularly at national and international level... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
F1

10:45am

Beyond the Underpants Gnomes: Why Kanban Stalls and How to Restart It (Cheryl Hammond)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
You put up your Big Visible Display. Maybe you even limited WIP, or argu^H^H^H^Htalked about limiting it. Something more was supposed to happen. Why didn't more happen? If your Kanban implementation feels like this...
Phase 1: Collect underpants Phase 2: ? Phase 3: Profit ... you're not alone. The Underpants Gnomes can be a scourge of Kanban. Fortunately, they don't have to have the last word.
In this session, you'll learn how to detect Underpants Gnomes in your organization's Kanban process, and how to combat them. We'll investigate three concrete solutions—by-the-book, and beyond—and fill your toolbox with simple, proven strategies for restarting your Kanban after it stalls.
You're ready for the real Phase 2. Downsize the Underpants Gnomes and let's get started!

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to recognize a stalled Kanban implementation
  • Three specific techniques for restarting stalled Kanban

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Cheryl Hammond

Cheryl Hammond

Delivery Lead, Agile Practice Leadership Enablement, Pivotal
Cheryl Hammond, a.k.a. bsktcase, has a couple decades' experience as a software developer in the private and public sectors. She led her team's successful adoption of Scrum-ban for a mission-critical regulatory compliance project under multi-agency state and federal government oversight... Read More →



Monday August 7, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
F3

10:45am

How Machine Learning Will Affect Agile Testing (Paul Merrill)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Machine Learning is all the rage. Companies like Google, Amazon, and Microsoft are investing extreme sums of money into their ML budgets. But what is it, and more importantly, how will it affect me, as an Agile tester? As a Scrummaster? As a developer on an Agile Team?
Last year, I was at a testing conference where a group of 5 executives decreed adamantly that ML would replace testers within the next few years. Anytime 5 executives agree on anything I question it! So I wanted to learn if they were right. Over the last few months, I’ve researched and learned about ML. I’ve talked with industry experts in the field and testers with expertise in ML. I wanted to know what they had to say about this decree. I wanted to know for myself, "is testing in danger of being automated by ML?"
Join me to learn what Machine Learning is, How it is affecting the software we build, the products we use and our ability to test our applications. Learn what I’ve found in my research, to get an introduction to ML, and to decide for yourself if the future of testing will be in the hands of ML algorithms.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Gain knowledge of what experts in ML are saying about how it will affect Agile Testing,
  • Take home an introductory understanding of ML,
  • Enough knowledge to decide for yourself if the future of agile testing will be in the hands of ML algorithms.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Paul Merrill

Paul Merrill

Principal Software Engineer in Test, Beaufort Fairmont
Paul Merrill is Principle Software Engineer in Test and Founder of Beaufort Fairmont Automated Testing Services. Nearly two decades into his career spanning roles such as software engineer, tester, manager, consultant and project manager, his views on testing are unique. Paul works... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
F4

2:00pm

Creating an Environment for Successful Agile Teams (Esther Derby)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Some teams seem to have some mysterious chemistry from the beginning. Other teams wallow, bicker, and slog their way to uncertain results. What makes one team soar, and another stumble? It's not just chance.
In this session, you'll experience what it's like to work on a team that is set up for success--or one that starts with the deck stacked against them. We'll explore the essential ingredients that result in that mysterious "chemistry." For example, we’ll examine the prerequisites for cohesion, and factors that pull teams apart. We'll look at myths and realities of software teams.
You'll gain tools to assess your agile team, and insights on how to adapt the environment for growing great teams.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify the essential elements for great teams.
  • Strategies to adapt the environment to improve the chance of team success.
  • Identify common pitfalls for agile teams.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Esther Derby

Esther Derby

Founder, esther derby associates, inc.
I draw on four decades of experience leading, observing, and living through organizational change. In 1997, I founded esther derby associates, inc. and work with a broad array of clients from Fortune 500 companies to start ups. My approach blends attention to humans and deep knowledge... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Wekiwa 3&4

2:00pm

Overcoming Resistance: How to Engage Developers in Agile Adoption (David Frink)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Have you heard a developer on an agile team say something like this?
“Agile has too many meetings”
“I just need to get back to my real work”
“Why should I change, the old way works fine”
“It’s not my job to test”
If you’ve heard these, your developers (and possibly their managers) have some resistance to your agile practices.
This has probably led you to ask, “Why are developers disengaged? Why don’t they support this transformation? Why won’t they help us succeed? How can I reach them?”
Combining his experience as an agile Development Manager and Coach with wisdom from the fields of psychology, communication, negotiation and behavioral economics, David will provide techniques to better understand, communicate with and engage developers.
This session is for Scrum Masters, Product Owners, Coaches or anyone who needs techniques to engage developers (or other reluctant team members) in the agile process.
Participants will come away from this session with specific, actionable techniques they can use to better engage the developers they work with.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - Identifying common disengagement and resistance patterns
  • - Insight into the “developer’s mind”
  • - How to get past the surface of resistance and into the root of the problem
  • - Techniques to get developers (and others) off the sidelines and engaged in the process

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for David Frink

David Frink

Lead Agile Coach, Fidelity
David is a reformed developer and manager and is a Lead Agile Coach with Fidelity in Raleigh, NC. Through his 20+ years of experience he\'s solved complex technical and organizational challenges and helped teams as they embrace and wrestle with agile adoption at various scales.David... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
H2

2:00pm

Make the agile transition work! And what HR can do to support it… (Maike Goldkuhle)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
During an agile transition the change of mindset, leadership behavior and the shift of responsibilities to many are key elements. Usually a company would work very hard on delivering this message, training people and make sure, they understand this new philosophy. But when it comes to daily business, the employee needs to see structural and process changes, too, to receive guidance and boundaries. Furthermore, they need to see that the agile transition is something that not only takes place in mindset but also happens in reality. He needs to feel safe when acting based on the new philosophy. Feeling safe is something that they will only experience when the new definitions, rules, guidelines and boundaries are also made explicit. Quite often those structural and more tangible changes will only follow after a while. During this period confusions and fallback into old habits may arise.
And here the contribution from HR can and needs to start! Become involved and proactive: Understand what agile transition means and immediately start changing old systems and processes. Develop and offer new tools whenever needed to support the new way of working and thinking. Emphasize the wanted behavior and work methodology in guiding the teams through three stages with your new tools.
The speech will describe the benefit of the listed three phases and concrete tools and guidance on how to implement them:
1. Sharing (feedback) is caring
a. Throw away your old manager – employee dialogues
b. Implement team feedback
c. Let the teams do their feedback dialogues themselves
 Team feedback for social competencies
 Team feedback for technical and skill competencies
Learn how to and helpful tools
  1. Reduce hierarchical thinking
    a. Throw away processes that the manager usually owned
    b. Let the team take ownership
    c. Implement team review and team approval processes
     Vacation planning
     Team training budget
     Recruiting and onboarding new employees through the team
    Learn how to and helpful tools
  2. Break with old (or common) rules
    a. Throw away old processes for salary raises/adjustments
    b. Standardize and objectify salary adjustments procedures
    c. Build them on team feedback and benchmark reviews
     Team Bonus
     Merit Money
    Learn how to and helpful tools

Learning Outcomes:
  • This session is about new systems and processes HR should set up and why they will make a difference. I will explain how you can introduce them step by step and what needs to be considered, based on my experiences.
  • • At the end the audience should feel value through my report as
  • o they have learnt new tools that can be useful for self-managed teams
  • o they will include HR into the agile transition and see value in doing so
  • o they have learnt that the sooner you change systems, structures and processes, the better and faster the transition will become

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Maike Goldkuhle

Maike Goldkuhle

HR Business Partner, Avira
I worked as Global Director of HR at a company that decided to transform their classical working technology teams into agile working and cross-functional business teams. During this transition the CTO decided to take out all manager roles of the newly set up teams. During that time... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
H3

2:00pm

Getting a Proposal Accepted at Agile2017: A Collaborative, Agile Approach (Skylar Watson, Jeff Langr)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Have you ever worked hard on preparing for a conference proposal only to be rejected?
With 2500 attendees and 300+ speakers, the Agile conference is the largest of its kind. Getting accepted as a speaker is a challenge and an honor, as over 600 proposals were submitted for 2017. Good luck with that! It’s tough getting accepted, and we’ve tallied up numerous, stinging rejections.
We can help! Improve your odds by following our patent-pending, highly collaborative approach for drafting a proposal. And since you’re reading this… it worked!
This presentation provides a path to getting your proposal accepted using a variety of Agile toolbox techniques. You'll learn about collaborative brainstorming, story mapping, proposal writing, building out and ultimately delivering the presentation. These techniques address the barriers to entry that can constrain potential future thought leaders--like you--from finding an audience.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate how collaborative writing can be an effective tool for getting a talk approved
  • Understand how to iterate on Kent Beck’s success as he describes in “How to Get a Paper Accepted at OOPSLA”
  • Learn how early, public feedback can increase your likelihood of success
  • Demonstrate how story mapping can craft an effective presentation
  • Learn how to effectively communicate technically complex details to a broader audience

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Langr

Jeff Langr

Owner, Langr Software Solutions, Inc.
Jeff Langr has been professionally building software for over a third century. He is a contributor to Clean Code and the author of 5 books on software development: Pragmatic Unit Testing in Java 8 with JUnit, Modern C++ Programming with Test-Driven Development, Agile in a Flash, Agile... Read More →
avatar for Skylar Watson

Skylar Watson

Independent Consultant
Skylar Watson is a software consultant and owner of SkyNet software solutions where he implements high value software to satisfy customers needs. Skylar works with companies both domestically and internationally providing assistance on adopting agile software practices.


Monday August 7, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
F4

2:00pm

'Failure' As Success In An Agile World: The Mindset, The Methods & The Landmines (J. Paul Reed)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
"Failing fast," "failing forward" and "Learning from failure" are all the rage in the tech industry right now. The DevOps company "unicorns" seem to talk endlessly about how they reframe "failure" into success. And yet, many of us are still required to design and implement backup system capabilities, redundancies, and controls into our software and operations processes. And when those fail, we cringe at the conversation with management that will ensue.
So is all this chatter of reframing "failure" as success within our organizations just that: talk? And what does "reframing failure" look like, anyway? And what does any of this have to do with aircraft carriers and nuclear power plants?! Join us as we explore shifting our mindset of failure, the history that mindset is rooted in, and effective methods to move your organization toward thinking of failure differently, plus some landmines to avoid along the way.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How "safety science" relates to software development and operations
  • Methods and strategies to facilitate your organization's embrace of failure, so you can effectively learn from it and improve
  • Various pitfalls to avoid when organizations attempt to tackle failure differently

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for J. Paul Reed

J. Paul Reed

Managing Partner, Release Engineering Approaches
J. Paul Reed has over fifteen years experience in the trenches as a build/release engineer, working with such storied companies as VMware, Mozilla, Postbox, Symantec, and Salesforce. In 2012, he founded Release Engineering Approaches, a consultancy incorporating a host of tools... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Wekiwa 6

2:00pm

DevOps: an adoption model based on Maslow's Hierarchy (Nicolas Paez)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
DevOps is getting more and more popular everyday, its benefits sound very attractive. You want to give it a try but you don't know where to start. Maybe you already started but you are not sure how to continue. So this session is for you. It presents a model to fully understand the DevOps mindset and how to implement its associated practices. The model is based on an analogy with Maslow's hierarchy of needs and proposes a hierarchy of practices to adopt a DevOps strategy. As you may imagine you can not expect to work in a "DevOps-way" if you don't have some basic practices in place like continuous integration and retrospectives. So this model will allow you to identify your current location in the hierarchy and it will allow you to design a clear path through the hierarchy of DevOps practices.

Learning Outcomes:
  • * Understanding of the different practices involved in any DevOps initiative
  • * Assessment tool to identify your "actual location" in the hierarchy
  • * Strategies to incrementally "move" through the hierarchy of practices to embrace a DevOps mindset in your organisation

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Nicolas Paez

Nicolas Paez

Profesor, UBA & UNTREF
I am a software engineer with several years of experience in software development. I love teaching, I teach software engineering at the university. I work as an independent software engineer helping teams to adopt technical practices.I do believe that the main complexity in creating... Read More →



Monday August 7, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Wekiwa 9&10

2:00pm

Training from Outside the Room (Marian Willeke, Scott Marsee)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Training is an important aspect of the learning process. We have Sharon Bowman's brilliant work in "Training from the Back of the Room" helping us be better … in a box. A room. A single space of time.
However, this is not sufficient to achieve your potential as either individuals or organisations. The best organisations have embraced a culture of continuous learning. It's outside the room. Learning is a mindset evident in everyday behaviours and drives the decisions people make. These companies have extended the agile concepts of continuous integration, automation, and deep customer focus beyond their software development work and into their coaching and L&D organisations' mindset.
So how do we get our companies to that point? Learning is the single largest constraint to us to achieving the agility we seek, yet learning too often remains constrained by the "day of training" mindset. This workshop introduces and helps you explore learning strategies to help you make the science of learning a part of your organisational strategy. Together, we will practice designing systemic, culturally embedded learning using topics relevant to your organisation.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Discover that long-term competitiveness requires a culture of continuous learning.
  • Develop a continuous learning mindset as a part of your organisational strategy.
  • Explore the behaviours and habits that instil learning into your culture.
  • Design learning based on Agile practices and education science to be incremental in short focused bursts that involve sharing and experimentation.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Scott Marsee

Scott Marsee

Learning Coach, Rabbit Hole Learning
It is my belief that a culture of learning is critical for helping organizations pivot quickly to meet the needs of their stakeholders. I am passionate about helping organizations fully integrate team learning that is flexible and transformative.
avatar for Marian Willeke

Marian Willeke

Director, Rabbit Hole Learning
It is my belief that our potential for agility is limited only by our capacity for learning, and in that, we must intentionally integrate a learning culture into the overall organisational strategy in order to be more responsive than competitors. Talk to me about why tackling... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
I2

2:00pm

The Agile PMO: six things you need to nail (Joshua Arnold)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
What does the PMO actually do in an agile, learning organisation?

