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Practicing [clear filter]
Monday, August 7
 

10:45am EDT

LeSS without Scrum (Yi Lv)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
The usual approach to scale Scrum is to start with one team as pilot then scale. This experience report provides a different approach. We focused on organization design first, without having proper Scrum implementation at team level. We used the main design elements from LeSS, but kept team level less changed. Then, we created demand to help some teams towards self-organization. We used the same approach in two different product units from the same company. The two units represented cases of different sizes, as cases of LeSS and LeSS Huge respectively.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Organization first approach while scaling Scrum
  • Incremental approach to expand domain specialization for more flexibility
  • Transitional path from traditional Team Leader to SM/Coach
  • Enable self-organization across teams via joint Scrum events
  • Enable one PO vs. multiple teams by getting teams on requirement clarification and direct feedback with SMEs and users

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Yi Lv

Yi Lv

Agile Coach, Odd-e
I live in Hangzhou, China. Have a daughter of 8-year old and enjoy spending time with her. Try to be helpful for some people. Practice systems thinking in large-scale Agile adoption.


Monday August 7, 2017 10:45am - 11:15am EDT
Wekiwa 1&2

10:45am EDT

Agile Coach Scorecard Anti-pattern or Opportunity ? (James Gifford)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Description:
There is a drive to prove the value of an Agile Coach in most large corporations. Agile Coaching is about soft skills and mentoring team members. It is hard to put numbers around that. The majority of coaches' reactions to this tends to be on the negative side. I was one of those coaches. That was until I was asked to create an Agile Coach Scorecard. This talk will review the criteria of the Scorecard.
The Scorecard focuses on team metrics, retrospective data, and resolving continuous improvement items. While these items focus on the output of teams and the organization, they can be used to steer teams and show a coach's value. Data trends in team metrics can show coaching suggestions to be presented to the team as option or areas of opportunity to the organization that are impeding teams from delivering.
Using data as a way to coach teams is also seen as taboo by a large part of the coaching community. I have had a lot experience from being in the racing world and my crew chief used data to coach me to wins. In one of the races, I was in second place and about a minute behind the leader, with three laps to go. I had the opportunity to overtake the leader unitizing the advantage of my trucks setup and a faster route. Right before entering the first section of the faster route, my crew chief came on reminding me of my dropping oil pressure. He urged me to not take the first section but to take the following two. The strain on engine with the low oil pressure could have resulted in the catastrophic failure of the engine. He was confident that based on the lap time trend, if I did this for the remaining three laps, there was a good chance that I would win.
What would have you done? Risk it all, ignoring the coaching and potential setting up the win, or follow the guidance to a win? If you want to know what I did and about data-driven coaching, attend this session.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Session Attendees will learn about how to create and use and Agile Coaching Scorecard. To show value in a large organization where the culture has not shift to more of an Agile mindset.


Speakers
avatar for James Gifford

James Gifford

Agile and Lean coach, Entech Consulting
James Gifford is an industry respected Agile/Lean coach that has executed multiple enterprise level transformation during his 14 year technology career. James is a cofounder and board member of the Agile Uprising. James has effectively had a positive impact on over 160 teams in a... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
H3

10:45am EDT

The Introverted Facilitator's Survival Guide (Oluf Nissen)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
As a Scrum Master or Agile Leader, one of your responsibilities is to facilitate various agile ceremonies to help teams become better at what they do. If you are among the 30-50% of people who are on the introverted side of the introvert/extrovert spectrum, it may be daunting for you to stand up in front of people and lead this type of work, especially if you're new in your role or new to the team.
This session will give a brief introduction to introversion, highlight some strengths introverts have, and provide tips for how to use those strengths and introvert characteristics before, during and after conducting a particular team ceremony: the retrospective. This is a highly interactive session in which our combined knowledge and experience will enrich the learning of the group as a whole.

Learning Outcomes:
  • What characterizes introversion
  • Strengths of introversion
  • How you can use introverted strengths in retrospective facilitation - before, during and after
  • How you can help introverted team members participate in retrospectives

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Oluf Nissen

Oluf Nissen

Software Design Engineer / Scrum Master, HP Inc.
Oluf Nissen is a software developer, Certified Scrum Master and Certified Scrum Product Owner working in the San Francisco Bay Area. He was introduced to Agile software development in the dark days of the Internet via links he found after reading The Cluetrain Manifesto, or so he... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
Wekiwa 9&10

10:45am EDT

How to Fail Your TDD Rollout: A Train Wreck Story (Chris Edwards)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
We dreamt of a future where our whole department embraced TDD. A future where the quality of our code and the product was elevated.
We had the best intentions, however, this story does NOT have a happy ending.
Learn from my experience working with the leaders of a department of 40 to attempt 100% TDD adoption. I will contrast this with our successful adoption and spread of SOLID design practices, and look at what we would have done differently with our TDD advocacy if we were to repeat it. Some of our lessons learned: Don't try to mandate TDD, bring in outside experts, and refactoring skills are key.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Pitfalls of a top-down approach to changing technical practices
  • Basic concepts of Lean-Change
  • How to grow technical skills across a larger group without micromanaging

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Chris Edwards

Chris Edwards

Software Development Manager, Solium
Chris is a software manager with Solium. Chris has had a variety of roles including developer, manager, Scrum Master and architect. He has a passion for how both technical excellence and transformational leadership can help drive agility.


Monday August 7, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
H1

10:45am EDT

Sustainable Legacy Code Refactoring: A Systematic and Stepwise Approach (Amr Noaman)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
One of the most painful activities in software development is maintaining extremely poor legacy code. Teams transitioning to Agile suffer from challenges like moving towards shorter iterations with limited time for regression testing, trying to cover poor code with automated tests, prioritizing which refactorings to apply on which code, and convincing managers with the value of refactoring.
In this session, I will present a simple, sustainable, and stepwise approach. This approach divides the effort to refactor legacy code into three stages:
  1. Quick-wins; simple and least risky enhancements
  2. Divide-and-conquer the code into functional, utility, and architectural components, with identified and clear component interfaces
  3. Inject-quality-in the code by wrapping components with automated tests
I will also give an overview of several experiments and case studies applying this approach and will present some interesting observations and insights about refactoring legacy applications. Finally, if time allows, I will drive you through some of the key roadmap activities to refactor (or tame) a large cluttered code base.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn about techniques to handle large backlog of technical debt in a gradual and sustainable way
  • Learn how to make refactoring visible and valuable and how to engage managers in large refactorings
  • Get to know famous techniques for "code componentization"
  • Learn how to harness technical changes for the overall product competitiveness

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Amr Noaman

Amr Noaman

Co-Founder & Principal Consultant, Agile Academy
Over the last 7 years, Amr’s primary role was to spread agile awareness and lean thinking in software organizations in Egypt and the Middle East. Amr is the co-founder of Agile Academy and Egypt's Lean & Agile Network, one of the largest Agile communities in the Middle East. In... Read More →



Monday August 7, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
Wekiwa 7&8

10:45am EDT

4 Characteristics of Good Goals (Christopher Avery)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Your goals might suck.
So many statements we call "goals" feel like burdens pushed on us, or that we push on ourselves, and less like something we are pulled toward. What if you knew how to determine whether a stated goal was a good goal or a sucky goal—before you committed to it? What if you could help peers, teams, and others assess their current goals and re-craft them into good goals (or drop them, or renegotiate them)?
The 4 characteristics of good goals—clarify intention, focus attention, remove obligation, generate energy— comes from a rigorous application of The Responsibility Proces to goal-setting. In this study, we asked Why do we take ownership of some goals and achieve them, but not others?
This will be an application workshop. Bring your goals—your annual performance goals, your S.M.A.R.T. goals, or any other kind of goals. We'll see how good they are and how they can be improved. Or discarded.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn the 4 characteristics of good goals
  • Rate at least one of your own goals against the 4 characteristics
  • Relate the characteristics of good goals to why you are making progress on some goals and not others
  • Refactor sucky goals that you want to be good goals, and release sucky goals that you don't want any more
  • Consider peer, team, and other leadership applications to assess and improve goals.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Avery

Christopher Avery

CEO, The Responsibility Company
UNLOCKING YOUR NATURAL ABILITY TO LIVE AND LEAD WITH POWER. Christopher Avery "The Responsibility Process guy" is a reformed management consultant. After a decade helping corporations help smart, ambitious professionals find ways to cope with lives they don't want and think they... Read More →



Monday August 7, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
I3

10:45am EDT

The Leadership Circle: An Agile Framework for Leadership Development (Peter Green, Mike O'Connor)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
If you want Agile to thrive in your organization, your top leaders have to not only support the shift, they must co-lead it. Agile is not simply a methodology that is implemented. It is a different way of thinking about running an organization to thrive in complexity. So what if leaders don't value Agile? This was my quandary for years until I discovered a leadership development model called The Leadership Circle. It is the most powerful tool that I've ever seen in helping individual leaders and teams of leaders make huge shifts in the way they see their purpose and possibility as leaders.
The Leadership Circle reveals a leader's Operating System: Internal assumptions (beliefs) that run behavior. It measures the two primary leadership domains– Creative Competencies and Reactive Tendencies–well-researched dimensions that directly impact a leader's capability to lead an Agile organization. In this session, you'll learn about these two domains, how they relate to success in creating Agile teams and organizations, and practice taking the two approaches to various challenges faced by session participants. Expect to walk away with concrete new ideas for how to help create more Agile teams and organizations!

Learning Outcomes:
  • * Understand the link between leadership development and successful Agile organizations
  • * Understand the two primary leadership stances: Reactive and Creative
  • * Gain insight into your own particular leadership tendencies
  • * New ideas about how to approach a specific challenge related to Agile adoption/transformation

Attachments:


Monday August 7, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
I2

10:45am EDT

Who are the People in Your Agilehood? (Matt Anderson)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Sesame Street brought together people from diverse backgrounds and famously asked "who are the people in your neighborhood?" Google has driven to create "fiberhoods" that connect communities with high-speed internet. Merging the two, the model Sesame Street started works for developing true Agile communities or "Agilehoods."
You can only learn so much from books, consultants and conferences. Some of the best learning experiences come from building learning communities where like-minded practitioners gather together to learn from each other on a regular basis.
Join Matt Anderson from Cerner Corporation as he shares best practices learned from establishing a community within the Kansas City area (Agilehood KC) as well as scaling to an international level with the Steve Denning Learning Consortium (SDLC). Matt was also a member of the Agile Leadership Network for establishing communities for 2 years leading to starting the KC community.
Learning communities serve multiple purposes and have been an offering of most of the global agile organizations with various levels of success. After 4 years of the Agilehood KC and 2 years with the SDLC, a model has been proven to help organizations truly learn from one another and focus on practices that they can apply immediately.
Your neighborhood is what you make it, but being a good neighbor builds learning opportunities not found anywhere else. Be the change you want to see in the world and join or create your own "Agilehood."

Learning Outcomes:
  • Key organizational models and practices for building a learning community at the local, regional, national or global level.
  • Patterns include:
  • 1) Define Your Purpose
  • 2) Pick Your Hat (Self Organizing Roles and Responsibilities)
  • 3) eHarmony Matching (Finding the best match for your needs)
  • 4) Lead the Commmunity
  • 5) Marketing
  • Key Decisions/Pitfalls
  • 1) Consultants - To Include or Not to Include?
  • 2) Dealing with Membership Changes
  • 3) NDAs and Conflicts of Interest
  • 4) Non-profit status

Attachments:

Speakers

Monday August 7, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
F2

11:30am EDT

Infusing an Agile Requirements Process in a Large DoD Program (Lymari Castro, Warren Smith)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Unlike commercial Agile practitioners, the Defense sector can rarely restructure their milestones for an Agile approach. The authors show how applying Agile to Systems Engineering (SE) (“Agile SE”) can overcome these constraints. Agile SE is a natural fit within today’s Defense Acquisition Lifecycle, and can therefore bring rapid benefits to one of the largest, most needy areas of development.
This Experience Report presents a case study of a successful Agile SE deployment on a major Defense system. The project used Agile SE to analyze the system requirements and develop requirement backlogs for multiple development teams, in time for the system requirements review (SRR) program milestone. This presentation will dive into the unique adaptation of SCRUM and storyboarding techniques to SE, accomplished with Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) tools, using Systems Modeling Language (SysML) Activity Diagrams and Sequence Diagrams for requirements analysis.
These techniques shook up the organization, and the bumps transforming the culture will be discussed. Ultimately, this approach was embraced and successfully accelerated the SRR milestone by 70%. Topics covered will include the importance and impact of rigid Defense Milestones like the SRR, the characteristics of “Agile SE”, assembling and wrangling the teams, eliminating the review cycle, and the specific Agile MBSE technical storyboard and allocation approaches.
The topics presented in this session are highly applicable to any project that uses a traditional waterfall approach but would like to swiftly adopt Agile in their current Systems Engineering processes. This Experience Report highlights that Agile SE can rapidly inject the benefits of Agile to existing Defense programs, whose IT and system budgets exceed 3x that of than any corporation.
Attendees of this session will learn:
• An overview of the DoD acquisition lifecycle challenges and limitations, and where it could be going
• The characteristics of Agile SE, and its work products
• A real-life case study of how Agile SE teams were assembled, organized and operated
• The MBSE approach, using SysML diagrams for storyboarding and allocation
• How the requirements backlogs were generated and allocated to each development team
The following people can benefit from attending this presentation: Scrum Facilitators or Product Owners, Systems Engineers, Project Engineers, Program Managers, Project Managers, business-capture teams, University Grant applicants, Agile champions, and organization leaders.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • In this presentation we will share the following lessons learned during the implementation of an agile requirement process in a large DoD program:
  • The specific approach used to apply Agile to Systems Engineering.
  • How developing SE work products in a team/scrum environment was highly efficient. Systems Engineering often has the reputation of being ponderous. As the time savings proves, developing SE work products in a team/scrum environment was a highly efficient approach to Systems Engineering.
  • The importance and practice of management to the effort. An effort such as this requires strong, persistent management support to ensure the various stakeholders remain engaged. This included tweaking the team based on team member’s knowledge, participation, etc.
  • The necessary skill set. The skill set of the facilitators was also key to success. These Systems Engineers needed to be part methodologist, part tool jockey, part diplomat and part politician, with an inexhaustible supply of energy during the concentrated effort.
  • Eliminating the review cycle. One major advantage anticipated at the beginning was eliminating the need to review the work products. By having all stakeholders involved in the effort: the end-users, the recipients of the requirements, the customer procuring the system, we demonstrated that this was indeed the case.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Lymari Castro

Lymari Castro

Systems Engineer, DoD
Lymari is a Systems Engineer at DoD. She is an Agile Systems Engineering subject matter expert at her organization. In her 14 years at DoD, she has been the Lead Systems Engineer of a DoD Major Systems Acquisition Program, Technical Director, Lead of the Systems Engineering Development... Read More →
avatar for Warren Smith

Warren Smith

Sr. Principal Systems Engineer, General Dynamics
My passion is vastly increasing Engineering Productivity through Agile Systems Engineering, MBSE and Engineering Re-Use Libraries.Improvements over 300% have been measured using Re-Use libraries and Agile SE using MBSE. Warren B. Smith is a Sr. Principal Systems Engineer at General... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Wekiwa 1&2

2:00pm EDT

Making the Change: Going Agile at the Department of Labor (Joey Spooner)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Going agile in the government is easy to say and hard to do. Teams and individuals prefer to stay apart and work on their own for weeks or months at a time. Documentation can quickly become more important than working software. Addressing the demands brought on by a change in administration, policy, or executive direction requires teams and individuals to start working together in order to succeed in their overall mission.
This lessons learned session will discuss the benefits, challenges, and outcomes when implementing Kanban in a traditional waterfall and silo working environment. Techniques for creating a continuous change towards an agile way of working will be shared. Performance data from a two year Kanban initiative at the Department of Labor will be reviewed and discussed. Participants will walk away with a clear understanding of how Kanban can break down silos, improve the agility of a traditional waterfall and silo focused organization, and noticeably improve performance.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Start simple to support adoption
  • It's easy to overload your process with policies and then fail to respect your process
  • Using games can speed up the adoption
  • Leadership matters in a government or bureaucratic environment
  • Measuring sooner rather than later can really help everyone (especially the team) to see the forest from the trees

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Joey Spooner

Joey Spooner

Kanban Coach and Trainer, TriTech Enterprise Systems
Joey Spooner is an Accredited Kanban Trainer and Kanban Coaching Professional at TriTech Enterprise Systems, Inc. In a 15 year career spanning the communications, insurance, higher education, non-profit, and government sectors, Joey has been a software developer, IT director, strategic... Read More →



Monday August 7, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm EDT
Wekiwa 1&2

2:00pm EDT

Wipeout! Make *New* Mistakes (Bernie Maloney)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Ever feel like the market moves faster than your marketing team? Or wonder how flexible your finance (and leadership!) teams would really be if self-direction glitched and blew a million dollars? Organizations introduce Agile believing it will lead in part to greater responsiveness and resiliency. Yet, why do so many fail to achieve those outcomes?
It isn’t just that they’re structured and operated by default along hierarchical lines rather than by design for iterative work. Achieving the full benefits of Agile comes from shifting the culture and mindset of a whole organization, sometimes as radically as encouraging it to “Make New Mistakes.” This very philosophy was a driver in the fastest division in HP’s history to reach $1B, a hardware division that was focused on manufacturing operations with razor thin margins, and markets that changed 3x faster than the development lead time.
Through a series of short stories and exercises, attendees will explore 5 practices from that business which led to roaring success. We’ll probe their parallels in Lean / Agile practice. With each one, you’ll briefly self-inspect the state of your own organization, as well as create a backlog you can use to adapt in your “real world” beyond the conference.
Do you have, or want, a vision that takes you beyond high performing teams, to a high performing, resilient business? Come hear how you can help your organization shift from mechanics that “do” Agile, and walk away with a feel for what’s possible when not just development but a whole organization surfs the flow of “being” Agile.

Learning Outcomes:
  • articulate the importance of having a clear, shared purpose to guide Agility
  • describe the framework of Situational Leadership and how to apply it to your own leadership style
  • identify two ways to clarify decision authority and where that clarity can be improved in your business
  • apply a simple "big picture" model to help match the Agile mindset to traditional business / project managment

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Bernie Maloney

Bernie Maloney

Agile Coach | Accelerating Genius, Persistent Systems
Bernie’s career started with a flash and a bang. Literally. His first position was designing devices that protect telephone networks from lightning strikes. A few career pivots later, he had a flash of insight: it was possible to tap into latent potential in every person, every... Read More →



Monday August 7, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
F2

2:00pm EDT

Agile Product Ownership: Do the Right Things, Not Everything (Ellen Gottesdiener)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Agile product owners feel the need to be in all places, all the time, with all people. To succeed, they need to be inventive, yet intensely focused; collaborative, yet decisive; far-sighted, yet detail-oriented. The best product owners are strategic—envisioning the product, communicating upstream with business executives, researching the market, and continually planning for delivery of high-value product options. Yet at the same time, they are also tactical—communicating downstream with the delivery team, running product demos, and discussing technical considerations.
Talk about a role that requires excellent balance and effective collaboration!
The good news is that it is possible to lighten your load and strengthen your product ecosystem so that you can make space for the right things amidst the clutter of everything. The key is to collaboratively examine the work of product ownership.
This workshop will identify the responsibilities and disciplines involved in the product owner role. We’ll explore the strategic and tactical work of agile product ownership, examine decision-making rules apply to the work of product ownership, and then use a fast-paced game to determine the level of delegation that is appropriate for product ownership work.
Whether you are a product owner, agile coach, or team member, this workshop will provide you with activities you can bring back to your product community to start improving your work processes right away. You’ll leave with new perspectives on ways you can eliminate unnecessary work and strengthen your support system so that you can concentrate on the right things to do instead of trying to do everything.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify the strategic and tactical work involved in product ownership
  • Appreciate the value of transparent decision making
  • Understand when and how agile team members can collaboratively support product owners
  • Consider what product owner activities can be delegated, when, and to whom

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ellen Gottesdiener

Ellen Gottesdiener

Product Coach, EBG Consulting, Inc.
Ellen is a Product Coach and CEO of EBG Consulting focused on helping product and development communities produce valuable outcomes through product agility. Ellen is known in the agile community as an instigator and innovator for collaborative practices for agile product discovery... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
F1

2:00pm EDT

Designing Business Outcomes #noprojects (Evan Leybourn)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
In most agile teams, the focus on delivering projects has continued to distance them from what's important - delivering value to their customers.
All too often we’ve been measuring activity and cost, not outcomes and value. And it’s important to understand that an organisation that plans for growth outcomes (without binding a team to a specific output) can fundamentally adapt to a changing market. By creating clearly defined, non-conflicting, outcomes and common working principles senior management can delegate the “how” to their teams, while retaining ownership of the “what” and “why”.
This interactive presentation will help participants define the real outcomes and associated measures for their work and teams. Participants will come to understand that outcomes can be complex, interdependent and occasionally conflicting. Therefore we will create 3 elements;
  1. the profile of the outcome,
  2. the relationship between outcomes, and
  3. the principles that align work across all outcomes
Without binding a team to a specific output, an organisation that understands, and plans for, growth outcomes can fundamentally adapt to a changing market. Governance controls come in the form of common working principles and clearly defined, non-conflicting, outcomes. In this way, senior management can delegate the ‘how’ to their teams, while retaining ownership of the ‘why’.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Introduce #noprojects - The alignment of activities to outcomes, measured by value, constrained by guiding principles and (optionally) supported by continuous delivery technologies.
  • The importance of outcomes
  • How to create an outcome profile
  • How to create constraining principles

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Evan Leybourn

Evan Leybourn

Founder, Business Agility Institute
Evan is the Founder and CEO of the Business Agility Institute; an international membership body to both champion and support the next-generation of organisations. Companies that are agile, innovative and dynamic - perfectly designed to thrive in today’s unpredictable markets. His... Read More →



Monday August 7, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
H4

2:00pm EDT

Getting Real without Getting Fired — Saying things in a way people can hear (Allison Pollard, Marcus King)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Are important words often left unsaid at your place of work? Do you feel like you're navigating a complex maze in conversations? Does your message tend to miss the mark with co-workers, who increasingly seem to be impediments to reaching your goals? Are these unspeakable truths in your workplace that you wish someone would resolve for you?
Trust and communication issues within the workplace can hollow out an organization. Invisible lines get drawn. Alternate forms of communication open up to subvert perceived rivals. Allies are recruited, reinforcing an us vs. them behavior cycle. Organizations are suffering from a lack of trust, and it's costing them speed, productivity, and collaboration. What can YOU do about it?
Regardless of your title, you can be a leader in your organization, and a leader's first job is to inspire trust. In this session, Allison and Marcus will share models to evaluate your own behaviors and facilitate activities to help you find your voice for speaking the truth in a way that builds trust. Softening the truth can feel comfortable in low trust environments--it's simpler, nicer, and can make you look like a team player. It can also lead to miscommunication, undelivered news, and blame shifting. On the other hand, saying the truth in all of its ugliness is risky and potentially career-limiting. Finding the sweet spot of communication to become a trusted leader takes self-awareness and practice. Attend this workshop and learn to recognize how your behavior is building trust--or not--and practice speaking hard truths so that others can hear it.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Recognize your current state, self, and patterns of communication that might indicate a low trust environment
  • A model to identify the communication cycles that hamper your organization from achieving its full potential
  • Pattern to practice better forms of direct communication and build trust, which can also be used to get feedback from others

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Marcus King

Marcus King

Principal Consultant, Improving
An avid technologist, I love all things tech. I have a passion for good enterprise and application architecture, and am a proponent of technology solving business problems. Outside of technology, I love old cars and traveling.
avatar for Allison Pollard

Allison Pollard

Agile Coach, Improving
Allison Pollard helps people discover their Agile instincts and develop their coaching abilities. As an Agile coach with Improving in Dallas, Allison enjoys mentoring others to become great Scrum Masters and fostering communities that provide sustainability for Agile transformations... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
I4

2:00pm EDT

Measure Learning with a Dojo Dashboard (Jason Tice)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
The agile manifesto call for individuals, teams, and organizations to foster a culture of continuous learning; however, how do we measure learning to know if we are making progress towards this call? Join us at Agile2017, for a hands-on workshop where you will learn a series of team and cross-team collaboration activities to identify and share learning goals, and then measure progress towards learning goal attainment.
Using a series of collaborative activities, workshop participants will experience how to create a self-organized “Dojo” for learning. A “Dojo” is a Japanese concept for a designated place where people practice to improve. Traditionally, dojos focus on martial arts practice; however, within the agile community, dojos in various forms are becoming a pattern for teams to focus on learning. Within our “Dojo”, teams will use metaphor to share challenges they are encountering, then will identify what they need to learn to improve. These learning goals provide the basis for measurement of learning and will be captured via a “Dojo Dashboard”. This dashboard provides a central viewpoint of learning needs across teams. The dashboard enables team members to share what they know, and enables teams and team members to learn from each other to achieve learning goals.
In this workshop, participants will simulate the creation a “Dojo” to capture team learning needs and create a “Dojo Dashboard” to measure learning goals as they are attained. Participants will leave having experienced collaborative activities that support a pattern to measure learning at the individual, team or organization levels.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will learn what a “Dojo” is and how “Dojo” activities can support learning within agile teams and organizations.
  • Participants will see how guiding Dojo learning activities through collaboration creates data by which organizational learning can be measured.
  • Participants will experience a series of collaboration activities that can support a bottom-up / grass-roots Dojo initiative providing learning benefits with minimal additional investment.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jason Tice

Jason Tice

Vice President, Asyncrhony
Jason Tice has over 15 years of experience using collaborative activities and games to help organizations, their teams and their customers achieve clarity and alignment to enable high performance. More recently, Jason has led efforts to adapt collaboration frameworks familiar to agile... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
I1

2:00pm EDT

7 Sources of Waste in Automated Testing and How To Avoid Them (Jonathan Rasmusson)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Thousands of hours are wasted every year maintaining poorly written suites of automated tests. Not only do these tests slow teams down, they sap morale, and are a huge time sink. By learning what these seven wastes are teams can avoid much of the dysfunction and waste that comes with most early automation efforts. And instead get to adding value faster by applying a few simple techniques.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to get your team on the same page when it comes to automated testing
  • How to get testers and developers seeing each other's points-of-view when it comes to writing automated tests
  • How to establish the necessary baseline, culture, language, and rules of thumb around where and when to write different kinds of automated tests
  • How to avoid much of the waste and dysfunction that comes with early automation testing efforts

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Rasmusson

Jonathan Rasmusson

Engineer, Spotify
Agile, testing, programming, automation, culture. Author of: The Agile Samurai and The Way of the Web Tester


Monday August 7, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
I3

2:00pm EDT

Evolving Your Testing Strategy: Mapping Now, Next, and Later (David Laribee)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Pyramids? Quadrants? Cupcakes?! There are a wide array of models that describe approaches to test automation strategy in terms of best practice or anti-pattern. While these models are useful for visually communicating how your team currently manages (or should manage) software quality, no single model represents a complete strategy in and of itself.
In this talk, we’ll begin by framing the universe of Agile testing models: models that range from technical to product to cultural mindsets. I’ll add detail and nuance to each of these models in the form of professional experience, challenges with introduction, and case study. We'll look at the strengths of weaknesses of each model in terms of the constraints it adopts (and ignores). We'll also learn about the social costs of incorporating or abandoning each approach.
With a new lens, focused on testing strategy as an act of curation, I'll share an approach to mapping, evolving, and iterating a testing strategy appropriate for your product development team's specific context.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand common test strategy models in terms of their constraints, strengths, and weaknesses.
  • Learn how each may create confrontation or limitations in certain organizational contexts with well-defined tester/developer roles.
  • Combine constraints and classic models to describe your current testing strategy visually with a map.
  • Create a model that describes a desired future state of testing strategy.
  • Identify decisions--and their inherent challenges--necessary to change strategy for a large organization with a complex system.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for David Laribee

David Laribee

Principal, Nerd/Noir
David Laribee is a product development coach with deep roots in Lean, Agile, XP and Scrum. He believes in the power of collaboration, simplicity and feedback. Over the last 20 years, David has built teams and products for companies at every scale. He’s founded startups and consulted... Read More →



Monday August 7, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
H1

3:45pm EDT

Drama Geek: How Eating Pretend Ice Cream Made Me a Better Scrum Master (Cass Van Gelder)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Cass Van Gelder admits it: her parents cringed when she told them she was majoring in theatre. "Ugh! You'll never find a job!" her mother cried.
Fast-forward twenty+ years, and not only does she have a job, she has a thriving, fun career at Video Gaming Technologies, Inc. Though not in drama (she does still experience some), she liberally applied her theatrical background and put it to good Agile use!
From planning gigantic theatrical productions on small budgets to acting out difficult conversations, learn how she applied the crazy, fun world of theatre to the wonderful theater of Agile.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Improvisation
  • Project Management
  • Working with a Limited Budget
  • Working with a Limited Timeframe
  • Dealing with Very Different People and Cultures
  • Sympathizing and Empathizing
  • Becoming a Jack-of-All-Trades
  • Hard work
  • Having Difficult Conversations
  • Presentation Skills
  • Doing the Best You Can with What You’ve Got

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Cass Van Gelder

Cass Van Gelder

Scrum Master, CSM, CSP, Video Gaming Technologies, Inc. (VGT)
Cass Van Gelder hails originally from Arkansas - by way of New York, San Francisco, and even Las Vegas, where she worked with Second City, the San Francisco Lyric Opera, and multiple, large theatrical productions, including the first North American performance at the MGM Grand of... Read More →



Monday August 7, 2017 3:45pm - 4:15pm EDT
Wekiwa 1&2

3:45pm EDT

Working Through Stressful Conflict (Mike Lowery, Caroline Sauve)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
As coaches, managers, or team members - we've all encountered situations in the workplace where a conversation moves in a matter of seconds from "constructive conflict" into "stressful conflict". However, working effectively through stressful interactions in the moment is a skill that we rarely have the opportunity to practice in a safe environment.
In this workshop, we'll begin by exploring the differences between constructive and stressful conflict and establish the different behaviours that can bring forth these stressful interactions. We'll then quickly move into a series of practice exercises and provide key facilitation techniques to help you support a more healthy interaction both one-on-one and on your team.
In short, you will walk away from this workshop with new skills and techniques to help yourself and others have a more productive and stress free interactions. Most importantly, applying these new skills will create the possibility for deeper, more meaningful and more relevant discussions both one-on-one and as a team.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Effectively identify when interactions move from "constructive" to "stressful"
  • Understand the spectrum of different "styles under stress", including becoming aware your own personal style
  • Collaboratively practice and experiment with key facilitation responses to stressful outbursts, improving skills for working through these situations in the moment
  • Develop the ability to re-frame individuals and teams prone to stressful interactions into a positive or neutral position by transforming the path to action from stressful or constructive

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Mike Lowery

Mike Lowery

Agile Coach, Essentially Agile
Gentle curiosity and relentless patience can get you a long way.
avatar for Caroline Sauve

Caroline Sauve

Coach, InsideOutAgile
Thoughtful curiosity leads to insight. Caroline is a Professional Integral Coach at InsideOutAgile who is passionate about developing increasing levels of leadership capability and cultural maturity within Agile organizations. To learn more and get connected visit: https://inside... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
Wekiwa 7&8

3:45pm EDT

Hello? Is there anyone there? How to engage with distributed teams. (Samantha Laing, Karen Greaves)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
In the ideal perfect world there will be rainbows and unicorns and teams that all sit together. In reality, most teams have to deal with distribution in one form or another. For some: it’s team members spread across a building, for others it’s team members in other parts of the world in different time zones.
Have you even been on a call where you can hear someone ordering coffee, or a dog barking? My favorite is being told someone is joining the call, after you've spent 5 minutes explaining something in detail. Mostly distributed meetings are boring, and not really worth the time and effort.
As agile coaches we truly value face to face communication and visible boards and sticky-notes, we also value working from anywhere, having pets in the office and not having to travel. So what is possible here? We decided to fully immerse ourselves into the distributed world and see what happened. We were amazed - we managed to build trust, explore and discover great collaborative tools and we improved communication.
We would like to share some of our discoveries and tips with you. Join us to explore how agile can work for distributed teams.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Cultivate a mindset of exploring possibility rather than resenting distribution
  • Understand how distribution affects your team
  • Know when distribution is actually an advantage
  • Know what is possible given your situation
  • Tips we have learned from working with distributed teams

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Karen Greaves

Karen Greaves

Agile Coach, Growing Agile
I love meeting new people so come introduce yourself. Check out www.growingagile.co.nz to see what I look like, or just listen for the loudest person in the room :)
avatar for Samantha Laing

Samantha Laing

Agile Coach, Nomad8
My personal motto is ‘be brave’, and I embody this by taking on challenges one small step at a time.Most of my career has been in the IT industry, specifically Software Development. Nowadays I find myself coaching others with a passion for agile and a focus on self-care.I love... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
I2

3:45pm EDT

Only Responsible Leaders Can Collaborate in a High-Functioning Team (Ronica Roth, Christine Hudson)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Christopher Avery's responsibility process describes the phases we go through on our way to taking real responsibility.
Patrick Lencioni describes the five dysfunctions of team, and by extension the five behaviors of a high-functioning, collaborative team.
Jean Tabaka taught us how to facilitate collaboration by creating safety in a room and on a team and by ensuring that all voices are heard.
In this highly interactive workshop, we will explore together what happens we are a stuck in something less than a place of responsibility, and what impact that has on our ability to collaborate effectively on a team.
Then we will explore how working our way to a place of responsibility also helps us create and contribute to a healthy team, and how to facilitate a team that can collaborate to create great things.
Attendees will walk away with a set of working agreements--and a process you can run with your team--that can help you and your team reach performance and responsibility.

Learning Outcomes:
  • * Understand the effects of responsibility (or its lack) on ourselves and the team
  • * How awareness of both models helps us improve our own behavior, which in turn helps us improve team dynamics.
  • * Specific actions to help a team become healthier
  • * Facilitation techniques specifically designed to create safety in the room and to ensure all voices are heard

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Christine Hudson

Christine Hudson

Advisor, Enterprise Agility, CA Technologies
Christine is helping CA Technologies transform to modern strategy deployment and product delivery methods. She is a skilled facilitator who brings positivity, deep empathy, and an appreciation for each individual to help create high performing teams and focused strategies. Christine... Read More →
avatar for Ronica Roth

Ronica Roth

Advisor & Lead, Agile Practice Development, CA Technologies
Ronica’s passion is to help companies become collaborative organizations that honor the individual, give everyone the chance to do what they do best, and harness the power of team to amplify great work--all in service of creating learning organizations that produce great stuff (including... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
H3

3:45pm EDT

Create Software Quality (David Bernstein)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
This session will help you quantify key software qualities that drop the cost of testing, maintaining, and extending code. Quality in delivered software is intangible and different from quality in physical goods. Some external attributes of software quality—free from defects and easy to maintain—are reflections of the code’s internal qualities. When we build classes and methods that are cohesive, non-redundant, well-encapsulated, assertive, testable, and explicitly coupled, they are less prone to bugs and far easier to read, test, debug, and maintain. Paying attention to these code qualities helps focus us on the principles, patterns, and practices used by expert developers.
If you don’t pay attention to critical code quality attributes, iterative development practices can quickly degrade code into a maintenance nightmare. Join software development consultant and author David Bernstein and take a deep dive into the code qualities that make software more maintainable and less bug-friendly. Create software that not only provides value now but is easy to change and extend so it can continue to deliver value far into the future.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Explore six code qualities that make code easier to change
  • Identify six code pathologies and why they’re bad
  • Use the Single Responsibility Principle to increase cohesion
  • Distinguish between redundancy and duplication
  • Understand encapsulation as hiding “how” with “what”
  • Increase assertiveness of code by keeping state with behavior
  • See how testability directly reflects code quality

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for David Bernstein

David Bernstein

Consultant, To Be Agile
David Scott Bernstein is the author of the new book _Beyond Legacy Code: Nine Practices to Extend the Life (and Value) of Your Software._ It’s an insider’s view of the software industry drawn from his decades of hands-on experience as a software developer, trainer, and consultant... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
H4

3:45pm EDT

Onboarding with the Mob (Sheldon Fuchs, Ravdeep Sekhon)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Onboarding can be difficult, especially when growing a team by 100% or more in a short period of time. How can you ensure that the practices your team believes in are spread to new hires? When growing this quickly how can you ensure that beliefs in things like test driven development, boy scout coding and incremental architecture don't get lost in the explosion? How can you mentor when half or more of your team has been around for less than a year?
This presentation will describe the specific approaches we have used to onboard new developers, and delve into what we've learned. We'll talk about some of our failures and show some of our successes. As with any development practice we'll show how we've used continuous improvement to tweak our onboarding practices, ensuring that our new members get up to speed very quickly and contribute almost immediately.

Learning Outcomes:
  • mob-programming is the best way to learn
  • safe spaces in development can be super effective
  • pair-programming alone is not enough
  • embedding with a team right away is not enough
  • onboarding needs to be continuously examined

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Sheldon Fuchs

Sheldon Fuchs

Staff Software Developer, Solium
A software developer with technical leadership tendencies. I've been involved in development in various levels for over 20 years. Recently my focus has shifted more to building better teams (and people!), and if I really have to I'll get involved in process as well. More personally... Read More →
avatar for Ravdeep Sekhon

Ravdeep Sekhon

Software Dev Manager, Solium
A developer before entering the world of Management, coaching & building teams, interviews & hiring. Have worked with teams during their transition and helped them with adopting Agile Principles.



Monday August 7, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
Wekiwa 6

3:45pm EDT

Leveling Up at Scale: How to find your target and aim for it! (Steve Holyer)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Are you ready to scale successfully?
Your success depends on management structures, relationships, and organizational culture. It also depends on the skills, tools, and practices your teams are mastering.
What investments are required to create the environment that cultivates progress and mastery of team skills and capabilities at scale?
What are the benefits you can expect in return?
  • Do you need consistent and sustainable team focus on producing value that is fully aligned with business goals?
  • Do you need high-quality, predictable, and reliable continous delivery capabilities that come from mastering technical and engineering practices?
  • Do you need to be a disrupter? Do you need to achieve the goal of optimizing value through business agility?
Help your teams chart a path to an agreed-upon goal of mastery.
In this hands-on session you will work together with others who share your passion in order to uncover strategies that develop team proficiency and produce the outcomes your business and customers need. Plan your investment strategy in Agile Practices at the team level to help you gain new insights for working at scale.
We will be working with the team-based Agile Fluency™ Model from James Shore and Diana Larsen to understand your individual teams' development. We will explore what the model can teach us about mastery that supports scaling your Agile principles and practice while you create an environment that fits your customer and business needs best.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Explain how teams learn through deliberate practice that support success at scale no matter which scaling principles and processes are emerging in your organisation.
  • Ask the right questions to evaluate scaling frameworks in terms of the principles and practices that fit your organisation best.
  • Identify the zones of the Agile Fluency Model and show how they apply tp your teams.
  • Understand how skills and practices may change as teams become more fluent.
  • Encourage the environment your organisation needs to develop proficient fluency at the next level—and the right level for your organisation.


Speakers
avatar for Steve Holyer

Steve Holyer

Agile PO Coach and Trainer, engage-results.com
Steve Holyer is a product ownership coach, trainer, facilitator and consultant helping product organisations unleash value and deliver results. Principal consultant at Steve Holyer and Associates in Zurich Switzerland; he is an international speaker and trainer on Scrum and Agile... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
I1

3:45pm EDT

Shift your Blind Spots to Bling Spots for Agile Success! (Jake Calabrese)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
As leaders, we often talk about how we wished people or teams would step-up. We dream of teams taking the initiative. We spend our time wondering “why empowered people won’t act?” Instead of wondering, we need to start by taking a hard look at ourselves – our blind spots may be the impediment to our people’s, team’s, and organization’s success! Of course, the funny thing about blind spots is, people hear about them and say, “whew, I’m sure glad I don’t have any!” Should you feel that you don’t have any blind spots, you are welcome to attend for a “friend.”
Jake will introduce a straightforward model you can utilize when you find yourself questioning someone’s motives or applying blame. While questioning and blaming are normal human reactions, we can’t afford to be stuck in that head-space. We must lead by example, improving ourselves, and then helping the people we lead improve! Attendees will have the opportunity to work through scenarios that are relevant to them, unraveling blind spots, adapting the model, questioning assumptions, and learning countermeasures to turn blind spots into Bling Spots – so everyone can shine!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Assess common leadership thoughts and statements that slow or prevent success.
  • Learn a straightforward Leadership Assumption-Decision Model to help discover blind spots.
  • Discover some of your own blind spots in leading people to success.
  • Consider the challenge of maintaining a leadership mindset and how your blind spots limit you.
  • Create action(s) to address your blind spots and turn them into Bling Spots.
  • Fun.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jake Calabrese

Jake Calabrese

Leadership & Team Coach & Trainer, Agile For All
Jake Calabrese is a coach, trainer, and coach-consultant working to help organizations meet the promise of agile by going beyond agile practices to address culture challenges and help teams and leaders reach and maintain high performance. He has unique expertise as an Organization... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
H2

3:45pm EDT

Pairing: The Secret Sauce of Agile Testing (Jess Lancaster)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Finding time to learn test techniques, mentor other testers, grow application knowledge, and cross-train your team members is a daunting task with a complicated recipe. What if you could do these things while testing and finding bugs? Enter Pair Testing. What’s that? Two people testing together where one operates the keyboard in exercising the software and the other participant suggests, analyzes, and notates the testing outcomes. And it’s the secret sauce of agile testing because it makes your routine, bland testing so much more fun and productive! Testers on Jess Lancaster’s team use pair testing not only to make better software but also to foster better team relationships along the way. Jess explores why pairing works, how to run an effective pairing session, how to pair with others on the team, such as project managers, designers, developers, and just how easy it is to get started with pairing. Armed with Jess’ easy-to-use Pair Testing recipe card, plan your first pairing encounter so you are ready to roll when you get back to the office. This sounds easy enough, but you know there will be mistakes when you try it. Jess has you covered there, too. Learn his team’s pairing mistakes and the things his team did to improve their pairing sessions.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Why pairing works, and reasons why you as a tester or agile team member need to be pairing
  • How to get started with pairing using a step-by-step process that leads to successful sessions
  • Learn my team’s pair testing mistakes and what we did to improve so you don't make the same mistakes
  • Pairing with other team members in differing roles, in addition to different ideas for pairing, such as test design, user stories, and bug reports
  • How to use the pairing recipe for making this secret sauce back at your workplace
  • Hands-on exercise with planning pairing sessions so that you can take it back to the office and pair with a co-worker!

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jess Lancaster

Jess Lancaster

QA Practice Manager, TechSmith
Jess Lancaster is the QA practice manager at TechSmith, the makers of Snagit, Camtasia, and other visual communication software applications. He coaches and equips testers with the skills to be quality champions on agile teams. With more than twenty years of information systems and... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
F4

4:30pm EDT

Why Data Can Be Both Detrimental and Invaluable to Change Initiatives (Michael McCalla)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Another movement sweeping through the corporate world with the same steam as Agile is that of Business Intelligence & Big Data. I always gravitated to data and enjoy identifying patterns to tell a story. I am also a passionate Agilist, playing the role of change agent in Agile Transformations. Therefore, my natural inclination has always been to couple the two together to drive change. Unfortunately, the sad truth is this approach has not always lead to the desired outcome.
Like everything else that could be used for good, unfortunately, data can also be leveraged for evil. This paper and talk centers on the power of data and the ability for it to be both detrimental and invaluable to change initiatives. I have learned the hard way that without an environment of safety, experimentation, and short feedback loops, collecting team metrics and insights can actually lead to more harm than good. However, once the prerequisite of safety is established, data no longer becomes your enemy as a change agent, but your ally, and a powerful tool in your Agile coaching toolbox.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • 1. Collecting data in many different forms can be used as another feedback loop in Agile environments.
  • 2. Data can be used to do more harm than good in the early stages of Agile adoption
  • 3. The culture of the organization will drive whether or not it is safe for change agents to introduce team metrics. Without a culture that promotes an environment of safety, trust, and feedback, data will not help the cause.
  • 4. For more mature Agile organizations, data is no longer your enemy as a change agent, but your ally, and a powerful tool in your Agile coaching toolbox.
  • 5. There are many different techniques for collecting data related to teams, it all depends what the organization wants to achieve.
  • 6. Aggregating data points to to tell a meaningful story helps Agile coaches identify coaching needs, continuous improvement opportunities, and investment decisions.