The leading vs dragging PMO
In many organisations the PMO tends to be part of the problem rather than part of the solution. They tend to frustrate attempts to improve agility that come from either bottom-up team level adoption of agile and top-down desires to improve organisational agility. A lot of the changes that come from adopting agile have a habit of breaking the mold that the PMO is used to. We tend to see a shift from the left-hand side to the right-hand side of this list:

Less of this, more of that
In 140 characters:
. Plan —> Forecast
Resources —> Teams
Push —> Pull
Reqmnts —> Expmnts
Projects —> Initiatives
Dates —> CostOfDelay
— Joshua J. Arnold (@joshuajames) September 7, 2016
Leading change vs defending status quo
Unless they’ve been hiding under a rock for the last decade or so, the teams already get this. In my experience, senior managers also get it. Although they may not use this language they do understand the need to change the culture. The PMO tends to get stuck in the middle though, defending old-skool, outdated thinking that doesn't fit the new more agile world of software and product development. Often they just don’t know any different and they’re using what they’ve been taught as “best practice”.
The thing is, the PMO, with it’s wider portfolio level view of teams is actually well-positioned to really add value and improve the system as a whole. But maybe they don’t know how they could be helping? Based on many years helping organisations from Maersk Line to Starbucks, public and private sector I'll lay out an informed view of the six things the PMO should be more focused on.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand how the PMO is well-placed to add value in an agile organisation
  • Learn 6 things an Agile PMO needs to nail
  • Advice for agile PMOs: (More of this, less of that)


Speakers
avatar for Joshua Arnold

Joshua Arnold

Engineer, blackswanfarming.com
With a background in fluid mechanics and systems engineering, Joshua has worked for the past decade with various organisations to improve their systems of innovation and delivery. In particular, Joshua has focused on the problem of prioritisation and portfolio management, helping... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
F3

2:45pm

Can you develop avionic products in Agile? (Inbar Oren, Yael Man)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Can you build high assurance systems in Agile? Can you upgrade aircrafts, develop head-mounted devices and design highly complex systems using lean principles?
Many have relegated Agile development to small software teams, but at Elbit we have taken the leap.
This talk will describe the journey we took from a few software teams doing scrum to whole solution lines build some of the world most advanced systems using Lean and Agile principles. We'll describe the challenges we faced in reorganizing around value, changing the roles and responsibilities of leaders and building a new culture of learning and excellence.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • • Agile works to build systems at scale in multidisciplinary teams
  • • Change is hard, for software engineers as well as hardware engineers
  • • Coaching is critical at all levels
  • • Process metrics and short term wins are essential
  • • Cooperation with both the business units and manufacturing is a key element in the success of Lean-Agile in systems
  • • Don’t forget the basics – lean principles
  • • Management support is not enough, management leadership is a must

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Yael Man

Yael Man

Senior Director Lean Engineering, Elbit Systems


Monday August 7, 2017 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Wekiwa 1&2

3:45pm

Business Agility - Value Based Planning (Kimberly Scribner, Jeff Howell)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Agile is about helping businesses and people embrace change and complexity. An agile business implementation can also be one of the most difficult cultural changes an organization will experience. Connecting how a business can gain value from an agile implementation is important to the implementation's success. Want to be a key change agent and ready to prepare your organization to inspect and adapt quickly?
This session is focused on those looking to take agile principles beyond software development. If you are an internal agile champion looking to expand the agile footprint within your business or new to agile and just beginning your transformation you will come away with key take away items to get you moving down the right path.
We'll focus on:
  • Understanding the principles behind the manifesto
  • The cadence of a non-software specific initiative and how to make sense of it for all parts of your business
  • Knowing when agile principles can help on large initiatives as well as growing and managing strategy for a business
  • Taking a value based approach to planning
  • Inspecting and adapting quickly
We'll show techniques for taking a value based planning approach to deliver improved results for your business. This session will include a workshop to develop a value based backlog for a problem your business is currently facing.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Following this workshop attendees should be able to:
  • - Understand the key Agile Business Values and how to apply them
  • - What type of initiatives Agile concepts can be most helpful with
  • - Clearly define key values for an initiative
  • - Break down those values into critical success factors in the form of epics
  • - Build and execute on an ordered list focused on those values

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Howell

Jeff Howell

Technical Product Manager, Deluxe Corp


Monday August 7, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
F3

3:45pm

How to be a Great Agile Product Owner - Lowell Lindstrom (Lowell Lindstrom)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Development teams are having success delivering in smaller increments and welcoming changing requirements. A key enabler for this capability is a prioritized product backlog with clear criteria for success. Unfortunately the world does not present itself to the team in this orderly fashion. That's where you, the Product Owner come in.
As the Product Owner, your actions and decisions determine what will be achieved through the development teams efforts.
  • Will the users be delighted to experience your product everyday?
  • Will those that funded the effort look back on a great investment?
  • Do the team of people that developed the product feel an immense sense of fulfillment from having been part of the endeavor?
Achieving that is a tall order, but that is what great Product Owners do. You can be a great Product Owner by understanding the role and following a few key disciplines.
This session will introduce the participants to the Product Owner role.   We will cover:
• The evolution of the role, so that you can cut through the noise and focus on being successful in the role
• The mindset required to maximize the impact agile has on your organization
• The practices and skills that enable a success
• future trends to look for during the rest of conference and beyond
You’ll leave this session with deep understanding of the Product Owner role and how to successfully fulfill the role on your agile efforts.

Learning Outcomes:
  • * describe the role the Product Owner plays in an agile working environment
  • * understand different organizational models for Product Ownership
  • * define and work effectively with your product's community of people, from stakeholder to developers
  • * express vision and strategy for your effort
  • * reduce work to small increments using users stories and similar techniques
  • * use different techniques and metrics to validate that value is being delivered


Speakers
avatar for Lowell Lindstrom

Lowell Lindstrom

Founder, The Oobeya Group


Monday August 7, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Wekiwa 3&4

3:45pm

Introduction to Assumptions Mapping (David Bland)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Lean Startup is bridging the gap between Design Thinking and Agile. While teams are embracing experimentation, it is important that your teams don't waste all of their time running experiments on unimportant and known aspects of your product. Assumptions Mapping is an exercise that gives you the power to facilitate a conversation with your team and enable them to focus on what matters. If you find yourself in an organization trying to adapt to conditions of extreme uncertainty, this workshop gives you actionable tools and advice that you can take back to your teams and apply right away.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to use Assumptions Mapping to illustrate risk & focus your experimentation
  • How Lean Startup is bridging the gap between Design Thinking and Agile
  • What leadership and facilitation styles you'll need for Lean Startup and Design Thinking to thrive in your organization


Speakers
avatar for David Bland

David Bland

Founder, Precoil
David founded Precoil in 2015 to focus on helping both startup founders and enterprise leaders rapidly find product market fit. He's pioneering a new breed of facilitative consulting by blending together Design Thinking, Lean Startup and Agile to make products that matter. Previously... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
I3

3:45pm

AppSec from the Trenches: Practical Application Security for an Agile and DevOps world (Abhay Bhargav)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
DevOps practices have become the de-facto approach to deliver applications at rapid scale and unprecedented speed. However, any process is as fast as its biggest bottleneck and security is becoming the most pervasive bottleneck in most DevOps practices. Teams are unable to come up with security practices that integrate into the DevOps lifecycle and ensure continuous and smooth delivery of applications to customers. In fact, security failures in DevOps amplify security flaws in production as they are delivered at scale. If DevOps should not be at odds with security, then we must find ways to achieve the following on priority:
  • Integrate effective threat modeling into Agile development practices
  • Introduce Security Automation into Continuous Integration
  • Integrate Security Automation into Continuous Deployment While there are other elements like SAST and Monitoring that are important to SecDevOps, my talk will essentially focus on these three elements with a higher level of focus on Security Automation. In my talk, I will explore the following, with reference to the topic:
  • The talk will be replete with anecdotes from personal consulting and penetration testing experiences.
  • I will briefly discuss Threat Modeling and its impact on DevOps. I will use examples to demonstrate practical ways that one can use threat modeling effectively to break down obstacles and create security automation that reduces the security bottleneck in the later stages of the DevOps cycle.
  • I firmly believe that Automated Vulnerability Assessment (using scanners) no matter how tuned, can only produce 30-40% of the actual results as opposed to a manual application penetration test. I find that scanning tools fail to identify most vulnerabilities with modern Web Services (REST. I will discuss examples and demonstrate how one can leverage automated vulnerability scanners (like ZAP, through its Python API) and simulate manual testing using a custom security automation suite. In Application Penetration Testing, its impossible to have a one size-fits all, but there’s no reason why we can’t deliver custom security automation to simulate most of the manual penetration testing to combine them into a custom security automation suite that integrates with CI tools like Jenkins and Travis. I intend to demonstrate the use a custom security test suite (written in Python that integrates with Jenkins), against an intentionally vulnerable e-commerce app.
  • My talk will also detail automation to identify vulnerabilities in software libraries and components, integrated with CI tools.
  • Finally, I will (with the use of examples and demos) explain how one can use “Infrastructure as Code” practice to perform pre and post deployment security checks, using tools like Chef, Puppet and Ansible.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Insight into different processes of Application Security throughout the Agile Development Lifecycle, where Continuous Delivery of apps is the norm
  • Demos of Application Security Test Automation integrated into DevOps processes like Continuous Integration
  • Intro to Iterative Threat Modeling - for Agile

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Abhay Bhargav

Abhay Bhargav

CEO, we45
Abhay Bhargav is the Founder of we45, a focused Application Security Company. Abhay is a builder and breaker of applications. He is the Chief Architect of “Orchestron", a leading Application Vulnerability Correlation and Orchestration Framework. He has created some pioneering works... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
F2

3:45pm

Sketching outside the box: Visual thinking for teams (Angie Doyle, Talia Lancaster)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
People are unique in their ability to communicate abstract concepts using symbols and language. After all, that is where the saying “a picture is worth a thousand words” comes from. So it shouldn’t come as a surprise that expressing yourself visually (as well as verbally) improves the likelihood that others will not only understand what you are trying to say, but also retain the message. A picture has a way of showing ideas and solutions that would have remained hidden if you hadn’t picked up a pen. But a good picture doesn’t eliminate the need for words. It just reduces the number of words we use, so that the ones left behind are the most important…
So why is thinking visually so important?
When working in complex environments and trying to influence change in the workplace, it is essential that we are equipped with the knowledge and tools to tap into different styles of learning. Recent studies show that 65% of people learn and retain information more effectively by seeing words, as well as images. In contrast, only 30% of people learn through verbal communication alone. So if you aren’t one of the 65% of visual learners, someone in your team probably is!
Incorporating visual thinking into your day to day work can reduce the length of meetings by 24% - primarily by providing a shared record of the discussion, effectively stopping "turntable" discussions. A visual record makes it possible to capture the emotions of the conversation, bringing the human element to the forefront making it more likely that the team will remember what was said. Visual Thinking is particularly powerful during facilitated sessions, creative whiteboard discussions, problem solving meetings, as well as in retrospectives to help unpack challenges and serve as a reminder of the actions agreed by the team. Using graphics you can create visual metaphors for the team and help others see the “big picture”.
Luckily, you don’t need to be an artist to think visually! Join us as we co-create a visual vocabulary you can practically apply at work or in your personal capacity (during studying and learning). We will take you through the elements essential for visual thinking, as well as some ideas for visualizing concepts. No power points slides allowed!
This session is for anyone who needs to innovate, invent, analyze, come up with solutions, ideate, solve problems, retain information and build up their confidence to pick up a pen.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Improve your facilitation skills by incorporating visual thinking elements (typography, bullets, color, sequence, faces and people, containers, shading and basic shapes)
  • Learn how to incorporate visual elements into your note taking (otherwise known as sketchnoting or infodoodling)
  • Gain the confidence to overcome your fear to pick up a pen and draw in front of others

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Angie Doyle

Angie Doyle

Agile Coach and Trainer, IQbusiness
Prior to becoming a consultant, I worked in the business process outsourcing industry where I pursued ways to make businesses more effective, more efficient and more capable of adapting to an ever-changing environment. So when I was introduced to Agile a few years later, it was a... Read More →
avatar for Talia Lancaster

Talia Lancaster

Agile Consultant, IQ Business
I have always been a “compulsive note-taker”. In meetings, training and conferences I have always used this as a way to concentrate and understand certain topics. Over the years this doodling has evolved into more of a visual note-taking technique, or sketchnoting.I love that... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Wekiwa 9&10

3:45pm

Cost of Delay for Dummies - What's the value of NOT doing work? (Jenny Swan, Joshua Rowell)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
We LOVE math! But don't worry we are fun too! Learn how to quantify your assumptions on the work coming into your organization.
Come learn how to measure and find value on all work. Properly utilizing the Cost of Delay allows us to make better educated choices for what problems are the best to go solve. This also helps address the problem of having more work than we have people or resources. So understanding the cost of "NOT" doing that work becomes even more important.
When we don't do the work, what does that mean? In this workshop, you'll find the cost of delay to a problem. Then, as a group, use that to identify priorities and build an initial roadmap.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand why value is important, and why we should all understand value the same way
  • We will define Cost of Delay and why it can be a useful tool
  • Learn how to measure Value using Cost of Delay
  • How to apply Cost of Delay to any request
  • Calculate a scheduling value using Cost of Delay Divided by Duration (A form of Weighted Shortest Job First)
  • Using the CD3 how to visualize the priority of work and create a roadmap
  • Take home provided scenarios, example formulas, and their subcomponents

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Joshua Rowell

Joshua Rowell

Product Manager, Game Master, Walmart Stores, Inc
With a love of games, I find constant joy in helping others work better together and fighting the dragons of the real world. This leads to removing waste, automating boring tasks, and uncovering complex problems that require creative teams to solve. It also means building great teams... Read More →
avatar for Jenny Swan

Jenny Swan

Agile Coach / Orchestrator, Wal-Mart Stores, Inc
Ha! I love this question - What should people talk to you about? Um - I am an introvert and a high functioning autistic so talking to NEW people is so awkward for me and probably funny/weird for you. I am like Sheldon Cooper on the Big Bang Theory, except for being genius, I... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
I4

3:45pm

Adapting Information Architecture for Lean and Agile Teams (Rob Keefer)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Do you ever look at your Information Architecture (IA) after the first few weeks of a project? Unlikely. Typically, IA is helpful in the initial design of a project, but unfortunately, it quickly becomes unwieldy and difficult to maintain. A lightweight method to keep the IA up to date would help your team keep the strategic thinking that takes place at the beginning of a project, and use it throughout the entire project.
Enter the DoGo Map. The Do-Go Map is a lightweight IA tool that provides a high-level understanding of the information architecture for a web site, or even a mobile app, and can be easily incorporated into the everyday workflow of a development team - an Agile development team in particular.
This hands-on workshop will present a step-by-step introduction to building a DoGo map. (Cards, Post-Its, and Sharpies will be provided.) The guidance will help participants create a DoGo Map, work with users/stakeholders to evaluate the DoGo Map, and use the DoGo Map to support design decisions.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding the importance of Information Architecture and the value of keeping it current as a system evolves
  • A useful method for creating and maintaining an IA throughout an Agile Project
  • Understand how probabilistic modeling in the IA supports a great user experience

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Rob Keefer

Rob Keefer

Innovation Director, POMIET
Rob Keefer, PhD, is Co-founder and Innovation Director of POMIET, a healthcare systems consulting company. He has 20+ years of experience delivering innovative software solutions along with 12+ years leading Agile teams and implementing approaches for better human/computer interaction... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
F1
 
Tuesday, August 8
 

9:00am

Continuous Delivery Explained (Rachel Laycock)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Jez Humble defines Continuous Delivery as, “The ability to get changes of all types—including new features, configuration changes, bug fixes and experiments—into production, or into the hands of users, safely and quickly in a sustainable way.”
As the first post-agile methodology, the goal of continuous delivery is to have all deployments be so routine that you can do them at any time with no impact to your customers.
Sounds easy!
In fact, to do this, you need to automate and simplify all practices and process from requirements to deployment including, quality assurance and testing, continuous integration, configuration management, environments and deployment, data management, release management and organizational structure. In this session, we’ll introduce theses foundational practices of Continuous Delivery. We’ll delve into the details with practical suggestions on how you can get started and make progress in all foundational areas. Along the way, we’ll suggest some tools that could be used to assist your adoption. Lastly, we’ll discuss some of the challenges and roadblocks that you might encounter when you begin your Continuous Delivery journey.

Learning Outcomes:
  • After this session, you will understand all the practices and processes needed to adopt continuous delivery and have some immediate next steps you can take away to your organization to begin this journey.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Laycock

Rachel Laycock

Lead Consultant, ThoughtWorks


Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
Wekiwa 3&4

9:00am

Art for Agilists - A Visual Thinking Warmup (Alexandra West)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Do strong personalities dominate your development team? Are code reviews painful? Are you blindly following orders from a backlog, or are you learning from observation? This talk will introduce you to Visual Thinking Strategies (or VTS) - an activity that can help get the most from every member of your Agile team.
Visual Thinking Strategies is a cross-disciplinary technique applicable to anyone working in a collaborative setting where observation is key. VTS develops critical thinking skills by viewing and discussing works of art in a group. It is backed by over 30 years of field research showing its effectiveness and accessibility. By allowing individuals to talk about art - without needing a background in the field - VTS advances skills you can use to create more relevant products and stronger teams: Observing, Brainstorming, Speculating, Reasoning with Evidence, Cultivating a Point of View, and Revision & Elaboration.
During this interactive exercise, we’ll discuss selected works of art as a group. There are no right answers or group consensus being sought. We’re creating a safe environment and process for looking, thinking, reasoning and revision - skills that are mission-critical to anyone working in a software design or development role. After our group discussion, participants will learn the basics of image selection and facilitating VTS sessions within their own organizations. In addition to the above, we'll cover how VTS can help you and your team with the following: Comfort with Ambiguity, Openness to the Unfamiliar, Civil Debate, and Willingness to Participate in Group Thinking. VTS's inclusiveness makes it ideal for use within diverse groups, encouraging maximum participation from all members. It is a method that truly values “individuals and interactions over processes and tools.”

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding the history & benefits of Visual Thinking Strategies
  • First-hand experience with the VTS method
  • Basic understanding of how to facilitate VTS sessions

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Alexandra West

Alexandra West

Creative Director/Founder, Nerd/Noir
Alexandra West is a production designer, international speaker, and Creative Director of Nerd/Noir. Her present interest is in bringing a visual thinking mindset into the world of collaborative work. Alex has a long history as a creative. After earning her degree in Art History from... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
H4

9:00am

High Performance via Psychological Safety (Joshua Kerievsky, Heidi Helfand)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Is your culture dominated by fear, blame and other toxic behaviors? Are people protecting themselves rather than pulling together, obsessing over customers and helping your organization succeed? If so, you may have a lack of psychological safety. When it's present, individuals feel safe being vulnerable, safe taking risks, safe making mistakes and safe handling conflict. Long-term high performance depends on psychological safety. It leads to greater transparency, closer relationships, better collaboration and better outcomes. As leaders, it's our duty to develop, model and foster psychological safety. In this interactive workshop, you'll develop skills for growing psychological safety in yourself, your teams and your organization.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn what psychological safety is.
  • Experience techniques for establishing psychological safety.
  • Experience ways to identify and repair mistrust and conflict.
  • Learn to interpret signs of a lack of psychological safety and what to do about it.
  • Understand the research that correlates safety with high performance.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for HEIDI HELFAND

HEIDI HELFAND

Director of Engineering, Procore Technologies
Heidi Helfand is Director of Engineering Excellence at Procore Technologies, creators of cloud-based construction software. Heidi was on the “first team” at ExpertCity, Inc. (acquired by Citrix) where they invented GoToMyPC, GoToMeeting and GoToWebinar and AppFolio, Inc., a SAAS... Read More →
avatar for Joshua Kerievsky

Joshua Kerievsky

Joshua is the CEO of Industrial Logic.  Since the late 1990s, he has been actively practicing and improving Agile methods, from Extreme Programming to Lean Development  and Lean Startup. Joshua is an international speaker and author of the best-selling, Jolt Cola-award winning book... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
I4

9:00am

Design Thinking about Design Thinking (Dan Fuller)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Are you a product owner or a member of an Agile team who is struggling with figuring out what is the most valuable product for your customers? Do you wish you could truly solve your customer's problem and fill a real/actual need for your customers? Are you looking for some frameworks and toolkits above and beyond Scrum and Kanban that can help you get from your product vision down into these valuable items on a product backlog? If you said yes to any of these questions, this is a workshop you won't want to miss.
Design Thinking is based on the radical notion that everyone can think like a designer. What we need to do is unlock the creative confidence that exists in all of us. Design Thinking can provide a way of thinking and a set of tools that can help product owners rapidly ideate through concepts for new products and features, test these concepts using prototypes and rapidly arrive at an ideal state of problem-solution fit before those ideas are then further elaborated on to product backlogs.
In this highly interactive workshop you will get the opportunity to navigate through the five different Design Thinking Modes as you work together on a team to solve a design challenge.
Participants of this workshop will:
(1) Learn about the 7 key Mindsets of Design Thinking including (Show Don’t Tell, Focus on Human Values, Craft Clarity, Embrace Experimentation, Be Mindful of Process, Bias Towards Action, Radical Collaboration).
(2) Understand the 5 Modes of Design Thinking including (Empathize, Define, Ideate, Prototype, Test) as part of a group activity.
(3) Apply some of the many Methods of Design Thinking as part of a group activity.
(4) Gain an understanding of how Design thinking Mindsets, Modes and Methods can be applied as part of an overall Agile Product Management framework to help better understand customer problems and how to ideate and validate potential solutions to those customer problems to achieve problem solution fit.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will learn about the 7 key Mindsets of Design Thinking including (Show Don’t Tell, Focus on Human Values, Craft Clarity, Embrace Experimentation, Be Mindful of Process, Bias Towards Action and Radical Collaboration).
  • Participants will learn about the 5 Modes of Design Thinking including (Empathize, Define, Ideate, Prototype and Test).
  • Participants will get the opportunity to apply some of the many Methods of Design Thinking as part of a group activity.
  • Participants will gain an understanding of how Design Thinking Mindsets, Modes and Methods can be applied as part of an overall Agile Product Management framework to help better understand customer problems and how to ideate and validate potential solutions to those customer problems to achieve problem solution fit.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Dan Fuller

Dan Fuller

Senior Agile Consultant, SolutionsIQ
Dan Fuller has been a management consultant for over 25 years. His current areas of focus include Business Agility, Digital Transformation and Enterprise Innovation. Prior to his Agile consulting experiences, he was a management consultant helping to guide organizations through Digital... Read More →



Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
Wekiwa 6

9:00am

Mob Programming for Continuous Learning (Michael Clement)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
What if we took Extreme Programming and said it’s not “extreme” enough? What if we took pair programming and cranked it to 11? Mob programming is a technique with “all the brilliant people working on the same thing, at the same time, in the same space, and on the same computer.”
Join me on my journey through different development practices and how I landed at mob programming as my preferred way of working. I was lucky enough to be on a team for about year that worked “as a mob.” I’m also now leading a team that is mobbing full time for the past year and using mob programming for workshops and other learning experiences.
Come learn what practices we found to be critical, what obstacles we encountered and what practices became irrelevant during our experience. The pains and successes we had helped us learn and they may help you see a pathway to experimenting with mob programming in your work!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Practices that were difficult for our mob
  • Practices that were critical for our mob
  • How mob programming an be used in a learning/training environment
  • How mob programming helps to build a strong team

Attachments:

Speakers

Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
H2

9:00am

Everything You Wanted to Know About DevOps But Were Afraid to Ask (Claire Moss)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
As a career software tester, I've heard rumors DevOps culture will put me out of a job, so I took a job testing for a DevOps team. I'm new to DevOps, but aren't we all? What matters most is our teams' intentional decisions to grow our DevOps practices along with our development community.
Join me as I share my experiences blending disciplines, companies, levels of experience, and differing expectations as a member of efficient and effective delivery teams. I'll describe common cultural and interpersonal problems I experienced while transforming a cross-functional agile team dogfooding a DevOps implementation.
Whether you're into development, operations, testing, customer support, or product ownership, you'll leave with concrete strategies for improving your DevOps working relationships to keep the technology running smoothly. People factors strongly affect your DevOps technical outcomes, so optimizing your flow includes improving your people practices.
Don't feel afraid to ask about DevOps anymore!

Learning Outcomes:
  • The people factors that strongly affect your DevOps technical outcomes
  • How to blend teams from different companies
  • To sort through process and role differences
  • Apply the Agile mindset in support of DevOps

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Claire Moss

Claire Moss

Developer, Agilist, Tester, ScrumMaster, Product Owner, Agile coach, aclairefication
Agilist working as part of product development teams to support and accelerate development through fast feedback. I help teams to craft more executable user stories. Product backlog creator and groomer with emphasis on progressive elaboration. Front-end Javascript development, back-end... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
Wekiwa 7&8

9:00am

DESIGN ISN'T THE DESIGNER'S RESPONSIBILITY (Emma Carter)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Some people have the misconception that design is just creating ‘pretty pictures’. This is not the case; there is a science to creating the right ‘pretty picture’. Companies need to immerse design across their entire organisation to avoid becoming yesterday’s news. This session will delve deeper into the practical User Experience skills that will aid any member of a development team and will ensure the product you are building is ‘on brand’ and ‘user-centric’.
  • Business Analysts and Quality Analysts will benefit from understanding the finer details of design.
  • Developers will gain empathy for design and a better understanding of how to display content.
  • Quality Analysts will leave knowing how to quickly notice problems with a design before release.
In this talk, you will learn how to ensure the product you are building is ‘on brand’ and ‘user-centric’, and why this is important to ensure the success of your product.

Learning Outcomes:
  • • Design is not the sole responsibility of the designer, it's a team effort.
  • • Different ways to prototype
  • • How to gain empathy and get into the minds of your customers
  • • Understanding some of the finer details of design
  • • How to create delightful experiences for users

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Emma Carter

Emma Carter

Lead User Experience Designer, ThoughtWorks
After running an award winning design agency in the UK for 7 years and being shortlisted for The Thames Valley Chamber of Commerce Entrepreneur of the Year award in 2011, Emma Carter moved to Brisbane Australia and joined ThoughtWorks as the Lead User Experience Designer where she... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
F2

10:45am

Sensemaking Applications for Agile: Combining Qualitative & Quantitative Metrics (Daniel Walsh)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Sensemaking is a form of distributed ethnography where people share stories and add layers of meaning by answering questions about their experience. Unlike other research methods, this approach directly links quantitative data to qualitative experiences. The narrative-based approach is particularly powerful in situations that are dynamic, complex, uncertain, and ambiguous.
While there are several variations of sensemaking methods, this experience report is based on a version adopted from David Snowden (Cognitive Edge). The method bridges the gap between qualitative data (e.g. case-studies, focus group interviews, narratives, 'watercooler' chats, rumors) and quantitative data (e.g. large sample surveys, organizational health questionnaires) by linking stories with answers to questions provided by the participants. The combination of stories and question metadata provides a nuanced and holistic perspective that enables leadership teams to identify emergent patterns and trends in behaviors and perceptions. The approach greatly reduces researcher bias because the participant codifies their own experience instead of a research team or natural language processing algorithm. The technique can be used to capture a large number of stories in order to understand emergent patterns and detect troubling weak signals across a large population. After interesting patterns are identified, the stories provide context that inform action plans and interventions.
This paper will focus on the lessons learned from using sensemaking methods to capture user requirements , sensing impediments to Agile adoption, and understand employee engagement (e.g. intrinsic motivation) and retention (i.e. keeping talented people from leaving). The paper will introduce readers to the sensemaking methodology and will also serve as a case study for others interested in using the approach to sense and effect change within a complex adaptive human system.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Framework development lessons: how to constructing effective narrative signifiers, how to test a framework, the power of naming stories
  • Story collection lessons: set journalling, ask for story champions, link with larger purpose, set up feedback loops, make collection part of the job
  • Intervention design lessons: beware of convenience sampling, how to create safe-to-fail interventions, importance of executive sponsorship

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Walsh

Daniel Walsh

Founder & Principal, FiveWhyz
Dan Walsh is a Founder and Principal of nuCognitive and FiveWhyz.com (a Lean and Agile Coaching Collaborative). He has over a decade of expertise in accelerating product development, driving culture change, and transforming organizations. As a recognized leader in Lean Startup, org... Read More →



Tuesday August 8, 2017 10:45am - 11:15am
Wekiwa 1&2

10:45am

Transforming CA Technologies Marketing through Agile Marketing at Scale (yuval yeret)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
How can large, traditional marketing organizations - those that rely on functional departments, and annual marketing plans / budgets hope to keep up? We believe the answers lie in an Agile approach, and we are working hard to transform our marketing department from a plan / interrupt driven culture to one that can quickly sense and respond to customer needs and market changes.
This is easier said than done in a 350 person organization, but we are finding the solutions are familiar, and are rooted in a scaled agile approach. The key ingredients we have found so far include:
• A servant leadership mindset that lets go of details and actively supports team success
• Full cross-functional agile teams that eliminate the overhead of cross-departmental hand-offs and coordination
• Larger delivery groups organized around a set of solutions that deliver on a larger / holistic value proposition (aka release trains)
• Adaptive value delivery supported by experimentation, measurement, collaborative planning, and transparent execution
Our journey isn’t complete yet, but we are seeing real results. Join Steve Wolfe and Mary Bremel from CA Technologies and Yuval Yeret from AgileSparks to hear about CA’s journey to marketing agility, including key challenges faced and learnings applied along the way.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - Agile Marketing can achieve transformational results for marketing organizations that strive to become more relevant, competitive as they join the digital age.
  • - Agile Marketing is possible not just for small nimble companies but also for large organizations with hundreds of marketers and several legacy siloes.
  • - Blueprint for implementing agile marketing in a classic marketing organization - What are the key practices, how to start, what to pay attention to.
  • - Agile Marketing can apply to marketing groups supporting a certain business as well as cross-corporate initiatives.
  • - Differences between Marketing and Product Development to be aware of when extending Agile towards Marketing in your organization

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Yuval Yeret

Yuval Yeret

Agile|Agile Marketing Lean/Agile Consultant | SPCT | CTO, AgileSparks
Agile/Agile Marketing Lean/Agile Consultant and head of AgileSparks USA - We help people spark Real business agility at scale.


Tuesday August 8, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
F3

10:45am

DevOps Explained (Richard Seroter)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Your company must become software-driven. Why? User experience is king, and software is a fundamental piece of the service that you offer. A big part of getting "good at software" is evolving your delivery approach. This transition is far from easy, especially if you're at a company with entrenched processes and functional silos. In this talk, we'll answer some key questions, including: Does DevOps matter to business performance? What values are non-negotiable when adopting DevOps? How can you break down organizational barriers and improve collaboration? Can you adopt DevOps without blowing up quality or security? What technology is critical when automating the path to production? How do new approaches like Site Reliability Engineering (SRE) and Platform Ops fit in? How do I overcome the inevitable objections within my company? We'll discuss this and more, and you'll walk away with a blueprint for introducing enterprise-scale DevOps into your organization.

Learning Outcomes:
  • What DevOps is all about. How leading companies practice it. What changes you should expect to see when adopting it. The technologies that accelerate success.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Richard Seroter

Richard Seroter

Senior Director of Product, Pivotal
Richard Seroter is a Senior Director of Product at Pivotal, with a master’s degree in Engineering from the University of Colorado. He’s also a Microsoft MVP for cloud, Pluralsight trainer, lead InfoQ.com editor for cloud computing, frequent public speaker, and author of multiple... Read More →



Tuesday August 8, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Wekiwa 3&4

10:45am

So You Want To Go Faster? (Daniel Davis)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
How frequently does a good agile team deploy to production? Not every team is capable of deploying "on every commit". What does it take for a team to even start deploying at the end of each sprint, or each week, or each day?
Most companies don't realize that deploying more frequently often requires both significant technical change as well as cultural change. In this talk, I'll guide you through what it takes to deploy more frequently, both from the technical side of setting up pipelines as well as the organizational side of removing red tape. I'll draw on the unique challenges that teams must overcome at each step of the way, from deploying once a month all the way down to full continuous delivery. If your team has been struggling to go faster, come see how you can change to get there. And if you already are at full continuous delivery, come see how to go even faster than that!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees should leave the talk with a full understanding of the different challenges for deploying at these intervals:
  • - Once per sprint
  • - Every few days
  • - Daily
  • - On Every Commit
  • Attendees should be familiarized with common technical solutions to these problems, including:
  • - Automation through delivery pipelines in Jenkins (or some other CI tool)
  • - Feature toggles and their role in code
  • - The role of automated acceptance testing and smoke testing (especially when you go fast)
  • - Using configuration management tools to create consistency across environments
  • - Strategies for versioning and dealing with "in transition" states
  • Attendees should be able to answer to these common cultural questions:
  • - Does more frequent doesn't equate to more risk?
  • - How do you ensure quality without a dedicated QA team of manual testers?
  • - Who should be responsible for authorizing deployments to production?
  • - Do all deployments deliver functionality?
  • - Are bug counts the only way to measure quality?