Attachments:

Speakers

Monday August 7, 2017 4:30pm - 5:00pm EDT
Wekiwa 1&2
 
Tuesday, August 8
 

9:00am EDT

The final frontier; Aligning the enterprise's direction and your crew's efforts (Sean Barrett)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Are you confident all your teams are delivering on your corporate strategy? Shortly after deciding to go "All in on Agile" across the entire Vistaprint business unit, we began experimenting with an enterprise-wide Agile release planning tool we call the Enterprise Visibility Room. It is forcing us to finally confront our addiction to working on every good idea we think we've ever had, all at the same time. It motivates us to say no, not yet, and to focus intently on our highest value ideas. Through that intense focus, we align our collective efforts to the core of our strategy, balance our supply and demand and increase the flow of value to our customers.
The Enterprise Visibility Room centers on a single, prioritized, enterprise backlog of strategic outcomes. It requires clear descriptions of value for each and every outcome. It visualizes all teams necessary to deliver that value and where each team is actively working. Five ceremonies embody the formal operation of the Room: prioritization, planning, scrum of scrums stand-ups, demonstrations, and retrospectives, all occurring throughout a quarterly cycle.
Peak inside the journey we have taken, hear the lessons learned, the missteps, and unexpected discoveries. Gather insights into which factors enabled us to take this major step in our enterprise Agile transformation, and imagine what an idea like this could do for your organization.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • We have been working on too many top priorities simultaneously across our organization and it has been slowing down our flow of value delivery.
  • Being clear about where the value lies in a given idea and how we will recognize it has been achieved, creates powerful alignment between idea generators and idea implementers.
  • Functional silos are impeding our ability to execute cross functional work and slowing our flow of value delivery.
  • Using the language and approach of genuine experimentation has proven to be a very successful means of introducing change within our organization by keeping any unknowns in line with the organization's tolerance for risk.
  • Allowing the teams' representatives, the primary participants of the EVR, to own, adapt and reshape the tool and process to their needs fostered rapid creative solutions to long standing coordination difficulties, extreme swarming experimentation and ensured high levels of continuing engagement of the participants.
  • Transparency of enterprise level information led to surprising and unexpected benefits for people and teams across the organization.
  • It requires a significant mind shift for organizational leaders to stop focusing on their area of specialty and instead optimize for the whole of the enterprise.
  • Executing enterprise level work in small increments allows for faster feedback, early value delivery, and regular opportunities to adapt to changing circumstances.
  • A single prioritized enterprise backlog is difficult to create, but a powerful tool for aligning teams across the organization.
  • Executive support and active participation are necessary for coordination at the enterprise level to occur successfully.
  • Not all participating parts of the organization have benefitted equally yet from the Enterprise Visibility Room - there is more to learn and achieve.
  • The timing needs to be right for an effort like this to take root in an organization.
  • A single physical representation of all work across the enterprise created a level of understanding and engagement that previous digital information systems have never achieved.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Sean Barrett

Sean Barrett

Enterprise Agile Coach, Vistaprint
With twenty years of experience in technology, from startups to Financial giants, my Agile journey began in the world of Lean and Kanban. By completing the Emergn Expert Coaching Pathway, my awareness of and passion for the interconnected worlds of Agile, Lean, Business Agility and... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am EDT
Wekiwa 1&2

9:00am EDT

Holistic Agile: Developing the Future Agile Company (Robert Woods, Tony Shawver)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Stop treating the symptoms and treat the whole organism...or organization! Companies are undergoing an evolution and it is imperative that we understand what the evolution is, how it impacts you personally and how you adapt to the change taking place. As Agile methods find more global applicability, we are quickly finding groups outside of IT who have nothing to do with technology or software development demonstrating success with Agile methods. But the approach to the specific solutions they deliver are often catered to their own unique circumstances. The original Agile manifesto, principles and supporting frameworks we have been teaching were formed with software development in mind but, from a holistic perspective, a similar yet unique approach is needed for enterprise solutions outside of IT.
As both day to day practitioners and Agile champions, how can we translate the success seen in Agile software delivery to parts of the organization who want to see the same types of successes but don't deliver technology as its core solution? Where are we seeing trends in non-technology based solution delivery applying agility? Does a more "holistic" approach to Agile adoption change both what and how we teach? Does Holistic Agile force us to rethink the founding Agile principles we have worked so hard to adhere to and if so, what does that look like? Finally, what impact does a more holistic approach have on both defining and facilitating Enterprise Agile Transformation? Robert Woods & Tony Shawver, Directors of the National Agile Practice for MATRIX, will answer these questions and help attendees see how Holistic Agile is redefining what an Agile Company looks like and how we help them get there.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - An understanding of what Holistic Agile means
  • - Where we are seeing the biggest trends outside of software delivery
  • - How Holistic Agile changes the way we approach facilitating Agile transformation
  • - How to engage an organization in a more Holistic way.
  • - How the foundational Agile values and principles are impacted by Holistic Agile approaches.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Tony Shawver

Tony Shawver

National Agile Practice Lead, MATRIX
Tony Shawver serves as Director and National Agile Practice leader at MATRIX. Joining MATRIX in 2010, Tony possesses over 16 years of experience in leading technology projects including implementation, software application development, consulting and coaching. His technical experience... Read More →
avatar for Robert Woods

Robert Woods

Director National Agile Practice, MATRIX
Robert Woods serves as Director of the National Agile Practice at MATRIX. He has been in IT for over 20 years serving in such roles as Sr. Systems and Networking Engineer, Project Manager, Program Manager, and Agile Coach. Robert has spent years working with organizations on collaborative... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am EDT
F3

9:00am EDT

Surviving Backdraft (or How to Not Die in a Hellish Explosion of Dysfunction) (Adam Weisbart)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Each year, highly trained and experienced firefighters die due to backdraft. Backdraft occurs when oxygen is reintroduced into an airtight room from which all the air has been burnt out. When a firefighter opens the door to one of these smoldering rooms, air suddenly floods in to the space, giving the remaining fuel the oxygen it needs to violently explode.
As agilists, we aim to help our teams and organizations uncover dysfunction. We help breathe new life into areas that have been neglected or ignored for years. Just as adding oxygen to a smoldering room can be a life threatening experience, shedding light on dysfunction within a team or organization can lead to reactions ranging from discomfort to violent opposition.
In this workshop you'll learn mindfulness techniques you can use immediately to help mitigate internal backdraft (uncomfortable feelings that can arise from helping take care of your team and organization) and external backdraft (negative reactions by the organization or individuals that can crush an agile initiative). We'll leverage the work of Dr. Kristin Neff (one of the world’s leading experts on self-compassion) and clinical psychologist Dr. Chris Germer to help us deal with the discomfort that can arise due to backdraft, along with Adam's own techniques for helping surface and highlight organizational dysfunction.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn techniques for immediately dealing with internal backdraft as it arises throughout the day
  • Learn how self-compassion can help caretakers like agile coaches, scrum masters, and change agents work with their team and organizations through massive dysfunction without burning out
  • Practice approaches for helping teams surface challenges that are affecting their work
  • Learn a technique for compassionate listening to help you be present for coworkers dealing with difficult challenges without burning out

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Adam Weisbart

Adam Weisbart

Corporate Agilist, Weisbart Consulting, Inc
Adam Weisbart’s humorously irreverent approach to the serious work of organizational change helps teams and individuals break out of old patterns and discover new ways to improve. His belief that hard work need not be a somber affair infuses everything he does. Adam started his... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am EDT
I2

9:00am EDT

How to Find The Real Need with Socratic Questioning (Kent McDonald, Heather Mylan-Mains)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
A common piece of advice is that your team should discover the true need of your project. Unfortunately advice on how to make that happen isn't as prevalent. In this session you'll have a chance to practice a simple technique to get to the core of what your stakeholders need that has been around for over 2000 years - Socratic questioning.
Join Kent McDonald as he walks you through a technique aimed at uncovering the (not intentionally) hidden need that your stakeholders are trying to satisfy, without asking "why?" five times in a row. Kent describes the questions, why they work and in what context they work based on his experience with IT organizations and the Agile Alliance. You'll then have a chance to practice them out to find out about a real project.
The line of questioning was inspired by Brennan Dunn who uses them to understand the true needs of his web development consultants.
Come learn about and practice this technique so you can use it back at the office to drive toward the right outcome.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn what socratic questioning is
  • Learn how to identify your stakeholders needs using socratic questioning
  • Practice socratic questioning with your peers
  • Determine when Socratic question is an appropriate technique to use

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Kent McDonald

Kent McDonald

Content Curator, Agile Alliance
Kent is a writer and product manager who helps product people deliver powerful internal products. He has IT and product development experience in a variety of industries including financial services, health insurance, nonprofit, and automotive. Kent practices his craft as content... Read More →
avatar for Heather Mylan-Mains

Heather Mylan-Mains

President, BAs Without Borders
I love thinking and discovering details through conversations that enable change for people, processes and businesses. I'm passionate about practicing the business analysis profession. I want to change the way we think and see what business analysis is and how we can be successful... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am EDT
H1

9:00am EDT

A Better, Faster Pipeline for Software Delivery (Gene Gotimer)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
The software delivery pipeline is the process of taking new or changed features from developers and getting them quickly delivered to the customers by getting the feature deployed into production. Testing within continuous delivery pipelines should be designed so the earliest tests are the quickest and easiest to run, giving developers the fastest feedback. Successive rounds of testing lead to increased confidence that the code is a viable candidate for production and that more expensive tests—be it time, effort, cost—are justified. Manual testing is performed toward the end of the pipeline, leaving computers to do as much work as possible before people get involved. Although it is tempting to arrange the delivery pipeline in phases (e.g., functional tests, then acceptance tests, then load and performance tests, then security tests), this can lead to serious problems progressing far down the pipeline before they are caught.
Be prepared to discuss your pipeline, automated or not, and talk about what you think is slowing you down and what is keeping you up at night. In this interactive workshop, we will discuss how to arrange your tests so each round provides just enough testing to give you confidence that the next set of tests is worth the investment. We'll explore how to get the right types of testing into your pipeline at the right points so that you can determine quickly which builds are viable candidates for production.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Each attendee should leave with a better understanding of their current and desired software delivery process.
  • The pipeline is about building confidence that the software is a viable candidate for production. Or realizing as early as you can that it isn’t.
  • Do just enough of each type of testing at each step in the delivery pipeline to determine if further testing is justified.
  • Different stages of the pipeline are for learning different things about your delivery process. Use them appropriately.
  • Do the most expensive tests last. Those are often the manual or subjective ones.
  • The pipeline offers a lot of opportunities to do tests that you might not have done if you had to set aside an explicit block of time to do them.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Gene Gotimer

Gene Gotimer

Senior Architect, Coveros, Inc.
Gene Gotimer is a senior architect at Coveros, Inc., a software company that uses agile methods to help customers build software better, faster, and more securely. They do this by focusing on agile development and DevOps practices such as continuous integration, repeatable builds... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am EDT
F4

9:00am EDT

I love the smell of DATA in the morning (Getting started with Agile Data Science) (Troy Magennis)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Data science improves effectiveness of many industries by looking at what has occurred in the past and using that analysis to help make decisions about the future. This talk shows practical techniques to solve questions about Agile processes and software development using even small amounts of historical data.
This session introduces the concepts behind data science and offers numerous easy wins with practical applications to any software development process. It will demonstrate how even a little data can be used to inform more likely future outcomes and how to get started immediately in your company.
Some of the practical techniques explained and demonstrated are –
  • How to estimate the likely lead time for future items based on (similar) past items using completed item cycle-time data trends
  • How to forecast how many items are likely to be delivered over some period of time using system throughput (just needing historical start and completion date data)
  • How to estimate the likely number of remaining defects in a product using sampling and defect report and fix rate data
  • How to look for clusters of similar impediments and failures in completed items using blocker clustering and frequency data
  • How to identify and quantify declining predictability in a process earlier by observing changing process trends
By the end of this session you will know how and why simple techniques applied to historical data are reliable and outperform intuition alone, and have immediately actionable techniques that you will understand. Everything shown is easily implemented using post-it notes and spreadsheets (yours or mine, freely available on Google sheets or Excel).
Learning outcomes include -
  • Learn what “data science” means and how it is used with simple examples
  • Learn how to immediately start doing simple analysis of historical data
  • Learn how to assess the expected reliability of analysis applied to historical data
  • Learn five immediate ways to perform quality data science in an Agile context
Data science isn’t as complicated as it sounds with the core concepts easily understood in a few minutes. Even if you hated mathematics in school, this session will make you love again.

Learning Outcomes:
  • What “data science” means and how it is used with simple examples
  • How to immediately start doing simple analysis of historical data
  • How to assess the expected reliability of analysis applied to historical data
  • Five immediate ways to perform quality data science in an Agile context

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Troy Magennis

Troy Magennis

President, Focused Objective
Troy is the founder and consultant for Focused Objective LLC the leading quantitative analysis and forecasting vendor for the software industry for the last five years. He regularly speaks at industry conferences and promotes the better use of historical data, metrics and quantitative techniques to anyone who listens. Troy has worked at all le... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am EDT
I1
  Enterprise Agile, Talk

9:00am EDT

Give Control, Create Leaders... teaching “bosses” to be leaders. (Adam Yuret)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Give Control, Create Leaders... teaching “bosses” to be leaders.
Some schools of Lean talk about “Leader Standard Work” but this term is often misunderstood to mean “Leader Standard Practices”. In order to effectively lead people we must know how to serve them. Agile has used the term “servant leader” for some time now, but if you understand real leadership you know that term is redundant.
Strategic leaders understand what the purpose of not only their own position is but the purpose of their organization. They understand what gets their employees out of bed and through the front door of the office every morning and works hard to support those people.
In this session we’re going to learn how to be an effective leader using “leader standard work” unlike any you’ve ever seen before. We’ll learn exactly what managers, directors and VPs in effective agile organizations do to help their reports, and how to adapt the work of David Marquet to software organizations.

Learning Outcomes:
  • During this session we'll learn how to effectively define standard work for leaders from managers all the way up the chain through appropriate abstraction to values.
  • Attendees will learn where to create effective boundaries to allow for emergence necessary within teams to be truly agile.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Adam Yuret

Adam Yuret

Founder/Consultant, Context Driven Agility
Adam Yuret is an experienced systems thinker who has consulted small non-profits and fortune 100 clients on adopting context-driven systems to solving difficult problems. Adam started Context Driven Agility in 2010 to share his passion for humanistic flow-based systems full time... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am EDT
I3

9:00am EDT

Hands-On Flow Metrics (Peter Kananen)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Delivering valuable software in an Agile project requires healthy flow. However, many experienced Agile teams don't quite understand the nuances of product development flow, and are left without clear answers to the question of why delivery is slower or more irregular than desired. The truth is that all software projects are subject to the mechanics of product development flow, and like the force of gravity, ignorance or denial is always a losing strategy.
In this hands-on session, you will learn about flow metrics by running experiments in a web-based tool, built by the presenter. The system demonstrates the effects of various flow variables on the productivity of a system. You'll get a visual picture of what happens to a process when there's too much work-in-progress, batch sizes are too large, queue times are too long, or a work center has a capacity problem. The experiments run by participants will be aggregated in the session and will be discussed so that trends can be identified and shared.
You'll walk away from the session with increased clarity into the principles of flow mechanics impacting your team's productivity. You'll also learn how to take tactical steps to improve your project by watching and managing flow.

Learning Outcomes:
  • The relationships between cycle time, queue time, batch size, and throughput
  • How to take specific actions to reduce cycle time and increase throughput
  • Articulate the risk of large batch sizes
  • Learn how to optimize flow by setting a utilization strategy for team members
  • Protect their teams from over-commitment by maximizing for throughput, not individual efficiency

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Peter Kananen

Peter Kananen

VP of Project Delivery, Gaslight
Peter Kananen is a Partner and Delivery Manager at Gaslight, an agile software development company that works with everyone from growing San Francisco startups and disruptive education companies to Fortune 500 giants like P&G and Omnicare. Peter spends his days tracking the happiness... Read More →



Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am EDT
H3

9:00am EDT

Think Big, Plan Small: How to Use Continual Planning (Johanna Rothman)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Many agile teams attempt to plan for an entire quarter at a time. Something changes—a better product opportunity, or a product development problem—and the quarter’s plan is not just at risk. That plan is now impossible. Instead of quarterly planning, consider continual planning. Continual planning allows a project or a program to use small deliverables to plan for the near future and replan often to deliver the most value.
While you may see benefits in your quarterly planning (working with each other, surfacing interdependencies, and the plan itself), you may find that your requirements change fast—even in the first two weeks. The quarterly plan is now at risk.
When the entire quarter’s plan is at risk, consider your options. You can’t bring everyone back together every two weeks or once a month to replan—that’s too expensive. Instead, create an environment of small continual planning. With continual planning, everyone can see the big picture roadmap and how the deliverables deliver that value. Teams are more likely to deliver small value which allows the planners to replan.
Just as we use cross-functional teams to deliver finished valuable product, we can use a cross-functional Product Owner Value Team (POVT) to use continual planning. The POVT contains these people:
  • The Product Managers, the people who develop and refine product strategy and product roadmaps, and
  • The Product Owners, the people who work with the teams to develop and refine product backlogs and stories.
With the help of agile roadmaps, the planners can think big and plan small, over and over again.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to create rolling wave, deliverable-based roadmaps
  • Who makes which kinds of decisions: introducing the PO Value Team and who might decide what and when.
  • How to use rolling wave deliverable-based planning to improve planning and delivery
  • What an MVP is and what an MVE is
  • Several questions to help POs think about how little to plan at any one time
  • Several questions to help POs think about how much value to expect
  • Questions about who the roadmap or backlog is for
  • Difference between continuous and continual planning

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Johanna Rothman

Johanna Rothman

President, Rothman Consulting
Johanna Rothman, known as the "Pragmatic Manager," provides frank advice for your tough problems. She helps leaders and teams see problems and resolve risks and manage their product development. Johanna was the Agile 2009 conference chair. Johanna is the author of several books... Read More →



Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am EDT
F1

9:45am EDT

The five mistakes I made when applying Agile and how you can learn from them. (Tiago Palhoto)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Come and see what were the biggest mistakes I made as a Scrum Master while applying Agile principles, their consequences and how I've overcome them! Short iterations by default, not breaking things small enough or lacking of project management are some of the topics covered. Come and learn how you can avoid them!

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • I've understood clearly that is not true that ALL iterations must be short. It all depends on the experience, of the team, client, complexity and size of the project. And whatever you do, don't pipeline your work! It will be so much worse;
  • Just because you may not need project managers, it doesn't mean you don't need project management! Make sure you keep performing those tasks, especially the ones related with radiating information to the stakeholders;
  • Learned how important is to break things small enough, both at story and task level. If you don't, you may be led to think that your iterations are too short, which will make you increase the size of the iteration and consequently, to aggravate your problem;
  • Learned that I need a solid Product Owner: Empowered, available and committed, aligned with the stakeholders. Anything less than that will put you into trouble. And never, but never try to replace your Product Owner by yourself, as you may end up making the wrong calls. this will led to lack of trust from the PO and the stakeholders;
  • Learned how really important is to keep consistent with the type of unit that you use in your estimates. If the team is estimating in ideal days, make sure you have their availability reflected in Ideal days. The same applies for calendar days. Mix them and you'll get into trouble very quickly (delays).

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Tiago Palhoto

Tiago Palhoto

Director, DO IT AGILE


Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:45am - 10:15am EDT
Wekiwa 1&2

10:45am EDT

Wellness and Agile Coaching: Why does this thing we love hurt so much? (Michael de la Maza)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Every agile coach I know has a wellness practice. Almost all of them have experienced extreme stress and emotional pain as a direct result of coaching. Why does this thing we love hurt so much?
In this workshop, we will share experiences and practices around wellness and agile coaching. We will work in small groups to create a pamphlet which captures what we have learned and, as an entire group, we will decide how to share it with others. To model a wellness practice, I will share and we will all practice the Kasperowski/McCarthy Friendship Protocol, a ten minute daily practice that fosters connection, empathy, and love.
I will kick start our conversation by showing the results of a survey I sent to the agile community in which over 50% of the respondents said they experience significant stress every week, over 65% said they have felt down or low for two or more weeks at a time, and over 55% said they have had physical symptoms due to stress. The survey showed that agile coaches use four key wellness practices -- meditation, exercise, nutrition, and sleep -- and I will share evidence-based information about the effectiveness of these popular practices.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Be aware of the wellness challenges faced by many agile coaches.
  • Be able to describe three wellness practices that other coaches have found supportive.
  • Know the steps of the Kasperowski/McCarthy Friendship Protocol.
  • Create a way to share wellness practices and experiences with other agile coaches.
  • Take a step towards establishing your own wellness practice.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Michael de la Maza

Michael de la Maza

MIT PhD | Co-founder, DemingWay.com
Michael de la Maza is the founder of Heart Healthy Scrum and a Scrum Alliance Certified Enterprise Coach (CEC). Previously, he was VP of Corporate Strategy at Softricity (acquired by Microsoft in 2006) and co-founder of Inquira (acquired by Oracle in 2011). He is the co-editor of... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
H3

10:45am EDT

High-performance Teams: Culture and Core Protocols (Richard Kasperowski)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Want awesome teams that build great products? Great teams don’t happen by accident. And they don’t have to take a long time to build.
In this session, we'll lay out the case for Continuous Teaming. Session participants will join in a flight of fun learning activity-sets. These will give you a taste of team awesomeness and how to start when you go back to work.
We'll build on the work of Jim and Michele McCarthy, Google, Bruce Tuckman, Gamasutra, Standish Group, Peter Drucker, and Melvin Conway. The learning activity-sets are short games, using elements from improvisational theater, The Core Protocols, Extreme Programming, and more.
Who should attend? Anyone who wants to create great teams and build great products. You’ll leave having embodied the essential elements of accelerated continuous team-building and awesomeness maintenance.
This session supports any number of participants. Participants will self-organize in small groups and experience the learning as we go.

Learning Outcomes:
  • An understanding of the research behind high-performance teams
  • Appreciation for the Core Protocols as one way to achieve high performance
  • Deep practical knowledge of the Core Protocols
  • The embodied knowledge for how to accelerate team formation for your team, from forming to high-performing
  • Happiness and fun at work
  • How to do this with your team today

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Richard Kasperowski

Richard Kasperowski

High-Performance Teams, With Great People
Richard Kasperowski is an author, teacher, speaker, and coach focused on high-performance teams. Richard is the author of the new book, High-Performance Teams: The Foundations, as well as The Core Protocols: A Guide to Greatness. He leads clients in building and maintaining high-performance... Read More →



Tuesday August 8, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
I1

10:45am EDT

The Product Organisation - The missing piece of the Agile jigsaw (Chris Matts, Tony Grout)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Have you seen these symptoms in your organisation? Do you have a piece of the Agile jigsaw that is missing?
  1. Teams and product owners being inundated with unreasonable levels of work.
  2. Some teams burning out because there aren't enough hours in the day whilst others are getting frustrated because they are waiting for them.
  3. Product owners being torn apart because the business sponsors cannot agree.
  4. Organisations that have huge inventory of software in progress but little being delivered.
  5. Executives with no clear view of what is happening across the organisation. Insights that come to late for them to act.
  6. Frustration that extra investment in capacity does not lead to extra output of value.
  7. Teams with nothing to do who invent cost saving busy work rather than look for disruptive innovations.
If so, come and learn how Skype used The Theory of Constraints to help two hundred product owners come together on a quarterly basis to create an organisation level backlog. The Skype Product Management Organisation discovered that the constraint that they needed to manage was the capacity of individual teams to deliver initiatives. Although the Skype team initially built a plan for the quarter, they soon discovered that the key was to manage capacity and limit work in progress. This approach lead to a sweet spot of long lived development teams that would self organise and reconfigure into a value stream in order to deliver value.
The session will consist of a fairly short experience report and a training exercise that everyone at Skype attended so that they knew how to get things done at Skype. This fun exercise involves stickies, chaos and the realisation of the real problem that needs to be solved when creating an Organisation Level Backlog. During the training, Tony and Chris will share anecdotes of the things they have seen along the way including a fifteen hundred percent increase in productivity at one client.
So if you are a product or delivery manager, executive or product manager/product owner, come along and find out how to fit the last Agile Jigsaw piece into your Agile Transformation. Understand why the only effective solution is a simple solution, and why complicated solutions will always fail. Understand why a Sweet Wild Assed Guess is better than story points when building a backlog for the next quarter.

Learning Outcomes:
  • *Understand the real constraint facing organisations implementing Agile (Team capacity, not Budget).
  • *Understand that the real challenge is to get the business to agree on the priority of what gets done first.
  • *Understand the two constraints necessary for product success (A strictly ordered backlog, and an estimate from each team affected by an initiative).
  • *Understand why limiting work in progress for each team is so important to the delivery capacity of the whole organisation.
  • *Understand that the portfolio level planning means creating a backlog rather than creating a plan.
  • *Understand that "Doing it" rather than "making stuff up" is of huge importance in areas where there are no established agile practices.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Tony Grout

Tony Grout

Atlassian
Hey, I would love to hear about how you're finding operating agility in large or fast growing organisations. Curious to hear what's not worked more so than what has and I'll share the same.
avatar for Chris Matts

Chris Matts

Left Back, Emergent Behaviour
Talk to me about creating a better workplace for our children.I co-created the GIVEN-WHEN-THEN format, discovered real options, staff liquidity (Skills Matrix), and Capacity Planning (Delivery Mapping).


Tuesday August 8, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
I2

10:45am EDT

Why and how we are moving beyond the Product Owner Mindset at Riot Games (Michael Robillard, Ahmed Sidky)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
At Riot Games our mission is to be the most player-focused game company in the world. That means we need to build fun, competitive, and engaging experiences for our players - everyday! In this journey we discovered that the product owner mindset and tools are insufficient. We needed to go beyond creating and managing backlogs to defining inspiring visions and creating bold strategies - still in an agile and flexible manner.
This shift requires a new mindset and a collection of effective yet lightweight tools and techniques. Our product leaders must ask different questions, discover deeper resonance, and provide strategic guidance that maintains the empowerment and autonomy of our programs and teams. As a result, we require a focus on the new world we aspire to create and the required impact, consistent terminology for often vague or overused strategic concepts; and we require the capability to identify and challenge the implicit assumptions in our strategic decision.
We will show how at Riot Games we have expanded on Jeff Patton's work on output/outcome/impact and combined it with Roger Martin's work on lightweight iterative strategy to drive our product organization forward. In addition, we are leveraging the validated learning approach from Lean Startup to minimize the risk of our strategic directions. We will discuss a critical inflection point where it is all too common to shift from outcome and impact back to output and why we believe this is inappropriate and how we keep it from happening at Riot. We will also include activities that will allow participants to experience the strategic thought process we are currently deploying across Product Management at Riot Games.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand how and why Riot differentiates between Output, Outcome, and Impact
  • Learn how and why to apply Product Management craft in an agile, complex, entertainment organization for creating, communicating, and de-risking strategy
  • Ability to describe a holistic system of building, validating, and aligning product strategy in an agile organization
  • Ability to apply Roger Martin's strategic framework of questions to whatever strategic process you use

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ahmed Sidky

Ahmed Sidky

Head of Business Agility, Riot Games
Ahmed Sidky, Ph.D. known as Doctor Agile, is a well-known thought-leader in the Agile community. He is currently the Director of Development Management for Riot Games and before that he was a transformation consultant for Fortune 100 companies. He is the co-author of Becoming Agile... Read More →



Tuesday August 8, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
H4

10:45am EDT

Changing the Mindset : A LEGO based Workshop on using TDD as a Problem Solving Technique (Deepak Kumar Gupta)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Test Driven Development or TDD is one of the most well known and used practice of eXtreme Programming (XP) family. As its widely known, TDD is all about writing test code before writing production code followed by re-factoring if required.
However, TDD is not just about writing unit test code to find coding bugs, but can also be used as a powerful technique of exploiting the problems for writing better code.
The proposed workshop intends to demonstrate how TDD can also be used as a powerful problem solving technique. This workshop is all about changing the mindset to consider TDD beyond unit tests.
The proposed workshop shall be done in the form of a "Innovation Games" exercise which provides a visual reference to problem solving technique(with and without TDD).
Workshop Modalities :
The workshop activities shall be done using "LEGO" and "Paper Drawings". Participants don't need to bring their laptops for the same.
People will have to work on activities in a team (4 - 8 person).
A brief coding session which will directly reflect the activities done with "LEGO" prior to that (Shall be done by presenter himself).
The tentative workshop outline is as proposed below
  • Learning : A background of eXtreme Programming : ~ 10 Minutes
  • Learning : TDD and a 4-Step guide of TDD : ~ 5 Mins
  • Workshop Activity : Solving a problem - Using non-TDD approach ~ 10 Minutes
  • Workshop Activity : Solving a problem - Using 4 Steps of TDD ~ 10 Minutes
  • Demonstration : (By Presenter) via online coding (both TDD and non-TDD ways) : Programming Language will be (Python / JavaScript) ~ 5 Minutes
  • Learning: Fakes, Mocks, Doubles, Stubs & Dummies ~ 20 Minutes
  • Workshop Activity : Using Fakes Vs Mocks ~ 10 Minutes
  • Q & A

Learning Outcomes:
  • - How to use TDD as a Problem Solving Technique
  • - Understand Unit Testing Paradigms
  • - Understand how to simulate external dependencies using Fakes, Mocks etc
  • - Where we shouldn't use TDD

Attachments:


Tuesday August 8, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
Wekiwa 7&8

10:45am EDT

developerGreatness++; (David Haney)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
There are many good developers in our industry, but few are truly great. Join a Stack Overflow Engineering Manager for a candid discussion of the journey to developer greatness. In this session we'll travel beyond code and commits into the realm of habits, core competencies, ego, ethics, and everything else that makes a developer great.

Learning Outcomes:
  • You'll learn best practices around ego, ethics, humility, and working with others. This talk will arm you with the knowledge required to develop skills that will make you into the best possible developer that you can become. Heavy focus on soft skills and interaction with others. Examples provided of behaviors that do and don't further your personal agenda and career growth.


Speakers
avatar for David Haney

David Haney

Engineering Manager, Stack Overflow
I work at Stack Overflow as an Engineering Manager. I'm a craft beer enthusiast and love supporting local breweries. I enjoy retro and modern video games and watching movies in old school one-screen theatres. I'm also a board game addict.


Tuesday August 8, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
F2

10:45am EDT

Advancing from global processes to a fit-for-purpose, human “SW development system” (Hendrik Esser, Jonas Wigander)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Processes and, generally, way of working approaches are usually optimized for one particular context. Having one company-wide way of working might help to keep a company aligned, but often causes severe local sub-optimization and frustration. So: should every sub-organization have their own processes, practices and ways of working?
At Ericsson, one of the world’s largest SW companies, operating in a rapidly changing highly complex environment, we must swiftly provide high quality solutions responding to our customer’s needs. This requires a good balance between a company-wide alignment and local optimization.
Then how can we practically achieve just-enough (global) alignment to enable (local) autonomy and optimization?
In this talk you will learn about the Ericsson Business Unit IT and Cloud’s journey from fixed static processes to – as we call it – our “SW Development System”.
You will learn about that SW Development System, which is based on insights from Agile, Lean, VUCA, Human System Dynamics and Applied Systems thinking: it is a human-centered, “just-enough” framework for working in an aligned way across a large organization where different parts contribute to a large product portfolio. It avoids the trap of forcing “mechanics” into the organization and yet allows us to work in an aligned and locally optimized way, helping us to collaborate and evolve across our large enterprise.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding of how to achieve a good balance between company-global alignment and local autonomy.
  • Learn about a Development System, that is based on the human interactions instead of process mechanics.


Speakers
avatar for Hendrik Esser

Hendrik Esser

Growing up in the 1980s I was a passionate computer game developer during my school and study times. After getting my diploma in Electrical engineering I started at Ericsson in 1994 as aSW developer. From 1996 I worked in project management roles. Since 2000 I am working as a manager... Read More →
avatar for Jonas Wigander

Jonas Wigander

Change Program Manager, Ericsson AB
Change management, large scale System and SW development, PLM for SW, Continuous Everything and DevOps, Agile and Lean.


Tuesday August 8, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
F1

10:45am EDT

Making 'agiLE' Work: Agile in the Large Enterprise (Candase Hokanson)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
As more large enterprises are adopting agile practices organization-wide, they face unique challenges when compared to smaller organizations or individual projects. While most agile approaches work well at the team level and even for small groups of teams, many of those same preferred practices just don’t work when scaled scaled to an entire organization. For example, with just one or a few agile teams, self- directing teams can organize how they want to solve problems, but when scaled to an entire organization, some level of consistency between teams is needed to manage the dependencies between them. Because of this, the teams can't be fully self-directed. Additionally, distributed teams are a reality in global enterprises, but most agile approaches prefer co-location for face to face conversations. Business stakeholders aren’t usually part of the decision to adopt agile, and as such, are resistant to participate, or are not trained on how to work with teams operating in an agile environment. Executives sometimes mandate the organization-wide move to agile, leaving managers to implement a methodology they might not believe in or aren’t trained to support. PMOs love gated approval processes and are hesitant to give them up, but they are still needed as key stakeholders on projects. Also, in most global organizations, funding isn’t allocated to projects in an agile manner, which means executives are asking for guarantees on the dollar that agile just doesn’t support. These are all challenges we've seen at our customers when scaling agile practices and while we don't have all the answers to these challenges, we do have suggestions for how we handled these situations at various times.
In this talk, we’ll (1) start by understanding the primary motivations for large global organizations to adopt agile practices followed by (2) an overview of different scaled approaches and their limitations when scaling and conclude with (3) the most common challenges our customers’ teams are up against, and suggestions to overcome those challenges.

Learning Outcomes:
  • 1) Understand why large enterprises want to adopt agile processes.
  • 2) Understand limitations of scaled approaches to operating in an agile environment.
  • 3) Discuss common challenges of agile in large enterprises, and how to overcome them.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Candase Hokanson

Candase Hokanson

Senior Product Manager, Seilevel
Candase Hokanson is a Senior Product Manager at Seilevel and a PMI-Agile Certified Practitioner who trains and Coaches, Product Owners, Scrum Masters, and business analysts on Agile approaches as well as championing products in those roles for clients. She works with teams to unite... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
Wekiwa 9&10

10:45am EDT

Facilitating Success Without Unicorns (Jason Kerney)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Facilitating Success Without Unicorns
The feeling of individual success is a crucial part of meaningful work and gives purpose. The feeling of purpose is crucial in retaining employee happiness. In software, purpose is fleeting. One task is finished and the next one starts. Yet a lot of what we do in Agile minimizes that feeling. Working collaboratively means focusing on the team’s successes and can bury individual contributions. Iterative cycles can lead to a constant feeling of never being done. The answer to this is to allow individuals to find meaningful goals and strive to complete them.
What if each person was given a facilitator that they trusted to guide them in finding personal goals?
It would take a particularly skilled facilitator to pull this together such that the employee felt helped and not put upon. That facilitator might as well be a unicorn because they are rare and hard to find.
I have experienced an employee-driven process of encouraged self-improvement. We got rid of the unicorn facilitator by allowing employees to choose facilitators from their peers. This allowed employees to directly control the process and find people they feel comfortable with that have no authority over them.
This talk is the story of how we discovered the employee-driven process to facilitate and help achieve individual successes. My current company enables employees to look inward to find what is meaningful to them while focusing on psychological safety, peer facilitation and real support.
Beyond explaining the process, I will examine the thoughts that helped develop it. I will explain why we do each of the things we do. My story is a practical account that gives attendees the knowledge they need to implement a system mimicking what we have, but with their own constraints. I hope attendees will leave with the framework to create a psychologically safe system that encourages individuals to set and strive toward their own, personal meaning of purpose.

Learning Outcomes:
  • What it means to have a process of enablement vs judgement.
  • Each person should leave with ideas about how to approach the people who work with them to create a process that encourages improvement.
  • Each person should have concrete examples of approaching review goals in a way that humanizes the process.
  • Each person should have an idea on how to facilitate a personal retrospective

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jason Kerney

Jason Kerney

Agile Technical Coach, Some Company
I am a programmer, coach, father, husband and friend. I care deeply about the industry of software development and the communities surrounding it. I love to play with programming languages, yet consider it the greatest accomplishment when we address the humanness that software ultimately... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
H1

10:45am EDT

Deliberate practice at the fluent edge: promoting goal-directed learning for Agile teams (Adam Light, Diana Larsen)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Professionals who make time for learning perform better than those who don't. And deliberate practice plays a key role in building advanced skills. Agile retrospectives help teams reflect on past performance to identify areas for improvement. But improving at the team level also requires shared practice.
Discover new ways to enable team learning in this fun workshop featuring the co-author of Agile Retrospectives and The Five Rules of Accelerated Learning. By engaging managers and sponsors to set a long-term capability goal and then setting short short-term practice goals at the team's fluent edge you can give retrospectives new life, deliver better outcomes, and sustain continuous improvement over time.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand an Agile team's journey through the four capability zones of the Agile Fluency™ Model
  • Work with managers and sponsors to identify a long-term capability goal for your team
  • Identify and describe a team's fluent edge with the aid of provided diagnostic questions
  • Incorporate new ideas and techniques to design a goal-directed retrospective

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Diana Larsen

Diana Larsen

Co-founder & Chief Connector, Agile Fluency Project, LLC
Diana Larsen is a co-founder, chief connector, and principal mentor at the Agile Fluency® Project. Diana co-authored the books Agile Retrospectives: Making Good Teams Great; Liftoff: Start and Sustain Successful Agile Teams; Five Rules for Accelerated Learning. She co-originated... Read More →
avatar for Adam Light

Adam Light

Founder, Agile Fluency Project
Adam Light helps technology leaders use Lean and Agile methods to deliver results and build innovative high-performing organizations. As a consultant to enterprise clients, Adam focuses on pragmatic techniques that increase organizational capacity by improving leadership capability... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
I3

11:30am EDT

Impostor Syndrome: The Flip Side of the Dunning-Kruger Effect (Salvatore Falco)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
In their 1999 paper, "Unskilled and Unaware of It," psychologists David Dunning and Justin Kruger described a phenomenon in which people who lack competence in a domain will nevertheless rate themselves as highly skilled. The phenomenon became known as "the Dunning-Kruger Effect," and most commentary has focused on the inability to recognize incompetence. But Dunning and Kruger also described an inversion of that pattern. Often, highly skilled people will underestimate their ability. In extreme cases, this manifests as "impostor syndrome."
For years, I was among the latter group. In spite of positive feedback from peers and supervisors, I discounted my skill as a Scrum Master. My teams thrived, but I focused on my perceived deficiencies, and constantly feared being exposed as a fraud. In this Experience Report, I will discuss how I came to recognize the problem, and how I learned to accurately assess my abilities.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • • How to solicit valuable feedback
  • • How to listen to, evaluate, and use unsolicited feedback
  • • Building and engaging in a healthy feedback community
  • • How I channeled my over-active inner critic into a constructive feedback mechanism.

Attachments:

Speakers

Tuesday August 8, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm EDT
Wekiwa 1&2

2:00pm EDT

Bridging Mindsets: Creating the PMI Agile Practice Guide (Mike Griffiths, Johanna Rothman)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
At first glance, the PMI appears a strange partner to work with to create an Agile Practice Guide. Many people see PMI as the source of the plan-driven, big-design-up-front, waterfall-inspired methodology that agile approaches are rebelling against. In truth, the PMI is the source of commonly regarded good practices, which today includes agile approaches.
Since many PMI members were engaged in agile projects and looking for guidance, they turned to the agile community and a partnership with the Agile Alliance was forged to create the new Agile Practice Guide. This experience report describes the recruitment of 7 authors, team formation and development of the new guide since August 2016.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Gaining consensus with experts with differing strongly-held opinions is never easy. It is even harder when everyone is an unpaid volunteer who is also geographically dispersed and time-shifted. Luckily we quickly established some team norms and cadences that for the most part worked for everyone.
  • The next challenge was corralling a group of agile evangelists to work to a largely waterfall plan and heavily front-loaded production timetable. After much squirming by both groups, a hybrid approach was developed that allowed for iterative, incremental development of the first draft of the guide. It also largely satisfied the PMI’s production schedule and review gates. The experience report shares what compromises were made and the hybrid solution.
  • The content and writing styles recommended by the agile authors fundamentally differed from the standards guidelines used by the PMI. We wanted to use a direct, personal writing style using language such as “You may want to consider using X…” but this was contrary to the third person directive style favored by the PMI for its standards.
  • This is a reflection of the PMI’s background being in project environments that can be defined upfront and have a focus on process. In contrast, agile approaches assume more uncertainty and focus more on the people aspects. Fortunately, we prevailed here too and would like to share our struggles and solutions for anyone else who faces conforming to traditional standards.


Speakers
avatar for Johanna Rothman

Johanna Rothman

President, Rothman Consulting
Johanna Rothman, known as the "Pragmatic Manager," provides frank advice for your tough problems. She helps leaders and teams see problems and resolve risks and manage their product development. Johanna was the Agile 2009 conference chair. Johanna is the author of several books... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm EDT
Wekiwa 1&2

2:00pm EDT

Shu Ha Ri: Creating Your Coaching Journey (Bernie Maloney)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Tired of learning your Coaching craft by trial and luck? Many of us begin and emerge as coaches through kismet and fortune, rather than with clear goals for learning and acceptance criteria for progressing in the craft. Instead, why not apply Agile techniques and use Inspect and Adapt to groom a path to guide your learning as an Agile Coach?
In this interactive session, you won’t merely sit and listen; you’ll learn both WITH and FROM other participants. We’ll start by building a learning ‘backlog’ for coaches. Through 3 brief scenarios of increasing complexity, self-organized table-teams will examine what a coach would need to learn in order to be prepared to thrive in that stage. With each scenario, we’ll hold a group ‘demo’ of the topics, techniques, skills and resources for a coach’s learning at that stage.
Coaches already handling one to several teams are the primary audience for this session. Still, the learning and career development situations identified through this session will be as valuable to Aspiring Coaches and Managers of Coaches. Even a few seasoned Coaches may appreciate learning through an exposure to “beginner’s mind” in this workshop.
Would you plan an iteration without a backlog? Stop leaving your development as a Coach up to luck. Come create a skills backlog and identify goals for the next lessons on Your Coaching Journey.

Learning Outcomes:
  • recognize and describe 3 common stages of learning for a coach
  • describe skills, knowledge and resources helpful for a coach to thrive at each stage
  • identify the next lessons you want to learn in improving as an Agile Coach
  • create a peer / coaching circle to support and apply their ongoing learning

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Bernie Maloney

Bernie Maloney

Agile Coach | Accelerating Genius, Persistent Systems
Bernie’s career started with a flash and a bang. Literally. His first position was designing devices that protect telephone networks from lightning strikes. A few career pivots later, he had a flash of insight: it was possible to tap into latent potential in every person, every... Read More →



Tuesday August 8, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
F2

2:00pm EDT

Which Development Metrics Should I Watch? (Gene Gotimer)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
W. Edwards Deming noted that “people with targets and jobs dependent upon meeting them will probably meet the targets – even if they have to destroy the enterprise to do it.” While metrics can be a great tool for evaluating performance and software quality, becoming beholden to reaching metrics goals, especially the wrong ones, can be detrimental to the project. Each team needs to take care and understand what targets are appropriate for their project. They also need to consider the current and desired states of the source code and product and the capabilities and constraints of the team.
As one of the lead architects working with a huge codebase on a government project, I often have the opportunity to influence the teams around me into watching or ignoring various metrics. I will walk through some measures that are available to most projects and discuss what they really mean, various misconceptions about their meaning, the tools that can be used to collect them, and how you can use them to help your team. I’ll discuss experiences and lessons learned (often the hard way) about using the wrong metrics and the damage they can do.
This session is aimed at development leads and others that are trying to choose the right metrics to measure or trying to influence what metrics to avoid.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Code coverage doesn’t tell you what is tested; it shows you what isn’t.
  • Mutation testing can be extremely valuable as a metric and as a learning tool.
  • Watching trends of metrics can be much more useful than aiming for specific values.
  • That said, zero failing unit tests and no known security issues can be universal goals.
  • Cutting corners doesn’t always make you faster, even in the near-term.
  • Ultimately, escaped defects is the most important metric to measure.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Gene Gotimer

Gene Gotimer

Senior Architect, Coveros, Inc.
Gene Gotimer is a senior architect at Coveros, Inc., a software company that uses agile methods to help customers build software better, faster, and more securely. They do this by focusing on agile development and DevOps practices such as continuous integration, repeatable builds... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
Wekiwa 7&8

2:00pm EDT

Permission, Trust, and Safety (Ashley Johnson, Tim Ottinger)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
"Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done." Easy to say, but how is it done?
Do people in your organization feel permission to bring their best?
Do they trust the organization?
How much energy do people spend protecting themselves from each other?
Who or what stops you and your team from doing your best work?
As coaches, we find that most people live well beneath opportunities available to them. They feel limited, over-managed, and afraid to ask for the things they need. They "play it safe" and "cover their butts" to avoid accusation, blame, or reprisal.
Join us and explore how leaders and managers can help establish an environment where people can accomplish great things.

Learning Outcomes:
  • This is an exploration of the topics of safety, trust, and permission: “It’s not a workshop if you know how it will end.”
  • Safety and trust as prerequisites to being agile.
  • Situations where self-organization breaks down.
  • Three levels of permission, and how to grant and acquire permission.
  • How to intentionally create trust and safety.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ashley Johnson

Ashley Johnson

Anzeneer, Industrial Logic
Leadership and Self-Deception Patterns of Organizational Design for Failure Cargo Cults - Pretending Progress while Minimizing Results. Unlicensed Organizational Psychotherapy Open Source Ecology Modern Agile
avatar for Tim Ottinger

Tim Ottinger

Anzeneer, Industrial Logic
Tim is a long-time programmer (since 1979), reviewer, speaker, writer. He has been active in many of the big changes in software over the past 36 years (including Design Patterns, Object-Oriented Design, and Agile software development). In addition to his contributions in "Clean... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
I2

2:00pm EDT

CANCELLED: Adaptive Learning: Leveraging Action Learning to Realize Holistic Org. Agility (Michael Hamman)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
In the late 1980s and early 90s, Peter Senge taught the world about 'organizational learning', and of the great benefits it can bring to organizations across all industries. At no time is the capacity for genuine organizational learning more critical than it is in the face of the complexity, rapid change and unpredictability businesses and other organizations currently face. But in order to truly leverage organizational learning as an adaptive capability, we must distinguish learning that merely helps human systems (individuals, teams, organizations) get better at what they are already doing, from learning that helps human systems transform the very beliefs and assumptions that fundamentally determine how they perform in the first place.
Action Learning is an oldie but goody from the world of organization development. It helps organizational players learn through action. In this session, I will teach you how I have used action learning as a key tool to help agile strategists (leaders, managers, agile coaches) create conditions that enable emergent adaptive agile capability across an organization.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn the difference between single-loop and double-loop learning, and why the latter is such an important organizational skill to develop, if what you are going for is deep, agile transformation
  • Learn how Integral thinking can enhance our ability to see the behaviors and effects of an organization more holistically and systemically
  • Learn the basic technique of action learning
  • Learn how you might deploy action learning in your organization as a way to emergently leverage, and grow upon, innate organizational wisdom and intelligence


Speakers
avatar for Michael Hamman

Michael Hamman

Founder, Evolvagility


Tuesday August 8, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
Wekiwa 9&10

2:00pm EDT

Kickstart Your Agile Transformation with a Videoscribe (Laurens Bonnema, Evelien Roos)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Are you struggling to convince people in your organization to really adopt an agile approach? Trying to get managers to agree to changes in procedure that will help the teams you are working with? Tired of doing that in endless meetings, presentations, and training sessions? So were we! Until we tried something else and doodled the change. Then, we animated our doodles and published them as a videoscribe. The results were amazing! For some reason, our hand-drawn animated videos touched people deeper than we'd been able to before. And change came faster after that. We were able to accelerate the agile transformation, and scale it from one business unit to the entire organization by leveraging the power of video. Want to learn how? Come to our session, and we'll teach you how to draw, animate your drawings, and publish them with a nice voice-over so you can add visual flavor to your agile approach when you get back to work.
Can't draw? Don't worry, we can't either. We'll show you how to do it anyway, then teach you how to animate it and add a voice-over. Some knowledge of agile principles and practices is helpful, as we'll be using real-life examples from our agile coaching and training.