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Davis

Daniel Davis

Managing Consultant, Excella Consulting
I love testing, Agile and cats. If any of those things interest you, come find me. If any of those interests overlap (e.g. Agile cats), definitely come find me!



Tuesday August 8, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
H2

10:45am

Portfolio Management In An Agile World (Rick Austin)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
When organizations move to agile for software delivery, there is often tension with traditional portfolio management. This talk will illustrate how an organization can move from traditional portfolio management approaches to one that embraces agile software delivery. Doing so enables organizations to become predictable, improve the flow of value delivered, and pivot more quickly if necessary.
We will demonstrate the use of governance that allows a more adaptive portfolio management approach. We will cover topics that enable agile portfolio management including:
  • Lean techniques for managing flow
  • Effective prioritization techniques
  • Long range road-mapping
  • Demand management and planning
  • Progressively elaborated business cases
  • Validation of outcomes
  • Support for audit and compliance needs
These topics will be illustrated by real-world examples of portfolio management that have been proven over the last five years with a wide range of clients.

Learning Outcomes:
  • * An understanding of how portfolio management can work in an agile software delivery organization
  • * What metrics are relevant in managing flow of value
  • * How to create lightweight business cases
  • * Prioritization using weighted shortest job
  • * How to determine an organization's capacity
  • * How to accommodate the needs of audit, compliance, and architectural oversight

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Rick Austin

Rick Austin

Enterprise Agile Coach, LeadingAgile, LLC
With over 20 years of software development experience, Rick comes to LeadingAgile as an expert in the financial services industry. Rick has worked for such companies as Antipori Software, Integrated Benefit Systems, Fiserv, and Turner Broadcasting. He has experience in applying agile... Read More →



Tuesday August 8, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Wekiwa 6

10:45am

Stop Building Bad Software - Solving the Right Problems and Creating the Right Products (Garren DiPasquale, Matt Wallens)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
There are two common problems that lead to bad software: the project team isn’t aligned on a problem and the customer isn’t involved in the design process.
You end up with a product that the business didn’t ask for, the tech team struggles to deliver and customers don’t want. How do you increase confidence in the direction of your product and work together to build innovative solutions that bring the business, technology, and customers together?
Design by Discovery is a process to understand business goals and customer needs. It isn’t about designing screens or coming up with a final solution. Rather, it’s an efficient way for a project team to gain a shared understanding, explore ideas, and develop a design direction.
You’ll walk away from this session informed, energized, and prepared to apply this knowledge on your projects.
With 37 years of combined experience, Matt & Garren have designed software and services for clients ranging from Fortune 50’s to startups to small businesses. They co-founded Artifact in 2011 and believe one of the secrets to success is to not take themselves too seriously.

Learning Outcomes:
  • What is Design by Discovery?
  • Why is Design by Discovery important?
  • Who owns the discovery process?
  • How do you understand which problem to solve?
  • How can you better understand your users?
  • What are effective and efficient techniques to use?
  • How does Design by Discovery fit into Agile?


Speakers
avatar for Garren DiPasquale

Garren DiPasquale

Co-Founder, Artifact
Garren DiPasquales experience with the design process leads to identifying problems and developing creative solutions that serve a purpose. His process and creative thinking skills have allowed him to design and develop innovative applications and user experiences for clients, including Bank of America... Read More →
avatar for Matt Wallens

Matt Wallens

President, 80 Watts
For more than twenty years, Matt Wallens has researched and designed products for web, desktop, and mobile, and guided clients through project discovery, strategy, and functional design. He works with small to medium-sized businesses and digital agencies to design usable products... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
F4

2:00pm

Agile Development Practices Explained - Scott Densmore (Scott Densmore)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Agile is all about values and not a set of prescriptive 1s and 0s, even for a development team. There are quite a few practices that align to those values and allow the development team to transition to agility in delivery of software. This session will focus on practices that correlate to the values, how they apply and why we do them. It will take a view from both an individual engineer perspective as well as an engineering manager. It will discuss how to apply these practices from an individual team to scaling across multiple teams. This is a journey where the destination is to continually adapting these practices Scott's talk is based on experience in building software large scale software for the cloud and tooling for developers.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand how the practices map to agile values
  • How these practices work together to transition to agility
  • How to get started


Speakers
avatar for Scott Densmore

Scott Densmore

Principal Software Eng Manager, Microsoft


Tuesday August 8, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Wekiwa 3&4

2:00pm

It's All About Me!®: Owning Your Behavior, Improving Your Team (Doc List)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Successful high-performing teams have many common attributes. One is their ability to function together collaboratively. In order to collaborate well, they must communicate effectively and get beyond some of the members' personal biases and quirks.
In this interactive workshop, Doc List shares common problems with behavior, motivation, emotions, and interpretation that frequently get in the way. Participate in exercises that lead you to understand ― and sometimes expose ― your own blind spots and limitations. Challenge your own assumptions, learn about taking ownership of your own feelings and behavior, and articulate the difference between behavior and interpretation.
Along the way, gain a new understanding of intuition and how you're using it in your interpersonal situations. Leave this workshop with a new and clearer understanding of how you've been interpreting others' behavior and acting on those interpretations.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Articulate the difference between behaviors and interpretations
  • Demonstrate tools for effective communication in emotionally-charged situations
  • List some of your own blind spots

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Doc List

Doc List

The Guy, AnotherThought Inc.
I love the interactions between people, the dynamics that impede or encourage high performance, and helping people and teams work through their challenges.


Tuesday August 8, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
I1

2:00pm

Build Better Backlogs Using Behavioral Design (Chris Shinkle)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
We make decisions every day driven by cognitive biases designed to save time and energy. These mental shortcuts serve us well. Marketers have used this knowledge for many years building successful marketing strategies. Armed with the same knowledge, is it possible for us to build better products?
Part of designing a great product is convincing users to behave in a way to reach a specific outcome. Behavior design gives us a model to define and foster behavior change. It provides a method for thinking about forming habits and motivating users. It borrows ideas from behavioral science: the study of why people behave as they do. This design method helps identify critical user stories often missed using conventional methods. Identifying these stories are a must to building lasting products. They link core user needs with business outcomes. These design methods drive products such as Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.
In this talk, we'll explore how to use behavioral design to build a better backlog and design an engagement loop. Chris will share how to integrate these ideas into your Agile development process. You'll leave with practicable steps you can apply to your projects.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Why understanding behavior design is critical to better backlogs and successful products
  • The essential elements of an engagement loop
  • How designing these elements leads to more engaging products
  • How can better prioritize the backlog using these stories
  • How to integrate these ideas into your Discovery and Agile processes

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Chris Shinkle

Chris Shinkle

Director of Innovation, SEP
Chris is a practitioner and maker. He is a thought leader and continually initiates new ideas and continuous improvement at SEP. His experience comes from building products with many large clients in a variety of industries: aerospace, medical, healthcare, finance, etc. He introduced... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
F3

2:00pm

Professionalism and Ethics in Software: Entering Uncharted Territory (Sean Dunn, Chris Edwards)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
The practice of software as an engineering profession has not always held the same weight as other engineering professions: civil, mechanical, electrical. The professional responsibility to the greater public good is much more obvious when life-and-limb are on the line. Aside from specific domains where life and limb DO matter to software (aerospace & medical), the connection between software engineering professionalism and societal responsibility has up until now been vague.
That's changing. In the modern world, Software controls everything we do and the decisions we make can have serious implications on the public interest.
Sean and Chris will bring their background as engineers and their participation in the "Ritual of the Calling of an Engineer" to bring to light the important role engineers have in safeguarding the public. In this interactive session, the speakers will explore several case studies to highlight prominent situations where engineering decisions were overruled by management with disastrous consequences, and they will look at some newer ethical concerns that are unique to the software profession.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Gain a new perspective on the role of a software developer in society.
  • When does the public interest come before personal financial interests?
  • When does your technical expertise leave you especially qualified to consider the public interest?
  • How do you handle a situation where the public's interests are in conflict with those of your employer?


Speakers
avatar for Chris Edwards

Chris Edwards

Software Development Manager, Solium
Chris is a software manager with Solium. Chris has had a variety of roles including developer, manager, Scrum Master and architect. He has a passion for how both technical excellence and transformational leadership can help drive agility.


Tuesday August 8, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
F1

2:00pm

CANCELLED: DevOps Transformation: The next step in Agility (Taghi Paksima)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
DevOps is more than just “dev” plus “ops”. It entails a mind-set shift to embrace the culture of continuous improvement, systems thinking and continuous delivery of business value across the whole value stream and affecting most of the organisation. In this workshop we will be collaboratively explore some of the core tenets of DevOps, primarily as a cultural and organisational transformation. The workshop will help participants gain insight into some of the basic, yet powerful, principles and practices of DevOps, such as streamlining flow of value, continuous delivery, and continuous feedback.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Experiment (through gamification) how DevOps practices and principles can help reduce time-to-market and decrease delivery pain.
  • Learn about DevOps transformation as an extension to Agile and how it will contribute to creating high-preforming organisations.
  • Understand some of the core cultural principles and technical practices of DevOps.
  • Learn about effective habits of DevOps teams to pick and the pitfalls to avoid.


Speakers
avatar for Taghi Paksima

Taghi Paksima

Agile Coach/Agile Engineering Consultant, improuv


Tuesday August 8, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
H3

2:00pm

The Story of LeSS (Bas Vodde)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
This talk is based on story-telling, where Bas will share the creation of LeSS and within that side-track on explaining better how LeSS works. Expect most of the session to be in story format and not in typical introduction to X format.
LeSS is a lightweight (agile) framework for scaling Scrum to more than one team. It was extracted out of the experiences of Bas Vodde and Craig Larman while Scaling Agile development in many different types of companies, products and industries over the last ten years. There are several case studies available and an book describing LeSS in detail.
LeSS consists of the LeSS Principles, the Framework, the Guides and a set of experiments. The LeSS framework is divided into two frameworks: basic LeSS for 2-8 teams and LeSS Huge for 8+ teams. All of these are also available on the less.works website.
LeSS is different with other scaling frameworks in the sense that it provides a very minimalistic framework that enables empiricism on a large-scale which enables the teams and organization to inspect-adapt their implementation based on their experiences and context. LeSS is based on the idea that providing too much rules, roles, artifacts and asking the organization to tailor it down is a fundamentally flawed approach and instead scaling frameworks should be minimalistic and allowing organizations to fill them in.

Learning Outcomes:
  • See why experimenting is a key to improvement
  • Learning the difference between component and feature teams.
  • Understanding the difficult problem of owning vs renting processes
  • Understand the LeSS Frameworks and the LeSS 'complete' picture
  • Seeing why organizational complexity - added roles, processes and artifact - is harmful for agility.


Speakers
avatar for Bas Vodde

Bas Vodde

Odd-e
Bas Vodde is a coach, programmer, trainer, and author related to modern agile and lean product development. He is the creator of the LeSS (Large-Scale Scrum) framework for scaling agile development. He coaches organizations on three levels: organizational,  team,  individual... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
I3

2:00pm

Acceptance Criteria for Data-Focused User Stories (Lynn Winterboer)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Learn how to write acceptance criteria for DW/BI user stories that align your team to deliver valuable results to your project stakeholders.
Writing user stories for business intelligence projects already feels to many product owners like pushing a large rock up a big hill ... and needing to add solid acceptance criteria to each story feels a bit like the big hill had a false summit: Once you get to the top (user story written) you discover there's a small flat spot and then the hill continues up further, requiring additional detail in the form of acceptance criteria. As one BI PO recently put it, "I write the user story and feel like I've made excellent progress; then the team is all over me with 'That's great, but what's the acceptance criteria?', forcing me to yet again go deep. If I had a better understanding of "sufficient" acceptance criteria, I would have shared it with my team and stopped the beatings!"

Learning Outcomes:
  • How does acceptance criteria differ from the team's definition of "done"?
  • How detailed should acceptance criteria be?
  • What is included in acceptance criteria?
  • What is an example of acceptance criteria for a BI user story?

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Lynn Winterboer

Lynn Winterboer

Agile Analytics Educator & Coach, Winterboer Agile Analytics
I teach and coach Analytics and Business Intelligence teams on how to effectively apply agile principles and practices to their work. I also enjoy practicing what I teach by participating as an active agile team member for clients. My career has focused on Agile and data/BI, serving... Read More →



Tuesday August 8, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Wekiwa 6

2:00pm

UX in Agile: Introducing UX process into your Agile (Dave Watts, Bassel Kateeb)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Introducing User Experience (UX) into your agile development lifecycle does not have to be a zero-sum game. User experience strategies, approaches and methods do complement the agile methodology. Being able to apply these strategies across throughout the project lifecycle will invariably lead to better, more effective products for end users.
This session will help connect the dots between User Experience and agile principles through real world practical examples. We will focus on key UX strategies like who can get involved in user research and when, how to apply human centered design to the process, and rapidly prototyping ideas in order to validate key decisions with users and stakeholders. The session will not be a one size fits all approach to injecting UX into your agile teams, but focus on ways to help inform your design which will inevitably evolve over multiple sprint cycles.
This session targets project teams that are interested in including UX design principles into their agile projects. From initial user research through the prototyping and measuring of the outcomes.