Learning Outcomes:
  • You'll walk out of this session with the knowledge to create your own hand-drawn visuals and animate them with voice-over.
  • We'll share our 7-step plan to successful videoscribing that you can use to add visual flavor to your agile approach, and in the process have deep conversations on the real issues the organization is facing and how best to solve them using an agile approach.
  • We'll show you alternatives to the tools we use, including a fully analogue way with kit you most likely have already so you can get started right away.
  • You'll have an extra tool in your toolkit to help you engage and communicate effectively with a large audience to kickstart (or reboot) your agile transformation.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Laurens Bonnema

Laurens Bonnema

Agile Management Consultant, Xebia
Agile Management Consultant and Graphic Facilitator. Mentor to managers creating Agile organizations. I make boring business notes fun!


Tuesday August 8, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
H2

2:00pm EDT

Solving the PMO Paradox (Jesse Fewell, Kim Brainard)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
For many organizations, the Project/Program Management Office (PMO) is a very large rock on the road to agility. On one hand, the PMO in many organizations is the primary advocate of a centralized uniform process-oriented mindset approach to work. On the other hand, the same group often wields both an interest in agile methods and the organizational influence to push it forward. Meanwhile, many agile advocates speak of humanized work and then ironically delight in the failure and frustration of PMO co-workers.
What do we do? Can our advocacy for people over process also reach the people who advocate for process? How do we move from good guys / bad guys to holistic transformation?
In this exploratory workshop, we will address these questions head-on through collaborative dialog. Come with your experiences, and suggestions for involving, transforming, or circumventing the PMO to become more Agile, and we will all leave with insights and actions we can really use.

Learning Outcomes:
  • What are the assumptions that agilists and PMO staff make of each other
  • What are successful approaches for addressing the PMO in an agile environment?
  • What are steps one can take to move forward


Speakers
avatar for Kim Brainard

Kim Brainard

Co-CEO, Radtac U.S.
I LOVE people and enjoy creating positive change in their professional and personal lives. Coaching others to realize their potential and setting them up to achieve results is a win for everyone. Having the opportunity to train and teach others to learn is a gift and inspires me each... Read More →
avatar for Jesse Fewell

Jesse Fewell

Agile Coach & Trainer, JesseFewell.com
Jesse Fewell is a writer, coach, and trainer in the world of management and innovation. From Boston to Bangalore, he's helped startups and conglomerates alike catapult to breakthrough results. His adventures are written down in "Can You Hear Me Now", his handbook for remote teams... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
H1

2:45pm EDT

The Thrill is Gone - How to Bring it Back Again (Customers and Trust) (Meg Ward)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
The Thrill Is Gone
Remember those heady days when it seemed like you and your customer walked hand in hand through a field of flowers with everything going right in the world? Maybe you've never had those heady days. Maybe you had them, and then the dark storm clouds of failed deliveries, disagreements on appropriate technology, competitive pressures shrinking your deadlines, etc. have left you and your team feeling that it's you against the world and your relationship with your customer will never be the same again.
I've been there, and I'm here to help. In February 2016, I moved from Developer to Manager of a team who were in their fifth year of a two-year project. To make matters worse, they had another deployment of an equally complex product that needed to happen nearly immediately due to competitive pressures (spoiler alert: we did not hit the deadline the customer wanted).
In this talk, I'll cover tips and tricks to build transparency, and with that transparency, build trust as well as about how to overcome a legacy of distrust and build stronger relationships.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Identifying where the trust has fallen short
  • Tools to increase transparency - delivery cadence, emails, meetings, showcases, etc.
  • How to talk to your customers about potential failures

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Meg Ward

Meg Ward

Associate Director, Development, IHS Markit
I'm a software professional with 17 years in the industry currently managing a team that fluctuates between 12 and 15 people working on a C#/SQL desktop app for the oil and gas industry. In my spare time, I play roller derby, brew beer, and read voraciously (mostly science fiction... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 2:45pm - 3:15pm EDT
Wekiwa 1&2

3:45pm EDT

CANCELLED: Can a dancing elephant be Agile? - The IBM Agile transformation story! (Phil Abernathy)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
This is the story of how IBM, a 110 year old company with 400,000 people globally, is once again innovating and transforming itself, to keep up with the pace of change, to an Agile way of working.
Why should a large, $80billion dollar global corporation change to Agile? Why did IBM choose Agile? Why not some of the other options like Lean or Lean Six-Sigma and where does Customer focused design fit in?
This is the story of how a 400,000 person company has been transforming itself to an Agile organisation inside out, right across the entire Group including IT, HR, Finance, Marketing, Operations, Product development and Manufacturing. The scale and scope spans technologies from mainframe, to the Cloud, Watson and Cognitive computing to Blockchain and even on to research in areas such as Quantum Computing.
We will outline where we started, what we did and how we went about scaling Agile across such a huge global organisation.
We share our problems and pain, the pitfalls we wish we could have avoided and the successes we have experienced from day one. Now more than two years into the journey the benefits are so astounding that we have even commercialized the approach at the demand of our customers.
We will show you how we need to restructure the core of the organisation, reduce and flatten the leadership and management layers, assess and selected only the best ‘Agile minded’ leaders, trained and coached thousands of people and all this while keeping the organisation and our clients running at full tilt.
We share how we saved hundreds of millions while improving response and cycle times by multiple factors, saw our employee engagement soar and our customer satisfaction rating increase significantly.
Agile is traditionally seen as just a way to do things faster and better, but often not as a method to reduce cost and increase revenue. We will show you how Agile has contributed significantly to these two key business drivers.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Why choose Agile and what are the options
  • How to strategically position Agile at C-suite and board level
  • How to start a large Agile organisational transformation
  • What to do and not to do on the journey of transformation
  • What are the key change resistance tactics you will see and how to best handle them
  • How do you change the organisation structure and leadership culture of a existing organisation
  • How do you turn the ship, how do you make elephants move like a pod of dolphins, where do you start and what are the steps to take.
  • How do you train and coach thousands of people to a new way of working
  • How do you measure success of such transformation
  • How do you mange such a large organisational transformation


Speakers

Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 4:15pm EDT
Wekiwa 1&2

3:45pm EDT

The SDLC - Changing the World of Work to Create Business Agility (Matt Anderson, Stephen Denning)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
In the VUCA world, only those businesses that can truly act with agility will be able to capitalize on new opportunities at the speeds and in the delivery models that the consumer demands. Regardless of the business vertical, agility is key. "Business Agility" itself is extremely elusive as consumers' demands regularly outpace a business' ability to deliver.
While a great Software Development Life Cycle helps enable agility, it will not get you business agility. The Steve Denning Learning Consortium on the other hand, is a community of several companies practicing agile across their organizations that have joined together to share best practices and drive learning at scale to create business agility models to share back to the agile community.
Microsoft, Spotify, Cerner, Ericsson, Barclays Bank, CH Robinson, and Riot Games have all presented their individual stories at Agile conferences globally. They have now joined forces to learn from each other under the leadership of Forbes contributor and author Steve Denning. Through a series of site visits, deep dive focus topics and free form discussions over the past 2+ years, the SDLC has uncovered several patterns that can help you on your journey to business agility and hold the promise to change the world of work.
The patterns are not unique to IT and are being successfully applied in HR, Support, Business Development and other business departments.
Key patterns include:
  • Nurturing Culture
  • Delighting Customers
  • Descaling Work
  • Enterprise-wide Agility
Join Steve Denning, Matt Anderson (Cerner), and Ahmed Sidky (Riot Games) to discuss how you can enable business agility in your organization.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will learn how to adopt and scale various business agility practices that the SDLC members have identified as common practices. This includes organization-wide agility spanning beyond IT in areas like HR, Support, and Business Development.
  • Four main topics/patterns were presented at The Drucker Forum as part of the official findings, but the discussion will allow for audience questions to address their specific concerns/challenges.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Steve Denning

Steve Denning

Founder, Steve Denning LLC
Steve Denning is the warren Buffett of business communication. He sees things others don’t and is able to explain them so the rest of us can understand. Chip Heath, author of Made to Stick. Steve Denning is a master storyteller, leadership expert and best... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
F1

3:45pm EDT

Mindful Agile: Listen like Buddha, build leaders like a 'BOSS' (Todd Wilson, John Nicol)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
The measure of a successful leader is not in the number of followers they have, rather it's how many leaders they have been able to develop. We know from Sir Richard Branson, Eileen Fisher and other inspirational leaders that their success is partially attributed to their capacity for mindful listening. Through observation over the past 20 years we know that our ability to transform a company is directly correlated to our ability to harness transparency and openness. To do this we need to develop great listening skills throughout the organization. This workshop has been designed to awaken your sense of listening with concrete patterns and practices. We cut through the phenomena of listening and teach you how to observe it in real-time. We will show you how to enter into a state of flow thereby slowing down the conversation with your own mind. When mastered you develop a true superpower.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate your ability to identify and practice 4 levels of listening: Downloading, Factual, Empathic, Generative. We will also demonstrate patterns that you can continue to use at work or in life to grow your capacity to listen.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for John Nicol

John Nicol

Co-Founder & Enterprise Transformation Coach, Mindful Agile
John is an Enterprise Agile Coach with experience in large scale agile transformations. John consults to business and technology leaders and has done so for medium to Fortune 50 size companies including Century Link, Comcast, AT&T, USAA, OppenheimerFunds, MassMutual, PayPal, Prudential... Read More →
avatar for Todd Wilson

Todd Wilson

Co-Founder - Enterprise Transformation Coach, Mindful Agile
Todd is an Enterprise Transformation Coach and co-founder of Mindful Agile. He has coached technology leadership at Fortune 500 companies including General Electric, Capital One, PayPal and Prudential. Todd's expertise spans across lean and agile practices as well as organizational... Read More →



Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
H3

3:45pm EDT

Double Aces: Positive Psychology Research that Solves Problems and Boosts Team Performance (Pete Oliver-Krueger)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Have you ever been stuck in an argument without end? Do you wish you could say no to your boss? Want to avoid a fight with your significant other, family member, or friend? Do you live in America (or Europe or anywhere on Earth) and don't understand why the “other side” doesn't see the world the way you do?
Often the way you present your ideas has more impact on success than the actual merit of your ideas. This session is ideal for managers and coaches, but also equally accessible to anyone who's ever been in an argument, at work or at home. This session is about how to have difficult conversations that are productive rather than destructive.
You will learn how to structure your important conversations for success. We will also cover how to work with someone when you don't agree. And for your Agile projects, we'll show how to use these techniques to lead Requirements Planning sessions and facilitate effective Sprint Retrospectives.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to structure conversations for success.
  • Understand others and be understood, even if you don't agree
  • Sort project requirements into logical, actionable project plans
  • Learn how the order in which you talk can completely change any conversation.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Pete Oliver-Krueger

Pete Oliver-Krueger

Agile People Engineer, Lithespeed
Helping develop people who develop great products, thru Positive Psychology, Teal, Agile, and Lean Startup practices that help organizations transform into places where people want to work, and where they’re building interesting things that they can be proud of.


Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
I2

3:45pm EDT

Missing the point with Backlog Item Estimation (Chris Li)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Have you experienced a lot of energy and time spent with your teams centered around estimation? Do you feel that everyone isn't quite on the same page? There are a number of challenges on teams who wish to work with an agile mindset, and negative patterns around estimation can have quite the impact on productivity and team morale.
In this workshop, participants will revisit what a Product Backlog Item represents as well as exactly what an estimate represents. Using this as a foundation, session participants will learn about four distinct parts of a pattern that repeats itself in organizations who may not have a strong handle on these concepts. The workshop concludes with participants participating in a lightweight estimation exercise that they can then take back to their organization.
Having a better understanding of estimation is helpful, and combined with a simple yet powerful game to compare items relatively to one another will help break your teams of the pattern of misunderstanding the point of backlog item estimation.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Revisit the fundamental concepts of Product Backlog Items and Estimates
  • Share past experience of estimation activities with other participants
  • Explore the pattern of misunderstanding around backlog item estimation
  • Learn to facilitate a lightweight and collaborative estimation exercise

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Chris Li

Chris Li

Founder, SparkPlug Agility LLC
I am a passionate and energetic Certified Scrum Trainer and Enterprise Agile Coach who is always interested in meeting new people and picking up new skills. I enjoy talking about topics around agile training, coaching, and consulting as well as designing courses and public speak... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
I1

3:45pm EDT

Abuser Stories: Think Like the Bad Guy and Pull Security Forward (Judy Neher)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
User stories are a generally accepted scrum and extreme programming practice that helps us capture user valued wants, needs and desires. All too often, we spend so much time worrying about those new features, that we put off thinking about the security of our system. Introducing Abuser Stories: abuser stories help us to see our system from the perspective of an attacker, allowing us to see where potential vulnerabilities have been introduced into our system.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How seemingly benign functional user stories can create vulnerabilities in our software, leaving lots of opportunity for our enemies to take advantage of our weaknesses.
  • How to use the concept of abuser stories to shed some light on where these vulnerabilities can be introduced.
  • How to craft a good abuser story.
  • How to craft refutation criteria so that we can determine that the attack depicted by the abuser story is not possible.
  • How to estimate and rank abuser stories.


Speakers
avatar for Judy Neher

Judy Neher

President/CEO, Celerity Technical Services, Inc.
Passionate about building highly collaborative, high performing teams.


Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
F2

3:45pm EDT

Scaling Such Great Heights: Salesforce's 11 Year Agile Story (Tamsen Mitchell)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
A Catastrophic Fail?... YES!

Was it Humiliating?... Very

Did we FAIL?....Hell Yeah!!...
...But NOW, Salesforce has one of the most well-known Agile transformation stories. Customers are constantly asking for the recipe to our secret sauce. How did we scale to over 400 teams and 45 business units, across a global Technology and Products organization? "We want THAT!"
I'll speak candidly about what went wrong, what went right, and key things we consider critical to making it work. (HINT: It came with a lot of inspection and adaption.)
This workshop will provide insights into our process, the keys to creating and maintaining our Agile organization, and the culture that is the foundation of our agility.
We'll shine a light on the parts of our process that have been influenced by the flavors of SAFe, Scrum@Scale and LeSS. Then, we'll talk about what we've been doing in the past few years, around systems thinking, organizational development, spiral dynamics and integral agile theory. Lastly, I'll share our aspirations for where we want to take our scaled agile practice and how our coaching team supports our company's goals.
One size does not fit all. A best practice implies there is 1 way, and it doesn't get better. Unless you are Spotify, you can't match what Spotify has done. Each company must find their own way, but you can learn from the journeys of others.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Steal the recipe for our secret sauce
  • Explain failures and successes of frameworks based on our experience
  • Understand the current models we use in our scaled model
  • Learn the 4 main things we find critical in our scaling story

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Tamsen Mitchell

Tamsen Mitchell

Agile Coach, Graphic Language
It all started when... Tamsen found her passion in cognitive neuroscience and humor. No, really. Graphic Language grew out of a passion for visuals, coaching and humor. It was founded by Tamsen Mitchell after years of research into what makes information compelling and memorable... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
H2

3:45pm EDT

Leading From Within an Agile Team (Selena Delesie)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
The deeper roots that enable Agile organizations to flourish has been lost by many. Teams that struggle do so for many reasons… leaving people frustrated, complacent, and content to exist in mediocrity. There's a little secret, one that propels teams, and entire organizations, to be really successful. It’s a matter of leadership. Not just executives, managers, or those with leader titles get to lead - everyone does!
In this interactive workshop, we explore the value and purpose of specific agile practices. Next we investigate specific leadership behaviours that make a big impact in any team, by any team member. We then examine what these behaviours look like within the agile practices to understand how to lead from within a team. Participants leave with practical insights and actions to instantly improve their team and performance.
The truth is that full benefits of Agile emerge when every person embraces their personal leadership. By embracing our inner leader, we are able to engage our team, improve value and quality delivery, and gain the competitive edge Agile methods intended.

Learning Outcomes:
  • The new paradigm of individual and team leadership
  • How specific Agile practices are failing and why
  • Specific approaches to take practices from lacklustre to purposeful
  • What leadership behaviours look like for different Agile practices
  • How to lead from within an Agile team to improve team satisfaction, success, and gain a competitive edge

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Selena Delesie

Selena Delesie

Leadership Coach & Speaker, Delesie Solutions Inc.
Selena Delesie is a leadership and transformation coach, speaker, and author. She is a trusted guide for leaders who seek to improve their business and their life—from the heart. Selena blends sixteen years of experience in the technology industry with a broad range of studies... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
I3

3:45pm EDT

Organizational Neurobiology and Fitness (Olaf Lewitz, Christine Neidhardt)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Come and join us: we will explore new ideas with holistic learning methods to inspire organizational learning with recent findings from neurobiological research.
When humans want to improve their well-being and health, we exercise, meditate, choose a good diet … Why don’t we improve organizations in similar ways? And what would that look like?
New organizational development methods see organizations as living beings, organisms. Organizations show patterns of stress, trauma, addiction like human beings. We know from neurobiological research how integration helps the brain to heal - what would mental integration look like in organizations?
Learning requires integration too: insights and models from different domains, diverse knowledge and experience from different minds at the table. In this session you’ll experience how this integration can happen effectively, and with a lot of fun. We will facilitate deep exchange and produce inspiring results - all of us will learn in this session!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Practice Awareness Maps: a group learning method that highlights diversity, stimulates insights and is broadly applicable at work
  • Determine ways to apply Dan Siegel’s integration model to inspire learning in your organization
  • Increase your awareness around similarities between organizational approaches and the organizing principles of organisms
  • Share your inspirations of new ideas and tools you can take back into your organization

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Olaf Lewitz

Olaf Lewitz

Trust Artist, TrustTemenos Academy
Olaf Lewitz loves his life and his work. He helps all with the art to love like that; an art that requires and fosters trust. He's the trust artist. Will stay when needed and leave when wanted.


Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
H4

3:45pm EDT

Delivering Compelling Products through Progressive Portfolio Refinement (Jorgen Hesselberg)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
At Intel, we are faced with some hairy challenges: how do we create a clear line of sight from the highest levels of strategic vision to a concrete expression of a feature? How do we effectively prioritize work across the portfolio so we can allocate resources appropriately? And how do we make the voice of the customer come alive in the backlog to deliver more compelling products?
Our approach has been to progressively refine strategic value through a set of interactive, light-weight workshops translating executive intent into concrete work. By including a cross-functional set of executives at the start, defining an economic framework, identifying the job to be done and facilitating more conversations and interactions at different levels of the organization, we've been able to spend less time on non-value added activities and more time on product development. Along the way, we were able to reduce organizational WIP, understand what's really important to our business and ultimately create a more engaged organization.
This talk takes you through a step-by-step overview of how we got to where we are now. We'll illustrate the problems we were faced with, show how progressive refinement across our portfolio helped us solve them and demonstrate the benefits we gained as a result. We'll also be transparent about our challenges and show you some of the efforts that didn't work.
At the end of this talk, you'll be familiar with a set of tools and practices that will help your organization align strategy with execution. You'll do more of the things that matter and less of the things that don't. Albeit not a silver bullet, an intentional approach to progressive portfolio refinement supports business agility across the enterprise.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - Learn how a Fortune 500 company created end-to-end visibility of value delivery, from concept-to-cash
  • - Understand how we defined an economic framework from which to make trade-offs
  • - Recognizing that involvement and collaboration from all groups is necessary to create end value, including Sales, Marketing, Operations, Finance and Support
  • - See how we created frequent feedback loops to generate inspect & adapt opportunities
  • - Be relentless regarding removing waste so we can spend less time on non-value added activities, more time on product development

Attachments:


Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
I4

3:45pm EDT

One Metric to Rule Them All: Effectively Measure Your Teams Without Subjugating Them (Cheryl Hammond)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
If you don't know how to measure what you want, you'll end up wanting what you can measure. Most often the thing you want to know isn't easily quantifiable, and common proxy metrics are usually poorly correlated with the information you actually need. Measuring the wrong things is worse than nothing—a toxic metric can damage your teams' performance.
With the right data, you can change the conversation. Tell your team's authentic story to management, your customers, and beyond. Step away from dangerous metrics that punish unfairly. Quit wasting time with metrics that are easily gamed. Instead, choose effective metrics to get everyone on the same page about what's important.
Whether you're the measurer or the measuree, in this session, you'll learn not just which metrics work, but why and how. Our examples will focus mainly on team, project, and program metrics, with theoretical guidance to inform all kinds of measures including portfolio and organization. Understand the difference between true metrics and proxy metrics, and good proxies and evil ones. Discover a framework for evaluating any metric, a Hall of Shame covering some of the worst most popular benchmarks, and one true guide to point you to the very best metrics of all. See some great examples of visualization that make metrics sing, and leave with several concrete measures you can begin tracking as soon as you get back to your desk.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Difference between true and proxy metrics
  • Characteristics of good metrics
  • Examples of common bad metrics and why you should stop using them
  • Great metrics, including counterintuitive ones, that correlate to the performance you want to influence
  • Some examples of measurements where qualitative, not quantitative, works best

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Cheryl Hammond

Cheryl Hammond

Delivery Lead, Agile Practice Leadership Enablement, Pivotal
Cheryl Hammond, a.k.a. bsktcase, has a couple decades' experience as a software developer in the private and public sectors. She led her team's successful adoption of Scrum-ban for a mission-critical regulatory compliance project under multi-agency state and federal government oversight... Read More →



Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
H1

3:45pm EDT

Writing better BDD scenarios (Seb Rose, Gaspar Nagy)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Behaviour Driven Development is an agile development technique that improves collaboration between technical and non-­technical members of the team, by exploring the problem using examples. These examples then get turned into executable specifications, often called ‘scenarios’. The scenarios should be easy to read by all team members, but writing them expressively is harder than it looks!
In this 75 minute workshop you will learn how to write expressive BDD scenarios. We’ll start by giving you a very brief introduction to BDD/ATDD. You’ll then be introduced to different writing styles by reviewing pre­prepared scenarios. Finally, you’ll get a chance to write your own scenarios based on examples that we’ll bring along.
We’ll be using Gherkin, the syntax used by Cucumber and SpecFlow ­ but you won’t need a computer. And, you'll leave with a checklist of tips that you can use the next time you sit down to write a scenario.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - Identify common Gherkin pitfalls
  • - Write compact, readable living documentation
  • - Enumerate 5 tips/hints for writing good scenarios
  • - Explain the difference between essential and incidental details
  • - Describe how precise, concrete examples illustrate concise, abstract rules/requirements/acceptance criteria
  • - Use the Test Automation Pyramid and Iceberg to convince colleagues to mention the UI less in scenarios

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Gaspar Nagy

Gaspar Nagy

coach, trainer and BDD addict, Spec Solutions
I am the creator and main contributor of SpecFlow, regular conference speaker, blogger (http://gasparnagy.com), editor of the BDD Addict monthly newsletter (http://bddaddict.com), and co-author of the book "BDD Books: Discovery - Explore behaviour using Examples" (http://bddbooks.com... Read More →
avatar for Seb Rose

Seb Rose

Director, Cucumber Limited
I have been involved in the full development lifecycle with experience that ranges from Architecture to Support, from BASIC to Ruby. I'm a partner in Cucumber Limited, who help teams adopt and refine their agile practices, with a particular focus on collaboration, BDD and automated... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
F3

4:30pm EDT

Elevate your Changemaking with LEAN + Design for Social Impact (April Jefferson)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Social change is complex and it's often overwhelming to determine how to make a measurable impact. Change makers know the ins and outs of feeling inspired only to lead to failure and burnout. Many activists and nonprofit projects take a waterfall approach or do the big design process up front. Imagine co-creating change differently.
Explore with us how lean-agile empowered design thinking, influenced social impact within Detroit. Discover how you can apply our learnings for your social impact projects. Be prepared to walk away empowered to act on your ideas to impact social good using your professional knowledge around agile, lean, and UX.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • How lean, agile, and UX goes beyond software development and can be leveraged for social issues.
  • How partnering around an idea can rally people to join you in creating an impact.
  • How using empathy and identifying a root cause can create a vision for people to unify around.
  • How collaboration cultivates a path forward with people despite their initial position.
  • How positive coaching is pivotal for engagement and successfully navigating ideas of those impacted.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for April Jefferson

April Jefferson

President and Owner, April Jefferson Corp.
April Jefferson is an Agile transformation consultant and organizational change coach. She is passionate about empowering others to foster social change and uses Agile, Lean, UX, design thinking and open space to create awesome solutions and positive organizational cultures. She helps... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 4:30pm - 5:00pm EDT
Wekiwa 1&2
 
Wednesday, August 9
 

10:45am EDT

Leading an Agile Team in a Hierarchical Asian culture with Happiness (Alexandre Cuva)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Imagine that you have the mission to open a company in a country whose culture promotes hierarchical respect. Within the family, in school, and through university you are consistently taught from infancy to respect your elders, and never to argue with them.
Ladies and Gentlemen, Welcome to Asia!!! Two years ago, I started upon this adventure to realize my dream, creating a company whose purpose is to promote: flat organizational, emergent leadership, learning motivated, Agile and Lean practices, learning from failure
When we sold our concepts here at the local Universities, the first reactions were surprise and curiosity, with management of other companies telling us it could never be done. We were told that, in Vietnam, strict control was required to make people work and accomplish anything.
This story is that of an Agile offshore setup, created by an Agile Coach. It is a story of fast growth, and near-death, only to come back stronger than before. Our employees have created a high level working culture that helps us not only to survive the hard times but uses the lessons learned to advance even further.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • * Our experience in an offshore environment
  • * The tool that proved to create an awesome innovative culture
  • * How we disrupted the Hierarchical culture
  • * Our experience in Agile/Lean team in a Hierarchical culture

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Alexandre Cuva

Alexandre Cuva

Co-Founder & Agile Coach, Finix Asia
Alexandre Cuva is a passionate agile problem-solver, Scrum, Agile Lean coach from Vietnam, Switzerland, and Italy. Having more than 19 years working experience in the software industry, in the financial, insurance, telecom, outsourcing and government sectors, he coach and trains methods... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 10:45am - 11:15am EDT
Wekiwa 1&2

10:45am EDT

The Power of Play - Coaching Teams to Play at Work (Laura Powers)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Does a group play because they are a team? Or are they a team because they play?  
Where does the idea of “play” fit into coaching teams? It is just a stress reliever, distraction or reward? Recent research indicates that play is not a by-product of a great team. It is actually a critical catalyst. Play supports higher and more stable team performance, better problem- solving, stronger decision-making, increased resiliency in the face of failure, and greater flexibility when things inevitably change. In other words – play is a natural antidote for the challenges of the modern agile world. As coaches – we can coach our teams towards higher performance by creating opportunities for both serious and silly play.
In this fast-paced playshop, we will explore the world of play by playing! Based on the National Bestseller “Play” by Stuart Brown, M.D. – this session examines the recent research on the benefits of play and the alignment of modern business play with coaching Agile teams. Participants will play a game to discover their own "play personality" amongst the eight “play personalities” proposed by Dr. Brown, and we'll explore practical applications as coaches to leverage the play personalities on teams to achieve better business outcomes along with more fun!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Explain what play is and isn't
  • List at least 3 research-based benefits for the power of play at work
  • List 5 different types of business play with examples
  • Describe the 8 different play personalities or play styles
  • Identify your own top two personal play personalities
  • Describe how Agile coaches can use their understanding of play personalities to introduce productive play to their Agile teams
  • Identify at least one action to take with their Agile teams back at work

Attachments:

Speakers

Wednesday August 9, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
I3

10:45am EDT

How to Reboot Your Agile Team! (Maurizio Mancini, Martin Lapointe)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Why do so many organizations struggle to put in place mature Agile teams that can apply proper Agile principles and deliver awesome products? Some people will say, “Agile is hard” as an excuse to not do Agile or to become frAgile. Well we think we have developed a method to reboot any Agile team that just doesn’t seem to be maturing and we want to share it with you!
If you are thinking of scaling Agile across a large organization, then this talk is a must to attend to help ensure your teams have the right foundation. Organizations wanting to scale Agile must have a solid foundation of mature Agile teams who embrace the Agile values and have the right Agile mindset.
Over the years, as we have done Agile transformations in different organizations, we have seen common patterns that keep repeating. The most common pattern we found in our experience is that teams are frAgile. Too many either pretend to be Agile or don’t even know Agile is not a methodology, so organizations question the value of using Agile. Very often the confusion and frustration that comes with thinking that a team is Agile when they are not Agile, brings people right back to their old habits of command and control. Creating successful mature Agile teams is not magic, you just need to discover the right recipe!
In this talk, we will reveal our secrets on how to reboot any struggling Agile/Scrum team in 5 sprints. Attendees will learn how we applied our special ingredients as we experimented with more than 30 teams over a number of years and we refined the know-how. This recipe has proven to be successful in different organizations and teams delivering different types of products. Our Creative-Destruction approach goes through a human change process we labeled The M&M Transformation Plan.
Once you have the foundation in place, then the 5 sprints to reboot the team are:
Sprint 1: Run in the rain
Sprint 2: Thunderstruck
Sprint 3: Start the M&M pain machine
Sprint 4: Open-up and look at the sun
Sprint 5: Removing the training wheels
And by using these 5 sprints, attendees will discover the 5th Agile value!
We bring all of the ideas together in a functional canvas that any practitioner or manager can use.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to lay the foundation of an Agile Reboot to ensure success of the Reboot.
  • How to take an existing team and have them conduct an assessment of how they are doing.
  • As an Agile coach, how do you build trust with the team you are intervening in.
  • Determining and providing the right amount of training so that everyone is on the same page.
  • How to apply the Creative-Destruction paradigm.
  • How to reboot the team and introduce fun and cadence.
  • How to let the team take ownership and succeed.
  • A Review of the M&M Transformation Canvas so that each attendee can assess if their team needs a reboot.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Martin Lapointe

Martin Lapointe

Agile Coach, AgileKlix
Martin began his career as a multimedia developer when Macromedia was all over the Web. He then quickly moved into management and had the opportunity to experience different approaches and mindsets. In the early years, Xtreme Programming (XP), transformed his view of how work can... Read More →
avatar for Maurizio Mancini

Maurizio Mancini

Agile/Enterprise Coach and Transformation Agent, Exempio
Maurizio Mancini is a leader in the quality and process industries with a sixth sense for Agile, quality, and business process. He is best known for cutting through the noise and getting to the heart of any organizational problem whether that problem consists of choosing the right... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
Wekiwa 6

10:45am EDT

The Big Agile Draw: Getting People to the Whiteboard (Gary Greenwood, Mark Lotter)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
The Big Agile Draw: Getting people to the whiteboard
Have you ever sat in a grooming meeting covering complex story relationships without really understanding how the pieces fit together? Did someone ever scratch out a drawing that made it all become clear, in a way that words alone could not capture? I’ve been in those meetings and was struck by how much a simple drawing can help. That led us to the exploration of whiteboarding and how we can all use it to improve collaboration on agile teams.
Drawings and sketches work because they make the abstract more accessible and bring form to ideas. “But, wait!” you say, “I’m not a designer! I can’t draw!” Fear not. There is no secret whiteboarding club. The drawing is not about you and your drawing prowess or lack thereof. It’s about having better conversations and communication because people can see – not just hear – what you’re talking about.
A Design Thinking evangelist and a Seasoned Agile Coach pair up to shed light on Why Drawing Works while giving participants an array of tools that lead to better conversations. Participants will team up to transform simple shapes into meaningful icons that combine to tell a story from a users perspective. Progressive elaboration of these user stories will add increasingly complicated layers to the diagram, but fear not as the complexity will be demystified as drawing techniques will be provided 'just in time.' The workshop will result in a visual user story that is split and participants that have tools and techniques to improve collaboration and communication on their teams.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How drawing lends itself to having better conversations and richer communication
  • How to transform simple shapes into meaningful icons
  • How to visually represent user stories with diagrams
  • How to use visual records to reduce friction and represent different perspectives

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Gary Greenwood

Gary Greenwood

Agile Coach, Summa
I'm passionate about helping teams evolve
avatar for Mark Lotter

Mark Lotter

Summa
Designer who helps teams work visually, focus on people’s needs, and create solutions that solve meaningful problems.



Wednesday August 9, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
I2

10:45am EDT

Software Development Waste (Results from Evidence-Based Research) (Todd Sedano)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
This research redefines our understanding of software development waste. This presentation reveals the first evidence-based software development waste taxonomy.
Software development projects manifest nine types of waste: building the wrong feature or product, mismanaging the backlog, rework, unnecessarily complex solutions, extraneous cognitive load, psychological distress, waiting/multitasking, knowledge loss, and ineffective communication.
While Lean Software Development has a waste taxonomy, Lean Sofware Development mapped manufacturing wastes to software development.
Developing software is fundamentally different than assembly line work.
The Pivotal culture of removing waste does align nicely with many of the goals of Lean Software Development.
Since software development is a complex socio-technical activity that involves coordinating different disciplines and skill sets, it provides ample opportunities for waste to emerge. Waste is any activity that produces no value for the customer or user.
I conducted a two-year five-month participant-observation study of eight software development projects at Pivotal, a software development consultancy. I interviewed 33 software engineers, interaction designers, and product managers, and analyzed one year of retrospection topics.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will learn how software development wastes are unique from those in the Toyota Production System
  • Participants will be able to discover hidden wastes in their software process.
  • Participants will be emboldened to discuss wastes in their next team retro.
  • Participants will learn how evidence-based research can be applied to agile software development projects.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Todd Sedano

Todd Sedano

Engineering Manager, VMware


Wednesday August 9, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
Wekiwa 7&8

10:45am EDT

Time Theft - How Hidden & Unplanned Work Commit the Perfect Crime (Dominica DeGrandis)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Invisible work competes with known work. Invisible work blindsides people, leaving teams unaware of mutually critical information. Married to this problem, is the question, how does one plan for, or allocate capacity for the invisible? It’s tough to analyze something you can’t see. Incognito work doesn’t show up well in metrics. Hidden work steals time away from important priorities. Hidden work also masks dependencies across siloed teams and increases total department work-in-progress, which lengthens cycle time.
The State of DevOps 2016 report considers the amount of unplanned work a measure of quality. Data shows that high performers spend 11% more time working on planned work vs. unplanned work -- because the more unplanned work, the less time exists to create and deliver value work. Bringing visibility to and measuring unplanned work is a necessary capability for any organization serious about implementing DevOps in order to reduce risk and improve performance.
Risk accumulates from work delivered late and started late. One solution is to expose the hidden work thieves that steal your time away from planned work. This talk exposes five thieves of time that prevent teams from delivering value quick, and provides actionable steps for how to see and how to measure unplanned work.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to make unplanned work, dependencies, conflicting priorities and neglected work visible.
  • How to measure and report on planned work vs. unplanned work
  • How to collect and present important metrics that CIO's care about - How to reduce risk and increase predictability

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Dominica DeGrandis

Dominica DeGrandis

Principal Flow Advisor, Tasktop
Dominica DeGrandis is Principal Flow Advisor at Tasktop, where she helps customers improve the flow of work across value streams. Responsible for introducing customers to flow-based aspects of digital transformation, she guides IT teams and business teams to understand and adopt new... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
H3

10:45am EDT

Positively Productive (Judith Mills)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Did you know that creating the right positive environment could increase productivity by up to 31%? Research tells us that this is possible so come and join the discussion on positivity’s impact in the workplace.
We will investigate the factors that influence positivity, discuss the things in our workplace that reduce it and experience some effects of a positive experiment.
Let’s discuss where we begin and how to influence our environments to create a positively productive Agile workplace.

Learning Outcomes:
  • The impact of positivity/negativity
  • Unintentional negative signals we send/receive every day
  • Choosing to be positive
  • Different types of positivity
  • Taking first steps

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Judith Mills

Judith Mills

Coach, Judith Mills Consulting
Judith Mills is interested in people. Rising through the ranks from software engineer to VP Development at a global software company, Judith is equally comfortable talking with teams about building great applications as she is working on organizational strategy in the boardroom. Her... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
H4

10:45am EDT

One Portfolio Progress Report across All Project Types - It Can be Done! (Geri Winters)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
In many companies (especially large ones) there is a need to have one report showing the progress of all projects in a portfolio. These progress reports are typically based on phases because that is traditionally how projects were run and reported. But phase-based metrics are not a good fit for all projects. Many methodologies (such as Scrum and Kanban) are based on outcomes and not phases.
Instead of forcing all teams to create artificial phases to report against, we can look at a different approach to metrics that will allow each kind of project or implementation team to track progress in a meaningful way for them and yet roll-up into one view of progress for the portfolio.
During this talk, we will review different ways of reporting progress at a project level, then will show how to roll that data up into one report of progress for the portfolio. By creating a progress report that is not tied to one specific methodology, we make it possible for any team or project to work in the way that best fits the work and still have a consistent way to report on progress. Finally, we will review methods for using the new progress report to determine which projects may have issues, determine how serious the issues may be, and decide what to do about them.
Example reports and report templates will be available for download to session participants.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the importance of defining and estimating work items for reporting progress
  • Learn about different kinds of scope items and when each is appropriate
  • Learn how to report on progress based on scope items
  • Understand the importance of trends in interpreting results
  • Learn how to interpret the results at the portfolio level

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Geri Winters

Geri Winters

Founder, Wyyzzk, Inc.
I'm all about sharing my knowledge and experience with others. In recent years, my professional work includes mentoring leadership of huge initiatives, sharing my knowledge on a larger scale by writing books and speaking at conferences (see my Amazon author page), and reaching out... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
H1

10:45am EDT

Building Agility into regulated mobile software testing projects (JeanAnn Harrison)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Working on a regulated product requires certain goals to be met to satisfy regulated auditors along with balancing out achieving test coverage to release a high quality mobile software product. Testing mobile apps can be complex task but adding the goal of meeting regulations can be overwhelming.
Team members must work together to blend meeting regulations, understand user experience tests based on priorities and severity levels to allow for iterative sprints. Testers and Developers need to communicate the inter-dependencies and include prioritized user stories based on severity levels which will help to achieve that high level of test coverage and avoid high risks.
How a tester works with their project team will be key achieving agility in these software projects. Jean Ann will present techniques to inspire project teams to develop what will work best for their company culture.
This session will cover:
1. Mobile App project teams must establish risk management and actionable mitigation tasks prior to each project release. Teams work to establish priorities and severities based on User stories. 5 min
2. Testers work with project team members to help develop test ideas based on the user stories and assigning those stories considering severity and priority. 5 min
3. Group exercise: Create test ideas of a mobile app based on a provided user story for a medical device. Think about severity and priority for users, for project team, for regulated auditors. 15 min
4. Testers & developers are tasked to build quality not only in the mobile app itself but also the inter-dependencies of a full system approach. 15 min
5. Group Exercise: Create a test where an inter-dependent condition could affect software behavior. 15 min
6. Testers provide responsive feedback on the user stories, the testing conducted while the mobile app is being developed through iterations and meeting regulations. 10 min
7. Questions 10 min

Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Testers will work with project team to incorporate quality and meeting regulations early in planning tests for mobile projects in a regulated environment.
  • 2. Testers will help project team members to create user stories with priorities and severities assigned giving testers specific goals to focus with each sprint.
  • 3. Testers will understand to work closely with development which inter-dependencies can affect how users will be affected by the mobile app.

Attachments:

Speakers

Wednesday August 9, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
H2

2:00pm EDT

Automation test - 20 years after... (Marcelo Walter)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Automating tests is one of the first practices in agile, and one of the biggest leverage that we can have in the development process, as it supports almost all of others.
Why is this not a reality, even among those companies who define themselves as agile?
The difficulties are very similar:
  • Unfriendly frameworks: Existing test frameworks usually address only specific languages, architectures, and type of tests.
  • Non-adherent culture: Implement automated tests is not just add a phase on development cycle. To be successful, we need a mindset change. The system must be driven to test since the conceptual start. And this culture must be accepted and engaged from everyone in the process.
  • Lack of technical support and knowledge: To implement good test scripts, we need a lot of complimentary tools and architectural approaches that is not so easy to truly learn.
  • Too much legacy code: This is one of most common excuse: “We cannot test our system because there is a big legacy involved”.
  • Too much time to run: From some teams that started automating tests, this is another excuse: “Automated tests are good but, as we are growing up, this practice is not sustainable because it spend much time to run all the tests and get feedback”.
  • And so on...
This session will show a way to get over these issues, addressing every issue with real cases of automation test. Our experience comes from almost 20 years working on a legacy, critical, and giant system.
What did work? What didn’t? Where did we have to invest? What about scalability? Is there any shortcut?
It is a long history, that will benefit technical developers, managers and agile enthusiasts, since it shows how attitudes make the difference, when talking about overcoming obstacles and evolving.
In the end, we will show the little answer: - Yes, we still have the first test, written in 1998, and running after every single commit!

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • The problem of scaling automated tests is quite common in large systems. This report addresses this issue with a great success case. Moreover, it is a great story to see how automated testing are fundamental, demystifying the fallacy of complexity and legacy. Moreover, it is a good example of how automated testing is fundamental in order to demystify the fallacy of complexity and legacy.
  • During the presentation, we will answer some questions, such as:
  • How to deal with complex scenarios where the solution depends upon the evolution of a virtual clock?
  • How to improve performance of tests that depends on data population?
  • How to deal with integrated tests and external systems?
  • How much of each kind of test should be implement, considering unit, functional, integrated, and UI?
  • Where could you have the biggest increase of quality?
  • How to obtain a better execution efficiency, considering processing, memory, threads, and order.
  • What about when running on a single machine is not an option?
  • How to scale more and more?
  • What happens if you decide to change the development language along the way?
  • How to deal with intermittent test results?
  • How to handle testing concurrency?
  • How to automate tests with production data, combining performance and production settings?

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Marcelo Walter

Marcelo Walter

Agile Coach, Objective Solutions
I work with agile methodologies since 2001. I have experience in agile at scale using XP, Scrum and kanban. Using agile to solve our own problems. As coach and manager knowing tech aspects, I love automation and indicators to measure the success by numbers. Deep experience in automated... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm EDT
Wekiwa 1&2

2:00pm EDT

CANCELLED: That Will Never Work: Giving Feedback that Sparks Brilliance in Others (Kara Minotti Becker)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Having to give feedback on someone else’s work is enough to keep us all up at night. Managers, coaches, subject matter experts and colleagues, we all grapple with how best to put our knowledge to use for others. And if giving feedback is hard, encouraging someone to open to new ideas can be even harder.
Yet in the Agile organization, where collaboration is king, mastering the art of feedback is crucial. From code reviews to coaching, design cycles to demos, the feedback and iteration loop is a constant.
Great reviews by experienced colleagues and leaders can make the difference between good enough and truly brilliant. Done poorly, reviews can crush ingenuity and destroy motivation, resulting in innovative solutions that never see the light of day.
In this hands-on workshop, practice a practical, straightforward method of giving feedback that sparks ideas and fans the flames of motivation. Move from critiquing, to contributing and inspiring. Make respectful, highly productive and fun review sessions a signature part of your skillset.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Give work-product (strategy, code, design, writing, etc.) feedback for the best possible results.
  • Hold respectful, productive and fun review sessions, on any kind of work, using a straightforward method you get to practice live.
  • Spark ideas that are much better than your own, and delight when your suggestions are not taken.
  • Experience practice in something we almost never get to practice safely: giving feedback on another’s work.
  • Learn how it feels to receive feedback that stirs your creativity and ignites your motivation.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Kara Minotti Becker

Kara Minotti Becker

Management Consultant in Agile Engineering
Kara Minotti Becker lives in perennial pursuit of the delicate balancing edge between human happiness and engineering excellence. In this surprising and ever-changing field of work, she uses her deep experience in communications, process and software engineering, creativity, motivation... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
I4

2:00pm EDT

Fluent in Team Culture: The First Shift in Achieving Agility (Diana Larsen, Bonnie Aumann)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Every organization expects its teams to produce value, and convey other business benefits. But what is the best fit "Agile" for your team, as it moves through a VUCA (volatile, uncertain, complex, ambiguous) world? What does it take for a group of humans (programmers, testers, product managers, etc.) to make the shift from individual contributors to team mates? To form a team and to collaborate? How do you make good on the benefits the your business (and customers) need?
In this session, Diana Larsen and Bonnie Aumann will answer those questions and others. We'll consider teams as complex adaptive human systems. We'll examine the behaviors and practices that form patterns of effective collaboration. We will explore the ways that teams move into and through fluent proficiency using the lenses of group coherence, coaching, value creation, and other needs in the first zone of the Agile Fluency™ Model. We will inspect ways to adapt to new conditions and team changes over time. Join us!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will:
  • Deepen understanding of complex adaptive systems and how humans form systems
  • Gain language for discussing complexity and team coherence
  • Examine behaviors for effective team collaboration
  • Review the Agile Fluency Model and the role of practice fluency in teamwork
  • Apply these concepts to their "home" teams

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Bonnie Aumann

Bonnie Aumann

Coach | Collaborator, Bluestreak Collaborative | Agile Fluency Project
avatar for Diana Larsen

Diana Larsen

Co-founder & Chief Connector, Agile Fluency Project, LLC
Diana Larsen is a co-founder, chief connector, and principal mentor at the Agile Fluency® Project. Diana co-authored the books Agile Retrospectives: Making Good Teams Great; Liftoff: Start and Sustain Successful Agile Teams; Five Rules for Accelerated Learning. She co-originated... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
I1

2:00pm EDT

Defining Value: Perspective Is Everything! (Angela Wick)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
What is value? How do we know that the product and its features are bringing value to the customer? This elusive term has so much meaning that can easily be dismissed. We will explore what value really means and types of value that products provide to customers. We will also look at how products provide value and customer experience value at different levels of detail (product, feature and design levels). Additionally we will discuss how teams and individuals can use a definition of value to explore, discover, and ultimately deliver and execute on value in everything they do. Come redefine what value means to your product and customers and deliver truly value products!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Explore different perspectives on what value is
  • Discover how to determine which perspective matters to your customers and users
  • Uncover techniques to ensure value is delivered every time in your product!