Learning Outcomes:
  • • Introduce how UX fits within their current agile product development lifecycle
  • • Gain a better understanding of how to apply the key aspects of human centered design as it applies within the agile process (i.e. if you are always iterating and discovering, how do you actually deliver a product)
  • • Share examples of how iterative prototypes and subsequent feedback loops improve the overall product user experience
  • • Better understanding that UX is the responsibility of everyone on the team
  • • Understanding some of the challenges of working UX into an agile approach and ways around them
  • • Highlight the differences and benefits of agile and UX vs lean UX



Tuesday August 8, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
F4

3:45pm

Avoiding the Pitfalls of Capitalizing Software in an Agile World (Paul Argiry)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
With the increased speed that CIOs and CTOs are moving their teams into agile environments, their financial brethren are running to catch up. Having been grounded in the days of waterfall methodologies, the financial side of the house is dealing with great uncertainty on how to account for software development costs. Questions include: Are all development costs now expensed because of the continual planning, developing and pivoting of software projects that occurs within agile? If development costs can be capitalized, what is the appropriate way to track these costs – through hours or something new altogether like story points?
We will explore how the historic accounting guidance that was developed specifically through the lens of waterfall methodologies remains applicable within agile methodologies. We will look at the alternative ways to amortize these capitalized development costs and evaluate the pros and cons of doing so. In addition to the financial reporting aspects of this presentation, we will also explore the benefits gained by moving from project-based funding to overall product–based funding and what key requirements must be in place to have that successful.
The goal of this presentation is to increase awareness among the audience that while making the decision to become agile is a business decision, this decision cannot be done in isolation. The business will eventually need the approval by their finance colleagues and if these financially grounded colleagues are not educated on the financial and accounting implications of moving to agile methodologies they may block such a move based on their misunderstandings alone. Getting everyone on the same page is a key success factor when moving to agile.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand how cloud computing is impacting businesses and why agility is an important factor in that transformation.
  • Gain an appreciation that Finance colleagues must be included in decisions that involve changing from waterfall to agile environments and what requirements are needed to maintaining capitalization of software development costs, both for internal use or technology/software companies.
  • Learn the pros and cons of tracking costs using time tracking systems or story points.
  • Obtain an overview of the amortization of capitalized software costs within agile environments.
  • Understand the benefits of moving from individual funded projects to product based funding.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Paul Argiry

Paul Argiry

CFO, LeadingAgile
Paul Argiry is LeadingAgile’s CFO and brings 25 years of diverse financial and accounting experience to the organization. Paul assists LeadingAgile clients in understanding the financial benefits that a large-scale transformation brings to their business. Quantifying the financial... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Wekiwa 7&8

3:45pm

Agile Transformations Explained (Mike Cottmeyer)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Leading a large-scale agile transformation isn’t about adopting a new set of attitudes, processes, and behaviors at the team level… it’s about helping your company deliver faster to market, and developing the ability to respond to a rapidly-changing competitive landscape. First and foremost t’s about achieving business agility. Business agility comes from people having clarity of purpose, a willingness to be held accountable, and the ability to achieve measurable outcomes. Unfortunately, almost everything in modern organizations gets in the way of teams acting with any sort of autonomy. In most companies, achieving business agility requires significant organizational change.
Agile transformation necessitates a fundamental rethinking of how your company organizes for delivery, how it delivers value to it's customers, and how it plans and measures outcomes. Agile transformation is about building enabling structures, aligning the flow of work, and measuring for outcomes based progress. It's about breaking dependencies. The reality is that this kind of change can only be led from the top. This talk will explore how executives can define an idealized end-state for the transformation, build a fiscally responsible iterative and incremental plan to realize that end-state, as well as techniques for tracking progress and managing change.

Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A


Speakers
avatar for Mike Cottmeyer

Mike Cottmeyer

CEO and Founder, LeadingAgile


Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Wekiwa 3&4

3:45pm

Not Technical? Not a Problem! Introducing Engineering Practices Without Being Hands-On (Allison Pollard, Pradeepa Narayanaswamy)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
How do you coach teams in software craftsmanship practices when you are "Not Technical"? We assume our teams are addressing and improving their technical practices on an ongoing basis... and we all know what happens with assumptions!!! If the teams are not paying attention to their technical practices, the codebase is going to be a mess so big and so deep and so tall, you can not clean it up. Life will be BAD! How do you keep an agile team from losing productivity and not hyper-productively making a mess? Teams may not know where to get started adopting practices, but what can you do about it when you're "Not Technical"??
In this workshop, Allison and Pradeepa will create a knowledge sharing and learning environment where attendees will play a series of games to have an increased awareness of technical practices. Attendees will have a deeper understanding of technical practices and feel more comfortable introducing them in their organizations. Allison and Pradeepa will also introduce a bunch of tips and techniques for leveraging the technical expertise inside or outside the organization.
This session will help non-technical Scrum Masters, Agile Coaches, and other leaders feel more confident introducing technical practices to their teams and leadership. Attendees will take away strategies to support their organization in enhancing their technical practices.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify technical practices that support software development.
  • Introduce or leverage technical expertise inside or outside the organization.
  • Play a bunch of games to understand some technical practices.
  • Take these games and apply them in their organization.
  • Increase awareness and ability to participate and be around some technical discussions.

Attachments:

Speakers
PN

Pradeepa Narayanaswamy

Agile and Life Coach, Possibilities- Lives Transformed LLC
As an Agile Coach, I am a self-proclaimed “Agile Passionista” who strongly believes in agile values & principles to help organizations delight their customers. I help teams and leaders understanding & aligning with their organizational vision and support in their transformation... Read More →
avatar for Allison Pollard

Allison Pollard

Agile Coach, Improving
Allison Pollard helps people discover their Agile instincts and develop their coaching abilities. As an Agile coach with Improving in Dallas, Allison enjoys mentoring others to become great Scrum Masters and fostering communities that provide sustainability for Agile transformations... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Wekiwa 9&10

3:45pm

DevOps the mass extinction of manual processes (Bill Roberts, James La Spada)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
This is the story of how Capital One used DevOps Culture and Kanban Principles to significantly increase the speed of feature delivery, while lowering risk. Large organizations can be filled with manual processes, and many people feel there is nothing they can do about them. Our team took the name “Meteor” inspired by the one that took out the dinosaurs, because we wanted to cause the mass extinction of these manual processes.
In this presentation, we will discuss the ‘old’ manual way that work was completed at Capital One and the inefficiencies that we saw as a result. We will discuss the transformation to the DevOps culture that we helped to push. With the elimination of component teams and proper application of Kanban principles, we have taught teams how to manage their own adoption of DevOps in an effort to move the organization to full continuous integration and continuous delivery.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Define "self-service DevOps culture" and show methods for implementing within large organizations.
  • Illustrate the core principles needed to coach development teams to embrace DevOps.
  • Create an effective pipeline to deliver features into production multiple times a day with zero downtime.
  • Use effective branching strategy for CICD.
  • Show the benefits of using component testing with Github Pull Request checks for code quality.
  • Understand how to use kanban methodologies to manage both the flow of work and team dependencies.
  • Understand the benefits of feature teams vs. component teams.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Bill Roberts

Bill Roberts

Sr. Manager, Scrum Master, Capital One
Bill Roberts had his first experiences in technology as the manager of financial planning and analysis for IT organizations at Bank One, ING DIRECT USA, and Capital One. In 2013 he transitioned to IT as backlog owner for five middleware teams developing APIs. He received his Master's... Read More →
avatar for James La Spada

James La Spada

Master Software Engineer, Capital One
James La Spada has been a technology professional for a little over 10 years. He received his B.S. in Information Sciences and Technology from Penn State University and started his career in application development before graduation. Since then he has been very passionate with learning... Read More →



Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
F4

3:45pm

Agile UX with Lego (Samantha Laing, Angie Doyle)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Are you struggling to integrate User Experience techniques with your agile teams? Are any of these patterns familiar?
The UX team works one sprint ahead of the development team.
UX designers spend lots of energy on high fidelity mock-ups which the developers then ignore.
You produce working software each sprint, but recruiting users is time consuming so you only test with users before you release.
There is no time to incorporate changes from user feedback into the sprints before release.
The UX designers and the developers seem to speak a different language.
Developers get annoyed because the UX design work great on iOS, but clashes with Android standards.
If so join us for a fun interactive session where we use Lego to explore how you can overcome challenges like this in your own environment. You’ll work as a team doing both UX design, and development (with Lego), and see how and why these patterns happen, as well as what you can do about them.
This workshop is ideal for people from both the UX world, struggling to understand how to work with developers, and for developers struggling to understand what UX designers are trying to achieve.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the difference between traditional UX, agile UX and lean UX.
  • Recognize some of the common patterns that occur when teams integrate agile and UX
  • Experience why UX designers and developers often end up in these patterns
  • Learn how your entire team can be involved in UX
  • Learn simple techniques that will immediately improve the way you handle user feedback
  • Know the importance of UX and development skills being in the same cross functional team

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Angie Doyle

Angie Doyle

Agile Coach and Trainer, IQbusiness
Prior to becoming a consultant, I worked in the business process outsourcing industry where I pursued ways to make businesses more effective, more efficient and more capable of adapting to an ever-changing environment. So when I was introduced to Agile a few years later, it was a... Read More →
avatar for Samantha Laing

Samantha Laing

Agile Coach, Nomad8
My personal motto is ‘be brave’, and I embody this by taking on challenges one small step at a time.Most of my career has been in the IT industry, specifically Software Development. Nowadays I find myself coaching others with a passion for agile and a focus on self-care.I love... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Wekiwa 6

5:30pm

Agile Tonight! (Paul Hammond)

Abstract:
Ready for what’s next in Agile? Join us for Agile Tonight! — a lively hour of analysis and discussion about the state of Agility today and what the future may hold.
Moderated by Agile Alliance Chair Paul Hammond, the fun and intriguing talk-show format will bring together a number of experts to share views on industry and tech trends. We’ll also explore cutting edge ideas about large-scale culture and people change, and delve into issues and trends influencing our futures.

Learning Outcomes:
  • *


Speakers
avatar for Paul Hammond

Paul Hammond

Director of Development, eBay


Tuesday August 8, 2017 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Panzacola F1&F2
 
Wednesday, August 9
 

9:00am

Continuous Delivery in Agile (Jez Humble)

Abstract:
Since the Continuous Delivery book came out in 2010, it’s gone from being a controversial idea to a commonplace… until you consider that many people who say they are doing it aren’t really, and there are still plenty of places that consider it crazy talk. In this session Jez will present some of the highlights and lowlights of the past six years listening to people explain why continuous delivery won’t work, and what he learned in the process.

Learning Outcomes:
  • *

Attachments:

Speakers

Wednesday August 9, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
Gatlin ABC

10:45am

Catalytic Leadership (Paul Boos)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Losing good people during your transformation? Getting more resistance than you expected? You may be producing unwanted reactions in the way you are leading your people through change.
If you want your Agile transformation firing on all cylinders without the harmful side-effects, managers at all levels should focus on becoming Catalysts. Much like a chemical catalyst, your job is to help boost organizational performance by creating a healthy environment and providing the needed support. We’ll explore how you can do that through– –
  • Inviting people to co-create an aspirational goal – Telling stories to aid people through the transition – Using some simple guides that can help create safety during change
Along the way, we’ll touch upon organizational culture and how this affects your approach.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand leadership actions (catalysts) that can be taken to improve the environment, support others, and increase trust
  • Understand the concepts for leading change

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Paul Boos

Paul Boos

IT Executive Coach, Excella
Paul is an IT Executive Coach with Excella Consulting helping managers and teams improve their game. He focuses on pragmatic ways Agile, Lean, and leadership techniques can be applied to create more effective organizations. Paul has led small teams to large groups as a Federal, commercial... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Wekiwa 9&10

10:45am

The ROI of Learning Hour (Llewellyn Falco)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
What the value in going to this conference?
You're here, you took time off work and paid real money to be here. it safe to assume you see value in learning, but have you done the math?
The math turns out to be quite surprising, because it deals with systems involving compound interest.
Compound interest allows small changes to have massive effects over time.
Example 1:
Tim has a $100,000 loan at 100% interest. He pays $8,333 a month. At this rate it will take 50 years to pay off.
Allen has the same loan, but wants to pay it off 10 times faster. How much more a month does he have to pay to achieve this?
Normal math would say 10 times is 8,333 X 10.
But the actual answer is just a mere seventy dollars more each month to bring the time down a factor of 10 times.
Surprizing? Yeah!
So come hear a combination of personal experiences and mathematical visualization explaining just how much you are getting out of doing a bit of learning everyday.
Example 2
Team A works 8 hours a day.
Team B works 7 hours a day and spends 1 hour a day learning. This learning improves the team's output by 1%. How many days will it be until Team B has produced as much as Team A?


Learning Outcomes:
  • How to justify the ROI spent on learning
  • Why 10X is possible
  • What 10X looks like
  • How cognitive bias effect learning
  • Differences between self learning and group learning

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Llewellyn Falco

Llewellyn Falco

Agile Coach, Spun Labs
Llewellyn Falco is an Agile Technical Coach specializing in Legacy Code and Test Driven Development. He is the creator of the open source testing tool ApprovalTests( www.approvaltests.com ), co-founder of TeachingKidsProgram ( www.teachingkidsprogramming.org ) and a PluralSight a... Read More →



Wednesday August 9, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
F4

10:45am

Finding the First Slice (Richard Lawrence)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Many Agile practitioners are comfortable working iteratively in small slices once there's a basic foundation, but they struggle with where to start on a new project, product, or other big idea. What if Iteration 0 didn't need to exist? What if you could work iteratively from the beginning?
Agile For All clients have been able to successfully find small first slices for all kinds of software products, for combined software and hardware systems, and even beyond software in such areas as park construction and office remodeling. In many cases, projects with apparently significant up-front infrastructure requirements were able to ship a valuable slice to customers after just one or two sprints. Participants in this session will learn how to use Richard's Feature Mining technique to find early slices of any big idea that provide value, learning, and risk-mitigation.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Use Feature Mining to find an early slice of a big idea to get quick value, learning, and/or risk mitigation
  • Understand how to bring Feature Mining back to your team
  • Explain how different roles (PO, UX, developers, testers, etc.) are critical to effective slicing and how each contributes in Feature Mining

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Richard Lawrence

Richard Lawrence

Trainer & Coach, Agile For All
Co-owner of Agile For All, Richard Lawrence trains and coaches teams and organizations to become happier and more productive. From his diverse background in software development, engineering, anthropology, and political science, he helps people think more deeply about humanizing workplaces... Read More →



Wednesday August 9, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
F3

11:30am

Do We Still Need Business Analysts and Systems Engineers? Now More Than Ever! (Amy Silberbauer)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
The Internet of Things is profoundly changing the way products are monetized in a continuously competitive product and software delivery landscape. Traditionally, Business Analysts and Systems Engineers have been the critical roles that drive the identification and definition of new offerings, taking competitive pressures and segmentation into account -- but this is rapidly changing. Some would argue that operating as a lean startup and being agile implies that these roles are "old school", that we don't need them anymore. Not so fast! These are, in fact, the roles of the future but only if are expanded, crossing over into the business realm to become business-engineering resources that understand not only technical requirements and end user stories but also going beyond that circle of influence to embrace the views and ideas of all stakeholders in the organization. Planning and execution of real value requires an outside-in view of the business with a very strong focus on “customer-first”. While this is a major transformation, it is also a great opportunity for Business Analysts and Systems Engineers to have a much stronger impact and drive the convergence of Lean, Agile and Design Thinking principles into their own projects. Amy and Moshe explain the future of these roles, the value of outside-in thinking to articulate and define solutions and how the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) can help.

Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Delivery of value is not just about engineering anymore, it requires knowledge and collaboration across business and IT
  • 2. Enterprise scaled agile specifically addresses the transformation of Business Analysts and Systems Engineers as “change agents” defining new solutions and innovations
  • 3. Outside-in “design thinking” is a key element of successful product and software delivery of the future

Attachments:

Speakers
AS

Amy Silberbauer

Solution Architect, IBM, Watson IoT
I have been a software engineer with IBM for 30 years, this July. I started in developed working on tooling to catalog mainframe software and subsystem artifacts. In the middle of my career I was a development engineer and manager working on mainframe and cross-platform tooling. I... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Wekiwa 3&4

2:00pm

Think Before You Hack: Agile as Fieldwork (Elinor Slomba)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Can an organization's culture really be designed, engineered or installed? Why is it so persistent....and tricky? And where can a professional change agent turn when casual or superficial notions of what it means to "culture hack" do not seem to be doing justice to the technical excellence required by Agile principles?
This talk will draw upon the discipline of Cultural Anthropology to provide a few concrete examples of how experts talk about and study culture. Methods of fieldwork - living inside a culture other than one's own in order to observe it up close and describe it firsthand - will be broken down into an easy-to-use format designed to help you in your Agile practice.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Grasp that harm can come from cultural interventions based on change without understanding
  • Prepare to take on the role of Participant Observer in studying a workplace
  • Practice a few key field methods that reveal how a particular culture structures its own reality


Speakers
avatar for Elinor Slomba

Elinor Slomba

Founder, Arts Interstices
Writing, producing and facilitating at the crossroads of arts, business and agility - brokering new models for inspiring communities across sectors.


Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Wekiwa 9&10

3:45pm

Brainwriting: The Team Hack To Generating Better Ideas (Chris Murman)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
If you work in an office, your boss has probably forced you into a brainstorming session or two (or 12). Invented in the 1940s by an advertising executive, the purpose was to solicit a large number of ideas in a short period of time. By putting a collective of creative people in the same room, better concepts should come. Sounds very agile.
However, science has shown several times that brainstorming is a terrible technique. It’s cumbersome due to all of the interdependent activities happening at once. When spending time generating ideas as a group, you often spend more time thinking of others ideas than your own.
Fortunately, a relatively unknown technique is starting to gain popularity called brainwriting. Simply put, brainwriting involves a group generating ideas alone and passing them around the group in short bursts. It's a combination of group and individual interactions. Incorporating it into your team events can produce more diverse ideas and provide a friendlier environment for collaboration. In this session, I will review my experience with them in the past year and leave the audience with some tools to bring brainwriting back to their offices.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Chief amongst this study were the following keys to my experience with this technique:
  • - The fallacy of brainstorming: appealing to the head and the heart of the matter.
  • - Why the right environment matters for generating ideas.
  • - What exactly makes an idea diverse?
  • - A comparison of individual idea generation vs. group idea generation.
  • - A walkthrough of I used brainwriting in some of my team events.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Chris Murman

Chris Murman

Senior Agile Consultant, Solutions IQ
Chris Murman's first job out of college was the weekend sports anchor at an NBC affiliate. If he had only known what was in store!Interestingly enough, he still loves telling the stories of others every day. Each interaction is an opportunity to learn what made you unique, and understand... Read More →



Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Wekiwa 1&2

3:45pm

Agile’s Future? Skepticism. (Tomas Kejzlar, Fred Williams)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
There’s some weird stuff going on in the name of “agile” nowadays. Too many pretty promises, eager exaggerations, and misguided misapplications of misunderstood premises make for troubling times. So what is the future of agile? We want to share with you how agile fails and how agile succeeds. The key to the future of agile is being thoughtful, realistic, and above all skeptical.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - Agile is a mindset & way of work. Not a set of tools and processes.
  • - Agile is not suitable for every situation. Beware of false premises and false promises.
  • - Agile is flexible, which also means capable of distortion. Therefore, there is no unified solution for everybody—we need to use our brains.
  • - No change can be pushed from the top down without explanation or succeed only on the basis of logical reasons that "worked somewhere else".
  • - Small steps and a custom approach tailored to the context (organization, people, ...) is the key to successful agile adooption.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Tomas Kejzlar

Tomas Kejzlar

Agile Coach
Tomas has more than 10 years of experience as a software developer, team leader, senior manager and a agile coach in the banking and pharmaceutical sectors in Prague, Czech Republic. Tomas also lectures agile approaches and organizational change at Czech Technical University.


Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Wekiwa 3&4

3:45pm

Excel at Change: The Hidden Differentiator (Jeff Nielsen)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
In his original Extreme Programming book, Kent Beck said that we should “embrace change.” A few years later, the agile manifesto told us to “value responding to change over following a plan” and to “harness change for the customer's competitive advantage.” But what does this really mean? What does it look like in practice?
In my work with agile teams over the last 15 years, I've found that few of them are truly skilled at handling change. While they may give lip service to the idea, change more often than not brings frustration, delays, and quality problems. But excelling at change is a skill that can be learned. And the mastery of this skill is what differentiates teams that fully realize the benefits of an agile approach from those who don't.
In this talk, I’ll explore what it means to “excel at change”—both technically and culturally—and discuss some specific ways that individuals, teams, and organizations can get better at it.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand why a "change focus" is a key part of the agile mindset
  • See how getting better at change helps us think differently about the future
  • Recognize the differences between teams/cultures that excel at change and those that don't
  • Feel inspired to work on those skills that will help you be better at change

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Nielsen

Jeff Nielsen

CTO, The Common Application
Jeff helps people and organizations improve in the way they work together to produce software. Jeff is the Chief Product & Technology Officer at The Common Application, directing development, operations, and support for the high-volume system that over 1/3 of U.S. high-school... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
H4

3:45pm

Develop Better Products by Understanding Jobs-to-be-Done (Ozlem Yuce)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Jobs to be Done (JTBD) is an interview technique and way of thinking for revealing deeper insights into why people choose a product or service. Using JTBD helps us to avoid building stuff that no-one wants. It is a way to better understand what a product or service really needs to do.

Why this matters
The first principle of the Agile Manifesto says: “Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software”. And yet, 15 years later, we still see a lot of organisations delivering software that generates very little or no value. The main reason is quite simple: it doesn’t satisfy customers, because it doesn't help them with their Job to be Done.
No team wants to build a product that no-one wants. Not only is this a waste of time and money, but it is a huge waste of precious human potential. How can we do better?

Stop fooling ourselves
Part of the problem is that we have so many cognitive bias that we have to fight against. We are prone to fooling ourselves into believing that we really do know what customers want – treating bold assumptions as facts.
As a result, we spend most of our time adding new features, iterating on our products and blindly following product roadmaps that actually get us nowhere at all.
JTBD helps us better understand what users and customers are trying to get done, as well as their purchase decisions. Armed with this information we are in a much better position to test different solutions that are more focused on what customers are more likely to actually use.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand why JTBD helps us reveal customers needs
  • Learn how to discover the Jobs that customers are trying to do
  • Practice how to interview customers to reveal their JTBD
  • Understand how to incorporate JTBD in your thinking about problems and solutions
  • Learn how to use JTBD as a lens for improving your product/service
  • Understand how JTBD is different to Personas and Empathy Maps
  • Understand how JTBD is different to Market Segmentation


Speakers
avatar for Ozlem Yuce

Ozlem Yuce

Chief Product Officer, Agile@Heart
Ozlem works with teams to quickly develop products and services that truly delight customers. With 15 years experience working in e-commerce, software and product development, she has worked with everything from Fortune 500 behemoths to fast-growing Inc 5000 startups. Ozlem has... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
F1

3:45pm

Transformational Innovation : How Agile Methods can Benefit from Systems Thinking (Kishau Rogers)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Transformational innovation requires a deep understanding of and commitment to addressing mental models which are often the cause of broken systems. This presentation will demonstrate how agile methods can benefit from a better understanding of the bigger picture. It has been stated that “more software projects have gone awry from management’s taking action based on incorrect system models than for all other causes combined.” Many development project failures are rarely technical and can often be attributed to unintended consequences due to a lack of understanding of people, policies, and other impacted systems.
This workshop will present useful techniques for achieving technical excellence by using technology as a tool, agile as the method and systems thinking principles as the foundation. We will cover three case studies which demonstrate how "mental models" have impacted technology projects in the areas of health, technology, and business. We will discuss how to integrate three systems thinking strategies into your service delivery operations: causal loop diagrams for aligning mental models, iceberg model for problem-solving and double loop learning for making transformational improvements.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Introduction to Systems Thinking
  • Casual Diagrams and Feedback Loops
  • Problem Solving with Iceberg Theory
  • Double Loop Learning

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Kishau Rogers

Kishau Rogers

CEO, Websmith Studio Inc.
Kishau Rogers is a serial tech entrepreneur and is the Founder of technology ventures such as Websmith Studio Inc., TimeStudy, PeerLoc. Kishau has over twenty years of industry experience, specializing in using computer science and systems thinking principles to influence how we... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
F4

3:45pm

How to create a learning culture that fosters growth to enable craftsmanship (Maarten Kossen)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
The growth of an organization is linked to the growth of the people within that organization. But how do you create a learning culture in an organization in which people can grow? How do you keep fostering and nurturing that growth? How do you enable craftsmanship?
In order to grow, (software) companies these days need a different kind of different kind of environment for their people to excel in. During this session I’d like to share lessons that will help you enable an environment of learning and growth in order to enable craftsmanship, with a focus on software development environments. Because for years and years the world has established software development as something comparable to making hamburgers at McDonald’s, rather than the creative craft is actually is. As with any craft, it requires craftsman. But how do people become craftsmen and how can you enable an environment in which they can?
We'll explore what the current situation is in many companies, why it needs to be changed and how we can change it. We'll explore how we can create a learning culture within organizations in which people can grow and we'll have a look at how to maintain that culture. Finally, we'll go over some tools and practices that may help with that, focused on software craftsmanship within an agile context.
As someone that has experienced the transition from “code monkey” to craftsman and someone that has seen (and still sees) companies every day that face this challenge, I’ll introduce a number of actual client stories that may help the audience find the answers they need. I’ll also ask for input from the audience on their experience with growth and craftsmanship.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding the importance of the growth of people within a company
  • Insights into how to create and/or enable a learning culture in which people can grow
  • Understanding creativity within an agile software development organization and its boundaries
  • Understanding the changing need from both a craftsman's as well as an organization's perspective
  • Practices that will help craftsman become better or will help "code monkeys" become craftsman
  • Your own insights shared at the end of the session and summarized in a blog post (written by the speaker)

Attachments:

Speakers

Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
H1

3:45pm

The Ultimate Agile Mix Tape (Tommy Norman)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
All the major Agile approaches (Scrum, XP, Lean, Kanban) have their own areas of focus and specific practices, but since they all have a common ground of values and principles there is plenty of opportunity to blend them to find the best process for your organization. Some practices may cause friction and even outright conflict with each other, but when you understand the underlying reasons behind them you can better determine which ones will suit your environment and company values. When you start with your end goal in mind and work backwards from there, you can go beyond comparing the practices of different approaches in an effort to find the perfect one and move to aligning to the strengths and areas of focus behind these practices. This session outlines the core strengths and focuses of the major Agile approaches and where the align nicely, somewhat fit together, and conflict. We will cover many real world scenarios of these types of hybrid implementations as well as how they succeeded and failed. Come prepared to share your own goals and stories!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify core strengths and practices or Scrum, XP, Lean, and Kanban,
  • Identify where these approaches align and where the conflict.
  • Identify patterns in your organization that align with different combinations of approaches.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Tommy Norman

Tommy Norman

Vice President of Agile Operations, Acklen Avenue
Tommy Norman is Vice President of Agile Operations for Acklen Avenue where he ensures they develop software based on the principles and practices of Agile. For the past 20 years he has been helping companies create valuable solutions as a CSM, CSP, CEC, PSM 1, SAFe Agilist, and 8... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
H3

3:45pm

Use Tables to Drive out Ambiguity/Redundancy, Discover Scenarios, and Solve World Hunger (Ken Pugh)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Ambiguous or missing requirements cause waste, slipped schedules, and mistrust with an organization. Implementing a set of misunderstood requirements produces developer and customer frustration. Creating acceptance tests prior to implementation helps create a common understanding between business and development.
Acceptance tests start with communication between the members of the triad- business, developer, and tester. In this session, we specifically examine how to use tables as an effective means of communication. Employing tables as an analysis matrix helps a team discover missing scenarios. Redundant tests increase test load, so we show how performing an analogy of Karnaugh mapping on tables can help reduce redundant scenarios. We demonstrate that examining tables from various aspects, such as column headers, can reduce ambiguity and help form a domain specific language (DSL). A consistent DSL decreases frustration in discussing future requirements.
We briefly show how to turn the tables into tests for Fit and Gherkin syntax.

Learning Outcomes:
  • • How to elicit details of a requirement using tabular format
  • • How to use tables to search for missing scenarios in acceptance tests
  • • How to discover ambiguity and redundancy in acceptance tests
  • • A way to logically connect tables to classes and modules
  • • How to break complicated requirements represented by tables into smaller ones

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ken Pugh

Ken Pugh

Chief Consultant, Ken Pugh, Inc.
Ken Pugh helps companies evolve into lean-agile organizations through training and coaching. His special interests are in collaborating on requirements, delivering business value, and using lean principles to deliver high quality quickly. Ken trains, mentors, and testifies on technology... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
F2

5:30pm

Agile Alliance Members Meeting (Paul Hammond)

Abstract:
The annual Agile Alliance Members’ Meeting will be held at the Agile2017 Conference. Members are invited to meet, hear about, and discuss Alliance business with the Agile Alliance Board of Directors. Drinks and snacks
will be served.

Learning Outcomes:
  • *


Speakers
avatar for Paul Hammond

Paul Hammond

Director of Development, eBay


Wednesday August 9, 2017 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Sebastian I1&I2
 
Thursday, August 10
 

9:00am

Don’t write that cheque! It’s time to ditch big upfront funding. (Linda Luu)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Organizations have typically adhered to an annual budgeting ceremony where funds are allocated across an organization to a variety of program and project areas. The purpose is to realize the organization’s strategy. Unfortunately, the success of this approach is mixed at best. Funding is decided upfront based on assumptions that are poorly understood. Once work is broken down there is little connection to the organizational value it’s supposed to deliver. There is little accountability for business results the further a team is away from executive leadership.
Value Driven Management (VDM) is a way of working that advocates embracing agile principles throughout the entire organization (including Finance, HR, PMO, Product, Program, Portfolio). This approach enables leaders to steer their strategic portfolio more deliberately to maximize value from investments and realize the outcomes earlier.
This talk will introduce Value Driven Management, cover case studies and practical examples, end with an interactive exercise on getting started with VDM in your organization, and leave the audience with lessons learned.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how to confront waterfall business practices and their limitation on your organization’s ability to scale agility
  • Build a lean / agile organization at scale focused on changing the way investments are allocated and value is measured
  • Gain buy-in from executive stakeholders, business collaborators and delivery team members to embrace this new paradigm

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Linda Luu

Linda Luu

Product & Portfolio, ThoughtWorks
Linda works at ThoughtWorks leading global organizations to create innovative new products and experiences using lean and agile practices. Linda is passionate about identifying systemic problems and applying a holistic approach to organizational change.



Thursday August 10, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
Wekiwa 5

9:00am

Moral Foundations Theory: to help address conflict (Linda Rising)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
It seems like the world is becoming more divided. People around the world are taking sides. This is nowhere more evident than in the United States where the last presidential election left the citizens asking serious questions about those on the "other side." You hear, for example, "What's wrong with those people? They don't seem to think logically. How can we have a conversation when they are so resistant to hearing other points of view. The truth is, we are all biased. The truth is, we filter all information. The truth is, we reach conclusions using our own version of logic and once we get there, we're really reluctant to change. This is a big problem and I don't even have the slightest hope of solving it, but I have discovered some interesting research that has helped me develop better ways of listening and communicating and I would like to share that in this workshop. The research is based on Moral Foundations Theory. I hope to provide enough of an overview so that participants can begin to practice it and leave with a new set of tools for overcoming conflict.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will learn the basics of Moral Foundations Theory and will have had a chance to apply the theory in a scenario with a small group.
  • In brief, the 5 foundations of morality are as follows:
  • (1) Harm/care. We have strong feelings about those who care for others or cause them harm. Liberals care more about this than conservatives.
  • (2) Fairness/reciprocity. Liberals care more about this than conservatives.
  • (3) In-group/loyalty. The foundation of cooperation. Conservatives care more about this than liberals.
  • (4) Authority/respect. Conservatives care more about this than liberals.
  • (5) Purity/sanctity. A lot of this is about what you're willing to touch, or put into your body. Conservatives care more about this than liberals.
  • When issues arise that are important to us we justify our stance by using the values that are most important to us. For liberals: (1) and (2) above, for conservatives: (3), (4), (5).
  • Experiments show that after receiving this information, both liberals and conservatives still argue their points by basing their reasoning on the values that they hold dear, when the research shows they would be more effective if they used the values that are most important to the other. This, of course, is true for any point of view. We're often told to put ourselves in the other person's shoes and to see the world as the other person sees it. The astounding thing about this particular research is that people are more convincing when they base their arguments on the other person's point of view but they refuse to do it. We obviously need practice. That's what this workshop will be all about. We will pair up and practice arguing from both sides. One argument will be easy but the other argument will be very, very difficult. Good for the brain.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Linda Rising

Linda Rising

Queen of Patterns, Linda Rising LLC
Linda Rising is an independent consultant based in Nashville, Tennessee. Linda has a Ph.D. from Arizona State University in the field of object-based design metrics and a background that includes university teaching and industry work in telecommunications, avionics, and tactical weapons... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
I1

9:00am

Everything Object-Oriented Design Taught Me About Leadership (Daniel Davis)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Most senior software developers eventually find themselves in a position of leadership. About two years ago, I was in the same boat, being asked to take over as tech lead for a large agile project. I felt unprepared, I didn't know the first thing about being in charge! I found myself falling back to the thing I had spent years learning: object-oriented design principles.
In this talk, I'll walk through some of the parallels between clean coding and leadership. I'll discuss some design anti-patterns with different styles of leadership and how to avoid falling into classic management traps. If you've always felt like your bosses treat you like a class with too many responsibilities, come learn how to code better leadership!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Several examples of design patterns that can be applied to team leadership
  • A refresher on some object-oriented design best practices
  • An understanding of classic management myths and why they don't apply to leading software teams
  • A couple of good book suggestions for learning more about leadership
  • Reassurance that they are capable of leading teams and it doesn't require fancy training

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Davis

Daniel Davis

Managing Consultant, Excella Consulting
I love testing, Agile and cats. If any of those things interest you, come find me. If any of those interests overlap (e.g. Agile cats), definitely come find me!