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Angela Wick

Angela Wick

CEO/Principal Trainer/Coach/Consultant, BA-Squared, LLC
I am passionate about modernizing requirements practices and helping organizations collaborate on a Product Vision aligned to strategy and guiding them to a meaningful backlog and iterations that keep customer and organizational value top of mind. I coach and teach organizations... Read More →



Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
H1

2:00pm EDT

Legendary Adventures in Legacy Code (David Laribee)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
We begin with a story - a story about a legendary monster (15,000+ line class) I recently engaged in mortal combat. No spoilers. It wasn't pretty, but here I stand to tell the tale, at the ready to enter the fray once again.
Throughout our campaign we’ll take a few side quests and journeys into the three realms of technical debt:
  • The alignments - OR - what mindsets help when battling demonic code versus forming a party?
  • The armory - OR - what weapons are available to you? When do you brandish them?
  • The lore and landscape - OR - Where did these damned dragons come from in the first place?
This talk employs a nerdy, fantastical, and fun system metaphor to help us escape the confines of the dominant mental model for legacy code: technical debt. All tools and tactics presented are based on experience, not fantasy. While there will be images of Cthulhu, Chromatic Dragons, and Vampyres, attendees should expect code examples, hands-on exercises, technical deep dives and practical lessons learned.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Acquire experience with a toolkit for assessing legacy code qualitatively and quantitatively.
  • Learn how to visualize code quality and effect of team practices (such as collective ownership) on quality.
  • Learn how to engage your team its leadership in making choices about which code to invest in.
  • Understand dynamics and relationship of valuing delivery over valuing quality and vice versa.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for David Laribee

David Laribee

Principal, Nerd/Noir
David Laribee is a product development coach with deep roots in Lean, Agile, XP and Scrum. He believes in the power of collaboration, simplicity and feedback. Over the last 20 years, David has built teams and products for companies at every scale. He’s founded startups and consulted... Read More →



Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
F3

2:00pm EDT

You can do better than the Spotify Model (Joakim Sundén, Catherine Peck-Phillips)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Let's put aside the "bubblegum and unicorns" of the Spotify Engineering Culture videos and talk about what doesn't quite work at Spotify and how we're trying to solve it. This is a failure / learning report intended for coaches and other change agents who need encouragement that it's always hard AND it's always possible to improve.
The talk will feature the different perspectives of two coaches: one of the first coaches at Spotify who grew up with "the Spotify model" and one of our more recent coaches coming from a company trying to implement it.

Learning Outcomes:
  • * Spotify is used as a framework/model copied by others, but Spotify's model isn't without challenges even for Spotify
  • * Encouragement that it's always hard AND it's always possible to improve
  • * It's great to be inspired by others but at the end of the day you need to face your difficulties and solve your problems yourself
  • *You can succeed with autonomy by never giving up; it comes with challenges and benefits

Attachments:

Speakers

Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
F4

2:00pm EDT

Epic Rap Battle of Agility - Bring Fun Back to Learning (Joe Ziadeh, Jolene Jangles)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
How can you inspire people to think outside of the box when we resort to death by PowerPoint? To get people to think and learn differently you need to teach them differently. To foster a culture of innovation and learning we need to show people that we are innovating in our teaching as well. This requires finding new, fun, and engaging ways to teach. But this isn’t magic. There are patterns and formulas that can be taught and applied quickly.
In this session we will quickly walk through brain based learning techniques highlighting engagement methods common in music, movies, and TV. We will breakdown aspects of Training from the Back of the Room, hooks and even the formulas behind writing a good joke. We will also demo a quick game we created using these methods titled “Epic Rap Battle of Agility” to show how we use these concepts to teach agile principles and concepts. Finally, you will work as a team with other attendees to create an engaging short video to post on social media and/or bring back to your organization. 
In the end you will leave with the tools you need to bring the fun back to learning in your organizations. When you return to work and start using these skills you will demonstrate the fun, courage, and openness that your organization needs to truly become a learning organization. You will pass this on to your students, and by applying it to their work they will aid you in creating a true learning organization.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Explain the art and science behind creating engaging learning using the 6 Trumps.
  • Demonstrate the basic techniques behind comedy writing and gamification to make your learning fun.
  • State the difference between an ordinary lecture based training session and brain based training.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Joe Ziadeh

Joe Ziadeh

Director of Process Definition and Measurement, Express Scripts
I'm happy to talk about anything Agile. But I personally love neuroscience, Training from the Back of the Room, rap, public speaking, innovation games, change management, and team building.


Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
I2

2:00pm EDT

Portfolio Visualization and Prioritization for Business Agility - Workshop (Bob Payne, George Dinwiddie)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Visual Management has long been a key part of agile and lean. This talk will explore real world examples of visual management systems and discuss the hidden power of visualization and transparency in an enterprise setting. Participants in this interactive workshop will work with examples of team, portfolio and enterprise management walls to understand how the visualizations create context for real decision making. Participants will tour and design/prototype an improvement for the example boards.
Many organizations talk about driving change through transparency and an empowered, informed workforce. A picture can say a thousand words, we will highlight examples of enterprises that have stopped telling and started showing. An agile team is but a piece of a larger value stream. By embedding the team’s visual management system in the context of the Portfolio and Enterprise Wall, the team has the context of what is coming, how it ties to corporate goals and the impact of the working software delivered.
Own the board and let the information do the talking.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Introduction to a variety of real-world visual management tools
  • Ways in which visual management tools inform at all levels: Executive, Management and Development
  • Achieving transparency without micromanagement using visual management
  • Collaboration via conversation and visual management
  • Steering for success through visual management
  • Identifying problems through visual management
  • The power and flexibility of tactile visual management tools

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for George Dinwiddie

George Dinwiddie

Grand Poobah and Jack of All Trades, iDIA Computing, LLC
George Dinwiddie helps organizations develop software more effectively. He brings decades of development experience from electronic hardware and embedded firmware to business information technology. He helps organizations, managers, and teams solve the problems they face by providing... Read More →
avatar for Bob Payne

Bob Payne

SVP of Agile Transformation, LitheSpeed
An early adopter of Extreme Programming, Scrum, and SAFe, Bob Payne has worked exclusively as a Lean+Agile Transformation leader since 1999.Bob hosts the Agile Toolkit podcast and has produced over 170 podcasts, recording a variety of industry leaders and Agile practitioners. His... Read More →



Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
F1

2:00pm EDT

Three Practices for Paying Ongoing Attention to System Qualities (Rebecca Wirfs-Brock)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Does your team have trouble focusing on anything other than implementing features? System qualities such as performance, maintainability or reliability don’t happen by magic. They need explicit attention and focus. What can we as system quality advocates—whether testers, developers, product owners, architects or project managers—do to raise awareness of the qualities of our systems? You’ve probably heard the mantra: make it work, make it right, make it fast. But it can be difficult to retrofit certain qualities into an existing implementation. Making it right means more than verifying the functionality meets stakeholder needs; it also means delivering on the qualities we want in our system. In this session you will be introduced to three simple techniques for specifying system qualities and paying attention to them: landing zones, quality scenarios, and quality checklists. You will also have an opportunity to briefly practice each technique. Yes, you can introduce simple practices that allow you and your team to pay ongoing attention to system quality.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how to use and define a landing zone for key quality attributes
  • Understand the mechanics of writing a quality scenario for "normal" and failure/recovery actions
  • Understand how to co-create two kinds of quality-related checklists: do-confirm, and read-review
  • Learn how to identify natural pause points in your work where checklists can be useful

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Wirfs-Brock Associates
I'm best known as the "design geek" who invented Responsibility-Driven Design and the xDriven meme (think TDD, BDD, DDD..). I'm keen about team effectiveness, communicating complex requirements, software quality, agile QA, pragmatic TDD, and patterns and practices for architecting... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
Wekiwa 6

2:45pm EDT

Modernizing Cassini: Approaching Agile After a Decade at Saturn (Andrea Connell)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
NASA’s Cassini mission to Saturn launched in 1997, and has been orbiting the ringed planet continuously since arrival in 2004. Throughout this time, the Mission Sequencing Subsystem team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed software used to design and validate the spacecraft’s science activities. As we learn more about Saturn and plan more daring maneuvers, the software systems need to be updated. These systems were created before modern architecture and development process frameworks were popular, and typical legacy software challenges are heightened in the limited-funding and risk-adverse environment of a flagship planetary mission. This talk will describe our evolution of teamwork, testing strategy, and procedures over the years.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Legacy products with long-running teams can successfully switch to Scrum, but should invest in training for each team member
  • Deep domain knowledge requirements make collaboration difficult
  • If the software architecture doesn’t allow for complete test automation, look for partial automation opportunities and build on them
  • Creating configurable tests at the right level can reduce long-term test maintenance burden
  • Process automation can help to improve throughput in the face of rigid organizational requirements

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Connell

Andrea Connell

Software Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology
Andrea Connell has held many roles in her ten-year technical career, including Software Developer, Database Administrator, Certified ScrumMaster, and Test Engineer. Andrea earned her Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science from the University of Wisconsin - La Crosse and Master’s... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:45pm - 3:15pm EDT
Wekiwa 1&2

2:45pm EDT

Co-location: it's not you, it's me. Coping with the realities of global teams. (Mitch Goldstein, Gary Greenwood)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
What does the future hold for distributed teams? As more companies embrace the appeal of 'no office' as well as the lure of reduced technical labor costs, how will this affect the ability to deliver value? Can new collaborative tools and nearly limitless bandwidth and storage make products easier or harder to produce with high quality? Can you envision the team of the future? Can you imagine a time where organizations focus solely on assembling the right mix of talent from anywhere in the world - and even consider physical co-location to be quaint and unnecessary?
The success of distributed agile teams relies heavily on ability to maintain a cooperative atmosphere in an environment where members are widely dispersed both geographically and temporally. Managing a backlog is difficult enough with a co-located team - introducing time zones, geographic location, cultural mismatches and language barriers can contribute quickly to manifestation of organizational anti-patterns. Thoughtful and forward-thinking practices can minimize avoidable failures and maintain member enthusiasm.
Gary and Mitch will offer real-world insight and experience (as well as display their battle scars) to share ideas and strategies the people who will make up the teams of the future. They will discuss maintaining and enhancing agile and lean foundational principles by the use of the latest distributed technologies. Proxification, which empowers distributed teams to manage and organize independently, is a key concept to allow for tight coordination of business and operational activities, and prevent bottlenecks from impairing delivery of value. The talk aims to demystify and embrace proxies, which many organizations are hesitant to employ, to help unlock the intrinsic value of knowledge workers across the globe.
The talk intends to persuade attendees that agile and lean principles apply at all levels of scale, from small scrum and kanban teams to large scale organizations with sophisticated DevOps practices, and that these practices will ensure continued innovation and adaptability to global value streams.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Whether co-located, distributed on-shore or off-shore, the principles of high-performing agile and lean teams still apply.
  • The use of tools such as distributed checklists help build consensus and trust amongst distributed team members.
  • The practice of actualizing strategic and tactical proxies to eliminate bottlenecks and de-centralize day-to-day decision making.
  • Identifying and reporting on which metrics most effectively measure success and improvement.
  • Effectively and efficiently managing inter-team dependencies in a global enterprise.
  • Recapture time potentially lost by synchronizing with widely distributed teams.
  • Looping globally distributes value streams into coordinated DevOps practices.
  • The future will tend toward more distributed teams, expanded 24-hour DevOps, and global communities of practice.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Mitch Goldstein

Mitch Goldstein

Technical Agile Coach, Summa
I love to talk about User Stories - I think it's the most neglected and critical topic in agile practice. I love to discuss creation and splitting of user stories (my specialty) as well as how organizations can get more agile with SAFe or other forms of scaling.
avatar for Gary Greenwood

Gary Greenwood

Agile Coach, Summa
I'm passionate about helping teams evolve


Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:45pm - 3:15pm EDT
Wekiwa 3&4

3:45pm EDT

Fragile Agile: Coaching a Tired Team (Anna Obukhova)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
As an Agile Coach or Scrum Master do you want to add energy to your team that looks not enthusiastic or resists change? Is is possible to cause harm to your team even with proper Agile coaching? Yes, if you are working with tired, exhausted or even burned-out teams, they do need special treatment, usually counterintuitive to the coaches. Would you like to learn special set of actions, taken from the medical practice, tailored to work with exhausted people? Would you like to experience an upward spiral from tiredness to the true intristic motivation and creativity? Join me in the self test and practical steps discussion what needs to be modified in the coaching and facilitation techniques and in the Agile process that you as a coach or a scrum master can help your worn out team to transition into a better process and produce steady results.

Learning Outcomes:
  • This talk will give a clear idea how the coaching approach should change for working (coaching) with tired agile teams.
  • It includes:
  • - understanding the stage of exhaustion and what is different from the normal state
  • - why traditional Agile transformation might be harmful if the team is tired
  • - What is AgileEnergy phase
  • - dos and donts of working with tired people
  • - tips for coaches and facilitation techniques that will work in such conditions

Attachments:

Speakers

Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
H2

3:45pm EDT

High Performing Teams: Want to watch one in action? Absolutely! (Bryan Miles)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
"Companies know that they derive greater creativity and innovation from teamwork - but what, they wonder, makes a great team?"  -Margaret Heffernan
The research is clear: High performing teams are extremely rare, but their ability to impact an organization is limitless. If we know this is what we're aiming for, why is high performance so elusive and how can organizations and leaders create environments where it can flourish?
Through performance and a facilitated conversation, a small music ensemble will offer insights into their organizational dynamics. In this unique session, participants will have the opportunity to watch and interact with a high performing music team (live and in the flesh!), discuss what makes them a great team, and learn about the various roles that make them who they are. Participants will observe and participate in discussions around what makes the team tick and take away practical examples of how you can supercharge the teams you work with or coach.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will walk away from the session with a greater understanding of:
  • 1. What makes a high performing team
  • 2. What behaviors inspire high performance
  • 3. What behaviors detract from high performance
  • 4. The role of leadership in high performance
  • 5. How they can inspire high performance in the teams they work with

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Bryan Miles

Bryan Miles

Coach, Pliant Solutions


Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
Wekiwa 7&8

3:45pm EDT

Humanizing Large Scaled Transformations FTW! (Nivia Henry)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
It has become all the rage to utilize scaling frameworks to introduce agile in a synchronized and replicable fashion in the enterprise. Having been an enterprise coach for years, I understand the need for such a systemic approach. Oftentimes, what gets lost in these transformations is the humanistic perspective. We get so focused on the framework, that we forget the people.
Join me and fellow participants in a discussion of five key actions that help to humanize transformations: defining the mission together; identifying the value stream; team self-selection; team bootstrap; and keeping the spirit alive post-transformation. This is not another framework, these are deceptively simple steps anyone can take to put people first in their transformation.
Who will benefit from the session?
-Those considering using a scaling framework and lack direct experience
-Those in the middle of a transformation but feel stifled by the structure and lack of innovation
-Those who are nearing the end of their transformation and wonder how to sustain the new culture

Learning Outcomes:
  • Five practical steps for organic scaling that harnesses individuals motivations into meaningful impact:
  • Step 1. Collaborative mission-building: an approach for identifying and articulating the desired business outcome as an invested team
  • Step 2. Value-stream mapping: using a well-known model that identifies the work needed to deliver a product or service
  • Step 3. Team self-selection: a method that empowers teams to self-select their teams based on the value stream identified
  • Step 4. Team bootstrap: a checklist of actions critical to starting a team on the right foot
  • Step 5. Keeping the spirit alive: a discussion about what to expect 3, 6 and 18 months after the initial transformation


Speakers
avatar for Nivia Henry

Nivia Henry

Agile Coach Chapter Lead, Spotify
I believe that great people make great things. This philosophy has translated to a 15-year career building and supporting high performing teams, who continuously deliver great software and experiences. My career path has included agile coaching, enterprise agile transformations... Read More →



Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
Wekiwa 9&10

3:45pm EDT

On Track: The ART of avoiding a Train Wreck (Em Campbell-Pretty)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Since Agile 2013, the "Agileness" of the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) has divided the agile community. Four years on SAFe still has its critics, however according to the 11th Version One State of Agile survey, SAFe is the most widely used of the formal agile scaling methods. So regardless of whether SAFe is Agile, it is being implemented widely, so perhaps it is time for a conversation about the practicalities of succeeding with SAFe. How does one succeed with SAFe? What are the common mistakes that can lead to train wrecks?
Em Campbell-Pretty is one of the world's most experienced SAFe practitioners, having been applying SAFe in the field since before it was called SAFe! In this session she will share war stories and lessons learned from 6 years working with SAFe at some of Australia's largest enterprises.

Learning Outcomes:
  • 9+ tips to avoid a train wreck when implementing SAFe

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Em Campbell-Pretty

Em Campbell-Pretty

Managing Director, Pretty Agile



Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
I2

3:45pm EDT

Change Artist Super Powers: Leading Change in an Agile Manner (Esther Derby)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
"They are resisting." "This shouldn't take so long." "We must hold them accountable to new behaviors." These are complaints I have heard from people working on Agile transformations.
It is true that change often happens more slowly than we'd like. Most organizations have built up processes, organizational structures, and formal and informal incentives that are designed for stability, not flexibility and change. Training and coaching won't overcome this organizational gravity. Sanctions and other forms of pushing also don't help, and certainly aren't truly leadership.
What does work is Change Artistry--skills and judgement to know when and what to nudge to lessen the tug of gravity and allow new practices to take hold. When it comes to leading organizational change, these are my Change Artist Super Powers: Curiosity, Observation, and Experimentation.
In this session, I'll explore the power of curious questions to reveal dynamics, interactions, and habits that hold the current pattern in place. I'll discuss the how and what of observation, and how to make sense of what you see. I'll share a template for experimentation--micro changes--that will help you lead the way to big changes.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Pushing inspires push back.
  • Leading change with curiosity, observation, and experimentation helps you and others to see additional options for action.
  • How to pique your own curiosity, and ask questions that will reveal the dynamics of the current pattern.
  • How and what to observe, and how to make sense of your observations
  • A simple template for organizational experiments

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Esther Derby

Esther Derby

Founder, esther derby associates, inc.
I draw on four decades of experience leading, observing, and living through organizational change. In 1997, I founded esther derby associates, inc. and work with a broad array of clients from Fortune 500 companies to start ups. My approach blends attention to humans and deep knowledge... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
I1

3:45pm EDT

Experimental Agile (David Wallace)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
One of the 4 main points of the Agile Manifesto is individuals and interactions over processes and tools. But over time many organizations have begun implementing Agile “standards” and a prescriptive way of implementing Agile across their teams. And while some boundaries may be necessary, often this leads to the processes taking precedence over what is best for the team and stifles organizational learning.
This workshop will discuss how to use experimentation to break out of your Agile rut and spark a culture of curiosity and learning across your organization. Using real-life examples and opportunities for brainstorming you will see how you can apply the use of experiments to help safely solve problems while minimizing the risk of an experiment gone wrong. Yes, you can learn even from failed experiments. No beakers, test tubes or lab coats required.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Challenging people to evaluate prescriptive practices they may have in place
  • Generating ideas for how to help your teams learn what works best for them
  • Understanding how to structure experiments to be measurable and minimize risk
  • Learning from the experiences of a larger group

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for David Wallace

David Wallace

Agile Coach, Xero
am an Agile Development enthusiast. I believe that developing and delivering usable product in an iterative process gives all parties (Stakeholders, Product Owners, Engineers and Customers) the greatest chance of success. I love to be a part of seeing and helping people succeed. With... Read More →



Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
I4

3:45pm EDT

When Worlds Collide: When Agile Teams Meet Rigid Organizational Process (Ian Eshelman, Cindy Hembrock)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Is agile stuck at the team level in your organization? Is there hope for a more agile enterprise when finance, project management, and portfolio prioritization processes are so rigid? How can we truly evolve to an agile organization when cost containment gets all the headlines and audits loom?
Mastercard is transforming the way the organization thinks about agile for the enterprise. In this session, we will share the details of our journey to organizational agility at Mastercard - even when team level agility is mixed. We will explain how we spread team level agile into the program and portfolio layers, affecting everything from annual budgets and planning to project estimation and support services. You will learn ways to tackle the rigid discipline of software capitalization without tracking hours. We will discuss how we balanced compliance concerns with the flexibility of agile development.
This session goes beyond the theory. We will dig into the details and and share the opportunities and learnings we've had along the way. Through the lens of technology business management, you will see how to shift the perception of the IT department from being a cost-center to a value driver. Attendees will have the chance to have a dialogue on concrete practices to bridge the traditional rigidity of finance and planning with agile practices.

Learning Outcomes:
  • More effectively track work and effort without the administrative burden of hourly time tracking
  • Relentlessly prioritize initiatives while satisfying the organization’s need to manage in quarterly and annual increments
  • Transition planning conversations from “project cost estimates” to “program value creation”
  • Consistently manage work across teams at very different levels of maturity from agile purists to waterfall traditionalists
  • Show status without hours and hours of powerpoint manipulation (aka making up the story)

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ian Eshelman

Ian Eshelman

SVP Development Services, Mastercard
avatar for Cindy Hembrock

Cindy Hembrock

VP, Dev Services, Mastercard


Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
F3

3:45pm EDT

UX and Service Design at the Front-End for IT Projects to Improve Quality and Alignment (Robert Frohman, Melanie St James)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Let’s face it. We are problem solvers. Our IT organizations excel at identifying and deploying solutions. But why are we still witnessing waste and inefficiency even with highly agile delivery teams? Part of the challenge lies at the front-end of the value stream, in clearly defining the problem, identifying desired outcomes and remaining flexible enough to incorporate feedback as the team adapts.
It is necessary that teams have the right skills to assess and balance trade-offs between technology solutions and the needs of the end user and to prioritize feedback. Product Development organizations typically possess these skills, often associated with product management and product ownership, however, IT organizations may lack them. An option to fill this gap is to include people with skills from the fields of User Experience, Service Design, Human-Centered Design and/or Design Thinking.
Why? Because the best UX thinkers are system thinkers who can research and articulate user needs within the context of complex tasks and ecosystems, down to the granularity of the usability of a single mobile interaction. Many UX practitioners are borrowing from Service Design to present journey maps highlighting business opportunities that would have otherwise gone unnoticed. UX is also borrowing from Design Thinking to guide ideation exploring multiple solutions.
IT teams that incorporate UX thinkers early in the value stream are more effective at assessing and prioritizing feedback which helps bring alignment across stakeholders, users, and the project team. This alignment brings efficiency and cohesion to IT projects, greatly increasing the chances of project success.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Review principles of a mature UX process and be able to articulate how UX can contribute to developing a stronger project foundation
  • Gain familiarity with Service Design and Design Thinking
  • Have a new lens through which to plan future projects

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Robert Frohman

Robert Frohman

Head, Agile Transformation Office, SBG, Cisco
Innovative, energetic, and engaging, Robert Frohman has a passion for building effective environments where people and process come together. Working cross-functionally, he blends his experience in software engineering, product development, Agile and Lean practice, leadership, and... Read More →
avatar for Melanie St James

Melanie St James

Chief Experience Officer, The Co8 Group
Melanie is a forward-thinking customer experience leader with a business strategy and product management mindset. Her ability to help teams integrate Service Design, User Experience, Agile, OKRs and Design Thinking allows for the rapid alignment of customer and business needs while... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
Wekiwa 6

4:30pm EDT

The Scrum Reboot – This Time with Scrum Values. (Dave West, Richard Gratton)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Like many companies, Intralinks started their Scrum and Agile journey many years ago, but recently have felt that they were not getting the returns on that investment that they expected. Yes, they were using the words, they assigned the roles, they respected and follwed the ceremonies, but their adoption of Scrum had lost that ‘Agile feeling’ and it felt for many that they were going through the motions. It was time for a Scrum and Agile reboot. What did they miss the first time around?
In this presentation hear Richard Gratton VP Product Management of Intralinks and Dave West, CEO and Product Owner Scrum.org describe the journey Intralinks went through and how a reboot can reset priorities regarding what it really means to adopt Scrum. The second time around, it’s not just about the Scrum teams, it’s about the whole organization, and it’s about what it really means to go Agile.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Learning outcomes
  • • How you know you need a reboot – the signs that your Agile adoption is in name only.
  • • Manage the tough sell of persuading management they need to re-invest in their Agile.
  • • Meet in the middle with bottom-up and top-down Scrum value culture shifts.
  • • What a reboot looks like and why it is aways harder than the first time.
  • • The results at Intralinks.