Thursday August 10, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
F4

9:00am

Agile BA Practices using The Guide to Business Analysis (Joy Beatty, David Bieg)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
As organizations and individuals transition to be more Agile, often they throw existing good business analysis practices out the door and start fresh. Its baffling to us that while one day good practices seem to be working well, the next day, the team is “Agile” and they stop doing all the things that worked before! Participants going through an Agile transformation will leave this workshop with ideas about how to avoid throwing the baby out with the bathwater in their own analysis practices. We’ll guide the workshop using lessons we’ve learned during the development of “The Guide to Business Analysis” which “Includes the Standard for Business Analysis” that will be published by PMI in 2017!
For background, we will briefly share the writing process for the business analysis guide and standard so that we can then apply the same ideas during the workshop activities. The background information will include our Agile approach to the writing, how we ensured Agile was not an afterthought, and some of the constructs we used to handle tailoring business analysis to a variety of life cycles.
The workshop activities will use a friendly, collaborative, and iterative game to identify ways to make existing business analysis practices, processes, techniques, and tools Agile-friendly. We hope you refer to the guide yourself, but if not we think the workshop will help you transition your own organizations and own practices to be more Agile….without throwing all your existing good practices out the door.

Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. A creative approach to thinking about how to transform existing processes for Agile, rather than starting from scratch
  • 2. Common challenges in transforming business analysis to Agile approaches, including vocabulary and role variances
  • 3. Examples of how common business analysis practices, processes, tools, and techniques can be transformed to work in Agile approaches
  • 4. A view into PMI’s “The Guide to Business Analysis” and how it can help your organization be successful with Agile

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for David Bieg

David Bieg

Business Analysis Program Manager, PMI
Dave has 34 years of experience in business including owning two of his own businesses. Dave would love to discuss how he's been contributing to Business Analysis and Agile at PMI. Dave’s corporate experience includes General Electric, Lockheed Martin and Booz Allen, where he served... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
H3

9:00am

How ATDD Fixed Your Agile Flow (John Riley)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Customers demand quality products. Automated regression testing is a method to deliver a quality product. However, several considerations need to be made before committing to implementing automated testing. For example, will automation introduce unnecessary work in the development process? Will team headcount need to be increased? How much will the tools cost? What additional value, if any, was gained in the end?
This presentation will demonstrate how the test-first mindset of the ATDD (Acceptance Test Driven Development) process naturally opens the doors for automated testing. We will see how ATDD can actually simplify the development process and allow teams to continuously improve to become truly agile. A demonstration of an automated regression test suite in action will illustrate just one of many added benefits to products implemented using ATDD.

Learning Outcomes:
  • * Learn how simplifying development processes can produce quick value
  • * Develop a common language that developers, testers, and Product Owners can all understand
  • * Demonstrate other advantages that early user acceptance testing can continually produce value
  • * How to choose the correct test automation tools to implement your automated regression test suite
  • * How the refined process benefits the team
  • * How the organization benefits from the value of a test-first mindset

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for John Riley

John Riley

Principal Agile Coach and Trainer, Ready Set Agile, LLC
John is the Principal Agile Coach and Trainer at Ready Set Agile in Columbus, OH. He holds certifications for all scrum roles, and his career has also focused on applying techniques in Lean Manufacturing and Application Lifecycle Management for process improvement as an Enterprise... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
F2

9:45am

Founding a Code Bootcamp with Agile (Harold Shinsato)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Montana Code School (MTCS) is a community project that has deliberately used philosophy, ideas, practices, and patterns from the Agile community to teach new programmers to code since it was founded in 2015. This experience report tells its story, of how the local business and entrepreneurial community requested it during an agile meeting process, and how volunteers and non-profits got it launched with support from the University of Montana. MTCS teaches new programmers mostly through immersion in group projects with frequent community interaction that includes visits and presentations from the developers and business leaders in the community, and demonstrations of student project offered to the public. Scrum, TDD, and Mob Programming are some of the most powerful of the agile practices used in classes, though there are many more. As of Spring 2017 MTCS has completed 6 cohorts in two locations and in Montana with three more in progress (both full time and part time). This report will share some of the challenges and benefits in adopting agile techniques, and offer some insights for general education and how this teaching effort helped evolve the author's understanding of agile coaching and enhanced the power and impact of his own consulting practice.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • N/A

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Harold Shinsato

Harold Shinsato

Agile Coach/Dev
Open Space Technology, OpenSpace Agility, Coaching, The Core Protocols, Lean Coffee, Test Driven/Behavior Driven Development, Continuous Integration/Jenkins.


Thursday August 10, 2017 9:45am - 10:15am
Wekiwa 1&2

10:45am

Partnering to Improve Usability (Krystina Edwards)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Our software team at IHS Markit set out to improve the usability of our engineering applications with the assistance of an in house interaction design group. Initially, we were skeptical of their lengthy design cycles and worried it would clash with our iterative development process. We experimented with developing our own fast prototypes while waiting on the design team and we were convinced we could proceed without their expertise.
Ultimately, we learned a humbling lesson: As subject matter experts we have an instinctive bias that we were injecting into our designs and influencing user test sessions. We realized the value of the design team’s expertise and that by partnering with others to design our software we can achieve better UX outcomes.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • N/A

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Krystina Edwards

Krystina Edwards

Product Owner, IHS Markit



Thursday August 10, 2017 10:45am - 11:15am
Wekiwa 1&2

10:45am

Naughty or Nice, Santa's spreading Agile Marketing Advice (Kim Brainard)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Santa delivers value, faster, and better than any business in the World! He’s a jolly old sole and one hell of a marketing genius. Branding Saint Nick positioned Santa Pays It Forward (SPIF), a non-profit, to cultivate a one elf shop, into a lean non-profit workshop spanning across 8 states, providing for low income seniors.
Join me in this real life fairytale,"Twas the night Santa Pays It Forward became an overnight non-profit success!" Discover how the Agile Marketing Manifesto helped brand this non-profit implementing marketing values and principles to fuel creation. Santa is possibly the world’s most beloved, but to truly market a company your mind and heart have to be in it. I will share the power of conviction and its impact to marketing. Finally, I will explain how taking a unique approach to selling proposition will set a company apart from the rest.
Now on Dasher, on Dancer, is your mindset Prancer? On Comet, On Cupid, it’s time to use Agile Marking to innovate your business.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how adaptive campaigns over big bang campaigns can be most cost effective for lean startups
  • Discover ways to empower and motivate individuals to build marketing programs by giving them the environment and support needed
  • Define innovative ideas to dress your brand for any season

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Kim Brainard

Kim Brainard

Co-CEO, Radtac U.S.
I LOVE people and enjoy creating positive change in their professional and personal lives. Coaching others to realize their potential and setting them up to achieve results is a win for everyone. Having the opportunity to train and teach others to learn is a gift and inspires me each... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
H1

10:45am

Sustainable Coaching - Maintain Your Passion (Julie Smith, Jessica Schroeder)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely, but what about you, the coach? How do you maintain your passion for coaching while trudging toward organizational change?
Coaching can be exhilarating, can connect us with others, and lead us to develop new talents. Coaching can also make us doubt our own ability, question our influence, and sometimes leave us wondering if we made the wrong career choice. Learn how to define success for yourself, get out of your own way, create focus, preserve your energy and refuel. This session is designed for newer coaches, but will prove valuable to any coach or change agent facing frustration or burnout.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn to define what success means to you and know which parts you can control
  • Better understand the impediments standing in your way of being an amazing coach
  • Exposure to an activity that connects your actions with your goals
  • How to preserve your energy and refuel

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Julie Smith

Julie Smith

Agile Leader, Worldwide Technology
I am an agile leader passionate about helping people, teams, and organizations realize their worth and power. I am amazed by the power of ideation frameworks that bring people together to solve complex problems. My day day consists largely of coaching agile coaches and leaders... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Wekiwa 7&8

10:45am

It's Not Just About Culture: Co-creating an Awesome Agile Climate in an Imperfect World (Laura Powers)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
The winds of Agile change are blowing – occasionally a tornado bringing dramatic, sometimes unexpected change, and other times a gentle breeze that changes little. Have you ever noticed that despite whatever may be happening in the greater organization, some teams thrive - getting work done and seemingly enjoying their journey together while other teams struggle to weather the storm?
Same organization. Same culture. What's going on? In a nutshell, an organization's "culture" is its personality, while a team's "climate" is its mood. While culture takes time to shift, studies by the Hay Group indicate that 70% of employees' experience at work is determined by their team and immediate leadership - the team climate. A team’s climate profoundly impacts engagement, collaboration and results. AND it is something a team can co-create for itself – irrespective of the organization’s culture.
In this interactive session, we will explore the factors that contribute to a team's climate, how team members can proactively influence it and the role that we can play in fostering an awesome Agile team climate, no matter what storms may be brewing beyond the team.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Distinguish the difference between an organization's culture and a team's climate
  • Explain the importance of co-creating a positive, supportive climate within an agile team
  • List at least 3 key factors influencing a team's climate
  • Understand how to facilitate a "climate" design session with your team
  • Choose and commit to an action beyond Agile2017 to bring these climate learnings and experiences back to your "real world" ecosystem.

Attachments:

Speakers

Thursday August 10, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
I3

10:45am

Lightning Talks

Abstract:
The purpose of the Lightning Talk Track is to provide a lightweight, flexible opportunity for speakers to share valuable information with participants. Presentations are short with one of the following formats:
3 minute Lightning Talk (no slides)
5 minute Lightning Talk (slides)
7 minute Pecha Kucha style presentation
The themes of lightning talks will follow the themes of the conference. e.g. People, Process at Scale, and Technology. Each session will contain approximately 10 presentations around one of these theme areas. This provides an opportunity for rapid and diverse learning on a variety of topics.
Currently Planned talks include:
  • Ewan O'Leary - Teaching Your Organization How to Use Coaches More Effectively
  • Chris Murman - Your Brain Wants You To Fail (And Other Reasons Why Change Is Hard)
  • Logan Daigle - The Farmer, His Tractor, and Olive Garden - A DevOps Story
  • Meg Ward - Everything I know about Agile Management I learned from Roller Derby
  • Ravi Tadwalkar - GetKanban Preamble: How did TPS House influence me to become better coach and teammate?
  • Saya Sone - Overworked and Overwhelmed- What Can You Do About it? 
  • Joanna Vahlsing - Gender's Impact on the Ability for Agile Teams to have Meaningful Feedback Loops
  • Beth Hatter - "Who am I now? - Exploring Myths and Realities of Managers Working with Agile Teams
  • Thomas Perry - Slowing Down

Thursday August 10, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Wekiwa 3&4

10:45am

Drive Executive Alignment on Agile Priorities at Scale (Stephanie Allen, Chris Coffman)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
In 2009, Don Reinertsen suggested that prioritizing product development based on profitability projections (e.g. ROI) alone is a mistake, yet so many organizations continue to do that now. Perhaps that is because driving stakeholders to agree on the prioritization of development work is difficult under the best of circumstances; add in the support of competing verticals, acquisitions, and a rapidly changing marketplace and alignment can feel almost impossible.
That is the situation that we faced at Rosetta Stone. Thankfully, there is a framework designed to help teams weigh a variety of objective inputs to make effective decisions about the relative priority of work: Weighted Shortest Job First (WSJF).
In this workshop, we will role-play the use of WSJF to gain consensus on the priority of potential development work. After a quick overview, participants will practice collecting inputs from stakeholders and using the weighted shortest job first formulas. Finally, we will present a case study for how we implemented this methodology at Rosetta Stone, with tips for overcoming potential obstacles. This session is great for product owners, managers, scrum masters, dev leads, and anyone trying to balance a complex set of priorities in a resource constrained environment.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the inputs of Weighted Shortest Job First and how to solicit them from stakeholders
  • Use the Weighted Shortest Job First formula to determine the priority of epics and features
  • Identify and overcome obstacles to successful use of the Weighted Shortest Job First method

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Allen

Stephanie Allen

Vice President, Digital Product Management, Pearson
I specialize in the design and development of educational technology products, leading the creation of innovative new programs that incorporate the latest industry advances in order to exceed expectations for learner goal achievement. Talk to me about product management and educational... Read More →
avatar for Chris Coffman

Chris Coffman

Senior Director, Product, Rosetta Stone
I lead the Product Management and Project Management teams at Rosetta Stone. Rosetta Stone’s learning solutions are used by schools, businesses, government organizations and millions of individuals around the world. I'm passionate about helping our customers improve their lives... Read More →



Thursday August 10, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
H4

10:45am

API Testing FUNdamentals (JoEllen Carter, Dan Gilkerson)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Applications increasingly talk to each other behind the scenes via APIs. Google’s recent acquisition of Apigee, an API management company, is a strong indicator of the continued importance of APIs in software development. APIs are like building blocks, providing services and data that can be connected with other APIs to build powerful customized apps. However, testing an API can be challenging for these reasons:
  • There is no built-in interface
  • Breaking changes can cause widespread outages
  • Sensitive data may be exposed or accessed
  • Accepted testing paradigms can be difficult to adapt to APIs
In this workshop, you will learn how to fearlessly approach testing an API even if you've never heard of HTTP or cURL. In particular, you will learn:
  • Current business trends that are driving API development
  • Components of HTTP requests and responses, including authentication models, and how to inspect HTTP traffic
  • How to ‘explore’ an API and get some hands-on practice using popular tools
  • Tips on how to design tests for security, performance and backwards-compatibility risks
  • How to incorporate juggling, magic, and standup comedy into your tests (courtesy of Dan)

Learning Outcomes:
  • APIs and application architecture - Why APIs are important
  • HTTP basic info
  • How to turn an HTTP request and response into a 'test'
  • Exploratory testing heuristics particularly valuable when testing an API
  • Recommended tests for any API

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for JoEllen Carter

JoEllen Carter

QA Manager, Olo, Inc.
I work at Olo! At Olo, we develop an online food ordering platform used by many of the country’s largest restaurant chains, reaching millions of consumers. Our highly skilled team of testers supports weekly releases and a constantly changing architecture as we transition to a... Read More →



Thursday August 10, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Wekiwa 5

11:30am

How we grew Mob Programming, preserved culture, and maintained quality (Christopher Lucian)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
I am Chris Lucian, the Director of Software Development at Hunter Industries and this is our story of a small successful team growing from 5 to 30 people in just 1 year. We first had to develop the buy in for Mob Programming across the organization. As we grew we needed to ensure the preservation and guided growth of our culture. In need of a new facility we designed a great working environment. Interviews had to embody the spirit of Mob Programming while still evaluating our candidates in a fair way. Our technical excellence practices needed to continue to be a focus. Our department incorporated a flat department structure in order to distribute management tasks throughout the team. During the entire time we faced challenge after challenge which helped develop our processes in a way that is adaptable and yet facilitated our growth.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • N/A

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Lucian

Christopher Lucian

Director of Software Development, Hunter Industries
I'm Chris Lucian, the director of software development at hunter industries and a founder of mob programming. I am passionate about the advancement of machine learning and software craftsmanship. I seek the continuous improvement of myself, my family, my company, and my community... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Wekiwa 1&2

2:00pm

Mob Programming: a Live Action Role Playing Game (Willem Larsen)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
When done right, mob-programming can be thought of as the "bulldozer" of development practices - it is thorough and unstoppable. Clean maintainable code, massive team learning, and a breakdown of knowledge silos are a natural consequence of developing software in this way.
Of course, "when done right" is the catch. If your team mobs long enough you'll reinvent many of the successful roles and sub-practices that make mobbing soar. But why wait? "Mob Programming: the Role Playing Game" is a gamified mob programming experience where you will actively practice and integrate the behaviors and roles that make for successful mobbing, saving your team time and effort. Mob skills also apply to pairing, and the Mob is a great forum for improving paired development.
The game involves team coding, solving a code kata in real time with the support of everyone present.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will reflect on and improve how they use their tooling
  • Attendees will learn to sift for the best group idea to implement
  • Attendees will learn to communicate their ideas in both finely-detailed and high-abstraction ways
  • Attendees will learn to focus on how they can best contribute in any moment to the mob's mission, technically and interpersonally
  • Attendees will learn the basic successful structure of a mob and how to build on it


Speakers

Thursday August 10, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
F2

2:00pm

How to train your HiPPO (Joshua Arnold)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Have you noticed the impact when someone more senior in your organisation shares their opinion? Meet the HiPPO: the Highest Paid Person’s Opinion. Sometimes it’s subtle and unintended. Other times it’s more direct and intentional. Either way, the HiPPO is a dangerous animal in Product Management.
When we allow the HiPPO to drive decision-making we hide critical assumptions. Value and urgency is buried. MVP scope becomes massive. Roadmap dates become commitments. Options get prematurely closed down and the chances of discovering black swans is reduced. Indeed, the HiPPO is one of the most dangerous animals to let stomp around in Product Management.
Whilst the HiPPO likes to be in charge, none of us want to be responsible for developing products that nobody wants. How can we help the HiPPO to help themselves?
This workshop is a chance to learn and practice a few simple techniques for training the HiPPOs in your organisation.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand why the HiPPO is so dangerous in product development
  • Gain experience using 5 ways to help handle the HiPPO


Speakers
avatar for Joshua Arnold

Joshua Arnold

Engineer, blackswanfarming.com
With a background in fluid mechanics and systems engineering, Joshua has worked for the past decade with various organisations to improve their systems of innovation and delivery. In particular, Joshua has focused on the problem of prioritisation and portfolio management, helping... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Wekiwa 9&10

2:00pm

Technical Debt Is A Systemic Problem, Not A Personal Failing (Tom Grant)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
You often hear technical debt described as a personal failing. Why didn't you code with greater rigor? By creating technical debt, how could you have made life harder on people working in the code? More often than not, technical debt is the result of bigger, systemic problems.
Chances are, you're not a bad person. You didn't want this to happen. It's the system, not you, that's chiefly responsible.
In this talk, we will present some of the conclusions from the Agile Alliance's technical debt working group, which has looked into the systemic causes and consequences of technical debt. While marginal amounts of technical debt will always accrue, that does not explain why substantial technical debt is a widespread phenomenon. The organization in which software development teams work is the much bigger culprit. Many systemic causes, such as deadline pressures, under-investment in skills, and even the unwillingness to measure technical debt, conspire to create a growing burden on software professionals, who would otherwise choose not to create this problem if given the opportunity.
Just as technical debt has systemic causes, the real cost of technical debt lies at the system level. The increasing drag on software innovation has effects not just on individual and team productivity, but on the software value stream, the portfolio, and the organization as a whole. Sometimes, the cost is obvious, such as the valuation of a start-up company's code; other times, the consequences are far more subtle and insidious.
During this session, we will use the language and methods of systems theory to better come to grips with the causes and consequences of technical debt. Don't worry if systems thinking is unfamiliar — we will cover the basics during the talk. We will also do an exercise in which you will create a simple systems model of your own challenges with technical debt, and discuss how this model should help you shape a plan of action for dealing with technical debt.
Ultimately, the goal of this session is to give you the tools to better deal with technical debt. Rather than blaming individual developers, you will be able to show the systemic sources of technical debt, and assess the relative value of addressing each of them. Rather than depending on technical measures to convey the costs of technical debt, we will help you to put the costs of technical debt in stark business terms.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Common sources of technical debt
  • Important costs of technical debt
  • A common language for business and technical people to speak about technical debt
  • Hands-on experience using this language to describe the attendee's own challenges with technical debt


Speakers
avatar for Tom Grant

Tom Grant

Founder, GameChange LLC
Tom Grant helps software professionals innovate more successfully, using a combination of Agile and serious games. Tom consults with clients about their Agile and Lean transformation strategies, while using serious games to increase the odds that these transformation efforts will... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
I3

2:00pm

Lightning Talks

Abstract:
The purpose of the Lightning Talk Track is to provide a lightweight, flexible opportunity for speakers to share valuable information with participants. Presentations are short with one of the following formats:
3 minute Lightning Talk (no slides)
5 minute Lightning Talk (slides)
7 minute Pecha Kucha style presentation
The themes of lightning talks will follow the themes of the conference. e.g. People, Process at Scale, and Technology. Each session will contain approximately 10 presentations around one of these theme areas. This provides an opportunity for rapid and diverse learning on a variety of topics.
Currently Planned talks include:
  • Dhaval Panchal - Why Estimates make me frown :(
  • David Horowitz - Retrospectives: From Complaining to Actionable Learning
  • Rob Keefer - Embrace Your Complexity and No One Else's
  • Abhay Bhargav - Agile Threat Modeling in 7 minutes or less
  • Rene Bostic - How Agile Developers May Realize New Opportunities for Innovation with Blockchain 


Thursday August 10, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Wekiwa 3&4

3:45pm

Knowing what bad code looks like (Llewellyn Falco)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Be able to tell at a glance if your programmers are giving you bad quality code. Using the same cutting edge techniques researchers at university of Iowa are using to train pigeons to recognize cancer from MRI's, come learn to recognize cancer in your code base.
You don’t need to be a mechanic to know something is wrong with your car. And you don’t need to be a programmer to know if something is wrong with the code. This session will focus on training you to have a ‘sense of smell’ for bad code. So you can increase the serendipity in your explorations by having insights into which sections of code are particularly error-prone.
Let’s take a look at how quickly we can instill some design sense into fresh minds using Sparrow Decks. Sparrow decks are a rapid succession of 50-100 examples in a 3 minute burst. They allow the pattern recognition portion of the brain to spring in gear and do what it does best.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Quickly detect common code problems: bad names, clutter, long methods, long lines, duplication, inconsistency, and more

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Llewellyn Falco

Llewellyn Falco

Agile Coach, Spun Labs
Llewellyn Falco is an Agile Technical Coach specializing in Legacy Code and Test Driven Development. He is the creator of the open source testing tool ApprovalTests( www.approvaltests.com ), co-founder of TeachingKidsProgram ( www.teachingkidsprogramming.org ) and a PluralSight a... Read More →



Thursday August 10, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
I1

3:45pm

Infrastructure Patterns for Continuous Delivery (Nicolas Paez)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
You have read about continuous delivery and decided it will benefit your organisation. You talked to your colleagues and management; everyone has bought into the idea and your team is ready to start working. The organisation embraced agile a while back and is excited to add continuous deployment. Unfortunately, the operations infrastructure seems to be very far from what you need based on what you have read about continuous delivery. Too much is done manually. Your organisation has audit controls and other bureaucratic policies can't be ignored. Well, nobody said it would be easy! In this session you will discover a set of patterns and practices that will help you to prepare your infrastructure for a continuous delivery implementation.

Learning Outcomes:
  • A set of patterns that will help you prepare your infrastructure for a continuous delivery implementation.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Nicolas Paez

Nicolas Paez

Profesor, UBA & UNTREF
I am a software engineer with several years of experience in software development. I love teaching, I teach software engineering at the university. I work as an independent software engineer helping teams to adopt technical practices.I do believe that the main complexity in creating... Read More →



Thursday August 10, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
F1

3:45pm

An Appreciative Agile Mindset (Shawn Boockoff, John Eisenschmidt)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
An Appreciative Inquiry mindset reduces stress, enabling us to build on our strengths, which is more generative than eliminating weaknesses.
When one focuses on what is broken, they will invariably find problems. Traditional change methods focus on problem-finding, which can quickly overwhelm and cause us to focus on producing lower value solutions. 
Positive change can increase efficiency and sustain individuals and teams. Cultivating an appreciative approach within Agile teams helps members take different perspectives, ask powerful questions, and increase trust. The simple act of asking questions of a group using positive language creates the environment for trust and authentic change. Taking an appreciative mindset is generative and allows a team and organization to focus on the highest value and what it does well.
An appreciative mindset depends on assumptions, language, and questions. Our assumptions become our reality. The language we use supports our focus and reality. By being present to our language and perspective, a shift can occur in a team’s level of trust and value-focus. 
Participants will have the opportunity to practice individually and in groups to explore an appreciative mindset in community with their peers. These practices support positive, perspective taking, and trust building; standing in service to clients and team members, and building productive teams. 
Focusing on approaches to positive change, participants will learn practices that they can apply in their organizations or use with their agile teams.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn basic assumptions that form the foundation of an Appreciative mindset
  • Improve the ability to think differently and take away practice to support an appreciative approach to agile teams.
  • Grow the capacity to use language that enhances work
  • Increase the value a team produces

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Shawn Boockoff

Shawn Boockoff

Organizational and Agile Coach, Agile Kata
30 year proven track record of Leadership in transforming organizations, coaching individuals and teams, developing leaders, building effective teams,and implementing/ maintaining technology initiatives to support business objectives. Expertise in organizational leadership, professional... Read More →
avatar for John Eisenschmidt

John Eisenschmidt

Agile Coach & Atlassian Tools Consultant, Agile Kata
For nearly 20 years, John has coached high performance teams through transformational projects inside of corporations, nonprofits, higher education, and the federal government. As a Agile Coach and Program Manager, John has led numerous large and multi-year initiatives with colocated... Read More →



Thursday August 10, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Wekiwa 1&2

3:45pm

Introduction To Kanban (Prateek Singh, Daniel Vacanti)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Maybe you’ve heard a little about Kanban and want to learn more. Maybe you’ve started using Kanban and want some pointers on what pitfalls to avoid. Maybe your current Agile methodology is failing and you’re looking for a different approach. Whatever your reasons for desiring more exposure to Kanban, this talk is for you. This session will walk attendees through the fundamentals of Kanban using real world examples as the basis for the discussion. With the help of an engaging exercise, we will explain what Kanban is and what Kanban isn’t and give you the knowledge you need to get started. As a bonus, we'll offer some insight on how Kanban can help you answer that pesky little question, "When will it be done?" If nothing else, you’ll walk away with some ideas for improving the overall efficiency and predictability of your current process using flow principles. Come and join us to learn more about Kanban—you might just be surprised by what you hear.

Learning Outcomes:
  • An understanding of flow and what it means to manage flow
  • How Kanban facilitates the management of flow (including explaining what Kanban is and isn’t)
  • An introduction on how to use the principles of flow for better process predictability
  • Some ideas on how to get started with Kanban
  • Some things to watch out for during an initial roll out
  • Ideas on where your implementation can go next

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Prateek Singh

Prateek Singh

Principal Agile Coach, Ultimate Software
Prateek has been leading and working on agile teams for the past 10 years. Starting with XP, then Scrum and now working in a Kanban system, Prateek has gained a breadth and depth of knowledge regarding agile techniques, practices and implementation principles. Prateek is currently... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Vacanti

Daniel Vacanti

Co-founder and CEO, ActionableAgile
Daniel Vacanti is a 20-year software industry veteran who got his start as a Java Developer/Architect and who has spent most of the last 15 years focusing on Lean and Agile practices. In 2007, he helped to develop the Kanban Method for knowledge work. He managed the world’s first... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
I2

3:45pm

Lightning Talks

Abstract:
The purpose of the Lightning Talk Track is to provide a lightweight, flexible opportunity for speakers to share valuable information with participants. Presentations are short with one of the following formats:
3 minute Lightning Talk (no slides)
5 minute Lightning Talk (slides)
7 minute Pecha Kucha style presentation
The themes of lightning talks will follow the themes of the conference. e.g. People, Process at Scale, and Technology. Each session will contain approximately 10 presentations around one of these theme areas. This provides an opportunity for rapid and diverse learning on a variety of topics.
Currently Planned talks include:
  • Gene Gotimer - Creative Solutions to Already Solved Problems
  • Seth Ballard - Supporting Your Team's Continuous Integration Process As A Scrum Master
  • Mark Wavle - You're Asking the Wrong Questions! Getting Essential Feedback
  • Alex Basa - Creating a culture of psychological safety

Thursday August 10, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Wekiwa 3&4
 
Friday, August 11
 

9:00am

Open Jam (Paul Hammond)

Abstract:
Join us on Friday from 9:00 - 10:15 in Gatlin A&B for a unique Open Jam activity with Olaf Lewitz! Check out the Open Jam space during Agile2017 throughout the week for more details to unfold! You won't want to miss it!

Learning Outcomes:
  • *


Friday August 11, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
Gatlin A&B

10:45am

Banish Your Inner Critic v2.0 (Denise Jacobs)

Abstract:
Creating can be a tortured process. Sadly, this torture is often self-inflicted. The angst is not inherent in the creative process itself, but instead comes from the fears we have around our ability to produce. These fears manifest as the Inner Critic, which is the largest block to the flow of original ideas. But there's good news: you can break the power that Inner Critic wields over you to become a creative powerhouse!
In this talk, we’ll begin by exploring the origins of the Inner Critic and discover the tools that you already possess to vanquish it. Then we’ll dive into methods for dealing with the fear of being judged and criticized, how to transform highly critical self-talk into that of approval and encouragement, and ways to feel like your ideas are good enough and stop committing "ideacide."
By the end, you’ll have a roadmap of how to channel your creativity as a force for positive change in the world. The potential for greatness lies dormant in all of us. Banishing your Inner Critic is the first step to getting back in touch with the highly productive creative badass that you are and sharing your gifts with the world.

Learning Outcomes:
  • *

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Denise Jacobs

Denise Jacobs

Founder & CEO, The Creative Dose
Denise Jacobs is a Speaker + Author + Creativity Evangelist who speaks at conferences and consults with companies worldwide. As the Founder + CEO of The Creative Dose, keynote speaker, and trainer, she helps individuals in companies unleash their creativity through banishing their inner critic and hacking their creative brains. Denise’s keynotes and trainings give A Creative Dose™ – an injection of inspiration and immediately applicable... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Gatlin ABC