Speakers
avatar for Dave West

Dave West

CEO / Product Owner, Scrum.org
Dave West is the Product Owner and CEO at scrum.org. He is a frequent keynote speaker and is a widely published author of articles, along with his acclaimed book: Head First Object-Oriented Analysis and Design. He led the development of the Rational Unified Process (RUP) and then... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 4:30pm - 5:00pm EDT
Wekiwa 1&2

4:30pm EDT

Integral but Insufficient: Why the Future Needs More than Agile to be Successful (Mike Griffiths)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
While agile is the best starting point I know of, it alone will not ensure your project or product is successful. I have failed many times using agile with smart, motivated teams despite being deeply involved in agile approaches (I helped create DSDM in 1994, have used agile for 20+ years and served on the board of the Agile Alliance). I have however, also been fortunate to work on many successful projects and with some award-winning teams and have come to realize they all use agile alongside other strategies and approaches; sometimes at the forefront, often times in the background.
This is obvious once you see it, but rarely is it discussed or supported by models or literature. Successful teams use a savvy combination of agile, leadership, domain-specific skills and traditional approaches where they make sense. I believe the future of agile software development will include tools to help navigate this mix of approaches and choose the best combination for the endeavor at hand. Knowledge is weightless whereas processes and ceremonies come with a burden of execution, so we need to choose wisely the approaches we adopt and continue learning from a diverse spectrum of knowledge.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand that agile is a powerful approach, but only one of several approaches that can be used to successfully deliver products and projects.
  • Appreciate that all processes and ceremonies add weight to a project team, but knowledge is weightless and can be applied without penalty.
  • Gain strategies for determining when to apply certain knowledge and skills, tools and techniques
  • Learn how to blend agile with other approaches to be more successful in more situations.

Attachments:

Speakers

Wednesday August 9, 2017 4:30pm - 5:00pm EDT
Wekiwa 3&4
 
Thursday, August 10
 

9:00am EDT

Eating my Own Dogfood: From Enterprise Coach to Team Member (Sean Dunn)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
What happens when you take an agile coach and force them to "eat their own dog food"? This is my personal story about transitioning from an enterprise agile coach to a programmer on a team, and what I learned about agile, coaching, and myself in the process.
After two years of coaching teams and executives around the world, I found myself disillusioned by the concept of "coaching" and back as a developer on a team -- for the first time in 15 years. The experience of returning as a programmer was enlightening; it substantially changed my perspective on coaching and agile. Having worn the shoes of a team member, I acquired a new empathy for their world and perspective.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • 00:00 - My life as an "Enterprise Agile Coach", how I started as a coach and my approach to it.
  • 00:10 - Disillusionment. My world falling apart, how a I started to become jaded about coaching.
  • 00:15 - Life on a team -- growing pains, learning to fit in
  • 00:20 - new perspectives
  • 00:25 - looking back, what I would do differently
  • There's are three story arcs that I intend to weave together:
  • * How "walking in the shoes" of a team member is important, perhaps necessary, to gain the perspective and empathy to be an effective coach
  • * How I perceived "coaching" from the "other side", i.e. "inflicting help" and very natural reasons why a team would be resistant to agile (I totally get it now!)
  • * Where are the leaders? Frustrations with "side-channel" agile
  • * Agile really does have "too many meetings"* I get it! I loathed the standup. Totally interrupted my dev flow.
  • * The danger of "inflicted help" agile coaches
  • * Process really isn't all that important.
  • * When it comes to coaching, leaders must lead by example
  • * Effective change comes from within a team
  • * Coaching needs to explore multiple directions (including technical)
  • * Lame retrospectives are a waste. There's the elephant in the room, but we don't talk about it for one reason or another, so we waste an hour of retrospective time painting the bike shed.


Speakers

Thursday August 10, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am EDT
Wekiwa 1&2

9:00am EDT

Iterative Ethics: Can our moral compass be agile? (Will McNelis)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Our moral and ethical landscape has changed greatly over the last 100 years. We used to be able to view the world very much in terms of right and wrong, black and white, but today we are constantly operating in shades of grey.
We have a recipe for disaster when this is coupled with the fact that everything in our life is now run by software. We must have a way to iterate on our values, morals, and ethics to ensure we are aware of the dilemmas we face daily and the impacts of our choices.
In this session, we will cover codifying a team's ethics to be in line with their companies’ values, and include this in their definition of done (project, feature, story). We will then discuss techniques to review and iterate on ethics in line with the usual feedback cycles.
Basically, let's make sure our work is something we would want to bring home to our mum.
Coming from experience in his current coaching role in the Australian Gambling industry coupled with a background of delivering agile marketing strategies and technology across the Asia Pacific region, Will is uniquely positioned to highlight ethical and moral success stories as well as failures.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Appreciation for the need to consider ethics as part of all of our work
  • A call to action to codify teams' moral compass in line with companies' values
  • Take away ideas to add ethics and morals to story, feature, and project level definition of done

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Will McNelis

Will McNelis

Agile Coach, Tatts Group
Agile, Lean, Technology, Marketing and Communications professional with more than 15 years of diverse expertise in the areas of business management, communications management, web design and development, e-Commerce, search engine optimisation, and digital strategy. I am passionate... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am EDT
Wekiwa 3&4

9:00am EDT

Continuous Improvement for Product Management (Melissa Perri)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
While developing products, we usually rush through the designing, speccing, and building processes without stopping to analyze if we are building the right things for our customer. We ship feature after feature out the door, and never return to make sure it is solving the problem or hitting our goals. Many Product Management roadmaps and processes don’t even include time to look at existing products and improve them.
The notion of Continuous Improvement has long been encouraged in software development practices, but what about Product Management? If we only improve the development side, we only solve half of the problem. We end up creating really fast and efficient processes to develop products that users end up hating.
In this hands on workshop, we'll learn how to use Continuous Improvement techniques during product development, especially during the discovery phase, to create products that achieve business goals and satisfy user needs. I'll introduce the concept of The Product Kata - a routine that will get your team identifying and solving problems like second nature. Then we'll learn how to put it into practice with an exercise in making "Kata Pizzas" for our customer. We'll wrap up with a discussion on good product strategy that allows the team to focus on learning and experimentation.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the problems with current Product Management practices that inhibit learning
  • Learn the Product Kata technique to adopt continuous learning principles in the team
  • Learn how to set effective Product Strategies that allow for experimentation and learning
  • Introduction to the Toyota Kata techniques and processes
  • Learn how to stop building useless features by taking the time to learn


Speakers
avatar for Melissa Perri

Melissa Perri

CEO, Product Management Leader, Executive Product Coach, Author, and Speaker, Produx Labs
Melissa Perri is the CEO of Produx Labs, a Product Management consultancy, and the author of “Escaping the Build Trap”. She believes the key to creating great products is growing great product leaders.Committed to that mission, she created the online school Product Institute... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am EDT
I2

9:00am EDT

The 5 Dimensions of great products (Valerio Zanini)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
To build great products, those that deliver an awesome experience that customers love, we need to broaden our view to the product experience as a whole, and not just the tangible aspects of a product. The traditional Software Development Life Cycle view is not enough, as it only focuses on the physical implementation (software development). In today’s world, to build a successful product, building a “thing” is no longer enough. You need to have a broader look that includes the whole customer experience around your product. Marketing, training, support, maintenance, partnerships with resellers, retail locations, a sales team can all be parts of your awesome product experience.
We need a new approach, to plan for both tangible and intangible aspects of a product experience. We need a 5D vision of the Product Experience. The 5 Dimensions of product management (DISCOVER, DESIGN, DEVELOP, DEPLOY, DELIVER) help us in creating a product from ideation to launch with a step-by-step guide across each phase. The framework organizes techniques that product managers can employ to create awesome products. This session presents the 5D Vision framework through a combination of lectures, group exercises, and real-life stories. Participants actively create and organize their 5D Vision framework in a collaborative exercise. Learn about Design Sprints, Customer Journey Maps, Prioritization techniques, Development and Testing, Launch plan, and Delivering success.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - What is a great product
  • - Going beyond building "the thing"
  • - Delivering a great customer experience
  • - The 5D Vision framework
  • - Using the right tools for each phase.
  • - Deployment is not the goal. Delivery is.
  • - What is Delivery? What is a great customer experience?
  • - How do we measure a great customer experience?
  • - Familiarity and context for several methodologies including Design Thinking/Design Sprints, Customer Journey Maps, Product Journey Maps, ATDD, MVP, Metrics-based delivery

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Valerio Zanini

Valerio Zanini

Digital Innovator, 5D Vision, LLC
A product innovator and digital leader, Valerio is passionate about creating products that customers love and developing the teams that make them a reality. An expert at bridging technology and business, he has led product and technology teams across a spectrum of industries, from... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am EDT
F3

9:00am EDT

Containerize your Enthusiasm: Docker & Containers as a path to Scaling Agile and DevOps (Anders Wallgren, Avantika Mathur)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
To be effective with agile development and with your DevOps implementation, you need to have solid technical practices. Container technology – such as Docker – can be incredibly instrumental in making your developers more agile, and help you scale your DevOps practices throughout the organization. On the other hand, when not implemented properly, container initiatives often introduce numerous challenges and requirements – particularly on your Operations teams – and could put your releases at risk.
In this talk, we will review the pre-requisites for creating an effective development and delivery pipeline powered by containers, to enable you to:
  • Empower your developers to be self-sufficient and wicked fast
  • Give your Ops team - and the business - confidence in what’s “inside the box”, so they can ensure the containers your developers produce can be managed in production, at scale.

Learning Outcomes:
  • The implications containers have on your DevOps processes and agile implementation
  • How to set up a delivery pipeline using containers and free tooling to dramatically increase your agile throughput
  • Special considerations for container-based application pipelines
  • How to incorporate the right checks and balances so your Operations team feels comfortable with what goes inside the containers
  • Some use cases along your pipeline that are prime for starting your container journey
  • Enabling containers at scale in production
  • Managing pipelines for container-based applications alongside “traditional” releases
  • Bonus: should you go all-in for continuous deployments? and how to get there

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Cody Hill

Cody Hill

Director of Technology, Platform9
Cody Hill is Director of Technology at Platform9. Prior to joining Platform9, Cody Hill was the Lead Cloud Architect at General Electric, where he built an enormous private cloud based on VMware vCloud Director spanning North America, Europe, and Asia. With more than 10 years of IT... Read More →
avatar for Avantika Mathur

Avantika Mathur

Product Manager, Electric Cloud
Avan (Avantika) Mathur is the Product Manager for ElectricFlow. In her previous role, Avan was the Global Technical Account Manager at Electric Cloud, helping large enterprises across Finserv, Retail and Embedded accelerate their DevOps adoption. Avan has worked with customers to... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am EDT
Wekiwa 6

9:00am EDT

Agile Transformations Beyond Teams (Bill DeVoe)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Agile transformations are usually focused on our IT organizations. As change agents, we've become adept at changing our software teams but we often experience resistance when talking with groups outside of IT - in particular HR and Finance. If your people systems use carrots and sticks and your company funds projects, not teams, your transformation won't see it's maximum benefit and may flounder. In this talk, I'll discuss how I've engaged HR and Finance teams to bring them along the agile path. We'll cover common challenges and missteps and how to address them. And I'll provide you with talking points and practical actions you can take immediately to start making changes to your whole company and effect transformations beyond your teams.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will understand the roots of resistance to agile from HR and Finance teams. They'll leave with talking points to bring to their departments and action plans on what they can do to start working with those departments to transform them to support an agile framework.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Bill DeVoe

Bill DeVoe

Principal Agile Evangelist, Velocity Partners
I've worked in agile shops as a developer in the trenches, a manager, product owner, coach, and agile evangelist. I have a diverse background and I've introduced or adapted agile processes with everything from Fortune 10 companies to small startups. My role at Velocity Partners encompasses... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am EDT
H2

9:00am EDT

Putting the Customer First in Enterprise Agile Frameworks (Christopher Ruch)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Where has the customer gone in large scale enterprise agile frameworks? Customer Collaboration is one of the main tenants of the Agile Manifesto, but it seems that have we lost touch with this concept as we have scaled agile into large organizations. If we look at the SAFe Big Picture, the customer is represented, but only at the end of the process consuming the solution. This talk explores how and why it is important to pull the customer to the beginning and middle of the process and not just the end. This isn't to pick on SAFe -- the customer doesn't appear at all on the graphics for Disciplined Agile, LeSS, and Nexus at all! The concepts and principles explored in this presentation are universal in any large enterprise and can, and should, be applied to to any framework.
Each of the main enterprise agile frameworks today (Disciplined Agile, SAFe, LeSS, Nexus, etc) have a graphic representation of their model, which present an inside-out view of how an enterprise is organized to delivery in an agile fashion. But what do our agile enterprises look like from the outside, from our customers' view point? As agile becomes widely adopted as the way of developing products, there is a growing gap with where new product development ideas are generated and how customer input is integrated into the agile process. Increasingly we are seeing organizations struggling because of a lack of an effective and experienced product management group and even experienced agile coaches not knowing how to effectively engage customers in their process.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - Understanding the role of the customer, the voice of the customer, and market validation of new product ideas
  • - How to define who your "customer" is
  • - How to identify opportunities for involving customer input into your enterprise agile process, taking into account different kinds of product development and a framework for identifying the right way to engage customers in your process
  • - Understanding how design thinking, lean start-up, and usability testing are powerful tools when combined with agile for engaging the customers

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Ruch

Christopher Ruch

Director, Agile Transformation, Summa
Agile and DevOps coach, trainer, and thought leader specializing in enterprise scale adoption and cultural change. I lead Summa's Transformation Practice.



Thursday August 10, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am EDT
Wekiwa 9&10

9:00am EDT

Agile Leadership – Understanding the “Power” of “Influence” (Kate Megaw, Anu Smalley)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
What would your team say about your leadership legacy. Did you lead with a legacy of power and fear or did you influence your team to do their best and grow. This session will look at the transition in leadership style that needs to happen so we have effective Agile Leadership for Self-Managing Teams.
Will your team happily jump through hoops for you? Do you have enough influence to encourage them to succeed, without telling them what to do?
This hands-on workshop session will use different exercises to explore the differences between these two styles of leadership. The session will also have you review your current leadership style and identify any areas you would like to work on.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Review your current leadership style and identify if you are more on the power or influence side?
  • Understand the difference between Power & Influence Based Leadership
  • How do you transition from “Power Based Leadership” to “Influence Based Leadership”?
  • What are the characteristics of a self-managing, self-organizing team?
  • What are the characteristics of a great Agile Leader?


Speakers
avatar for Kate Megaw

Kate Megaw

Certified Scrum Trainer & Agile Coach | President, Braintrust Consulting Group
Kate is the President of the Braintrust Consulting Group where she specializes in working with executives and C-level professionals as well as serving as an Agile Coach and Certified Scrum Trainer®. Before co-founding The Braintrust Consulting Group, Kate worked as a Project Manager... Read More →
avatar for Anu Smalley

Anu Smalley

Founder, Capala Consulting Group
Anu is President of Capala Consulting Group. Anu has extensive experience and success with large agile transformations, with clients such as Capital One, through training and coaching expertise. She specializes in leadership coaching and large group facilitation, having developed... Read More →



Thursday August 10, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am EDT
I3

9:00am EDT

Immersive (Dojo) and Enterprise Coaching 2.0 - Evolving Beyond Immersive Learning (Christopher Schwartz, Travis Klinker)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
As your company continues to evolve and transform, so do their needs.   Is your coaching strategy evolving to keep pace and stay relevant to meet those needs?  Is it even possible?  At Target we are continually evolving our immersive (Target Dojo) and enterprise/team coaching strategies to provide all levels of the company with the coaching needed to keep our transformation relevant in an incredibly fast changing technical landscape. 
In this presentation, we will share with you the steps Target is taking to ever evolve our coaching strategy to keep this pace.  We’ll walk you through how the Target Dojo is evolving from immersive learning on a single topic, to supporting holistic team coaching plans that ensure teams have access to specifically tailored learning needs that quickly change. We’ll talk about how we are exposing our internal coaching business as an external coaching service (to other companies!), not only because we think everyone benefits from shared learning, but also to accelerate our own internal rate of growth and development. Finally, we will talk through how we are leveraging our PLAD (Product, Lean, Agile, DevOps) model to ensure that we are delivering the RIGHT value, instead of merely accelerating the rate at which we deliver low value busywork.

Learning Outcomes:
  • • How do you evolve into an internal coaching business
  • • What are the components of a successful coaching plan
  • • How have we continuously refined coaching (Dojo and Enterprise) to stay effective in an ever changing environment
  • • How Target has evolved using PLAD (Product, Lean, Agile, DevOps) philosophy
  • • Why the PLAD is essential for a successful company transformation

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Schwartz

Christopher Schwartz

Lead Agile Coach, Target Corporation



Thursday August 10, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am EDT
I4

9:00am EDT

Accessibility: Is it another checkbox to be ticked? (Ann Mwangi)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Often as technologists we are carried away by the various ways of problem solving, that we forget about the presentation of the solution to the required people, in an accessible way.
It is easy to overlook the fact that even the best application cannot deliver value if its inaccessible to the users.
This talk will:
1. Define accessibility and analyse its importance
2. Determine various people who need to use the applications we build
3. Evaluate what a truly accessible application means
4. Describe how to build a really accessible application

5. Highlight various tools to measure accessibility
6. Evaluate some best practices to increase accessibility
7. Emphasise the intention of accessibility as opposed to crossing a threshold set by a tool

Learning Outcomes:
  • At the end of this session, each participant is able to:
  • Understand accessibility and why it is necessary
  • Evaluate ways to encourage accessibility while building applications
  • Assess ways to encourage all the members of a team to think about accessibility while building all the parts of an application


Speakers
avatar for Ann Mwangi

Ann Mwangi

Thoughtworks
Am a software developer and consultant. I love discussing how to make applications more accessible. I also love talking about cloud infrastructure and finding new ways to make more secure cloud architectures.


Thursday August 10, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am EDT
H1

9:45am EDT

From manifesto to mainstream and beyond - reading the entrails of the user story (Seb Rose)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Lightweight methods started appearing in response to observed problems in software development organisations. The umbrella 'agile' term was coined during a small meeting at a ski resort in 2000 and has since gone on to become a common, if not predominant, approach throughout the industry. Along the way things have changed - this was both understandable and necessary - but many of the important motivations have been lost and some unhelpful dogma has accumulated.
In this session we'll focus on the user story, from its early articulation as a lightweight technique to defer detailed analysis through to its current existence as a rigid catechism. We'll briefly consider what we've lost and what we've gained through planning poker, INVEST, and various story templates. By charting the evolution of the user story, in conjunction with the broader trajectory of 'agile', I will infer a few of the possible futures of agile.
And, as an outcome, I hope to stimulate further discussion that might suggest some alternative outcomes for the future.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Recall why agile happened in the first place
  • Refresh our knowledge of user stories (and related practices)
  • See parallels between the evolution of user stories and the evolution of agile methods
  • Discuss the likely trajectory of stories (and by extension agile)
  • Suggest alternative trajectories, and how they might be achieved

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Seb Rose

Seb Rose

Director, Cucumber Limited
I have been involved in the full development lifecycle with experience that ranges from Architecture to Support, from BASIC to Ruby. I'm a partner in Cucumber Limited, who help teams adopt and refine their agile practices, with a particular focus on collaboration, BDD and automated... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 9:45am - 10:15am EDT
Wekiwa 3&4

10:45am EDT

Clarifying Development Decision-Making with Design Challenges (Michael Feathers)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Whenever we design software we face competing concerns. We have to tradeoff ease of implementation, concision, maintainability, and understandability. Often we don't do this consciously, we just sit down and do the work. Each of us bring our development background - the things we've learned or read over the years. If we want to have a discussion about which way is better, it often becomes an appeal to our experiences, the sources we've learned from, or our intuition.
This session presents the practice of using Design Challenges as a way of using framing questions to evaluate code. Design Challenges move beyond design principles by stimulating thought about the ramification of various structural choices.

Learning Outcomes:
  • You will learn now to apply a set of design challenges to critique code and design in a non-confrontational way. You will also learn how to brainstorm new design challenges, apply them in practice,and leverage them to arrive at better design through team conversation.


Speakers
avatar for Michael Feathers

Michael Feathers

Chief Architect, Globant
Michael Feathers is Chief Architect of Globant, and the Founder and Director of R7K Research & Conveyance. Prior to joining Globant and forming R7K, Michael was the Chief Scientist of Obtiva and a consultant with Object Mentor International. Over the past 20 years he has consulted... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
Wekiwa 9&10

10:45am EDT

Unit Test Abstraction: Crafting Sustainable Tests (Jeff Langr)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Don't end up twirling down the bad-test death spiral! Coding unit tests is an investment, and if you're not careful, it will all be for naught: Many teams quickly built a significant number of unit tests, only to find out that the low quality of the tests pushes them into disuse, then to disrepair/dysfunction, and ultimately to discarded.
Part of sustaining TDD or "test-after development" (TAD) unit testing is recognizing that the tests must play a role as documentation on the behaviors of the system under test. In this hands-on workshop, we'll focus on applying the notion of abstraction--amplifying essential elements and suppressing irrelevant details--to unit tests. You'll learn to sniff out a couple handfuls of test smells that relate to poor test abstraction. You'll work on eliminating these smells to create tests that are literary and immediately obvious. (And you'll hear a bit about why this pays off.)
You'll find codebases for this workshop in Java and C#. Download now from GitHub and get ready to clean up! And don't forget to bring a laptop to the session. Well, it might be ok to forget your laptop, as long as you're ok with pairing with someone else.

Learning Outcomes:
  • the value of emphasizing abstraction in tests
  • how to recognize smells in tests
  • how to eliminate smells from tests
  • how to use tests as entry points for understanding system behaviors
  • how to improve test readability through pairing

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Langr

Jeff Langr

Owner, Langr Software Solutions, Inc.
Jeff Langr has been professionally building software for over a third century. He is a contributor to Clean Code and the author of 5 books on software development: Pragmatic Unit Testing in Java 8 with JUnit, Modern C++ Programming with Test-Driven Development, Agile in a Flash, Agile... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
H3

10:45am EDT

CANCELLED: Defining the MVP for an Agile Continuous Deployment Strategy (Elizabeth Woodward)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Come learn how you can use the concepts of Minimum Viable Products (MVPs) and build-measure-learn feedback loops to focus your team’s continuous improvement efforts. Popularized by Lean Startup, an MVP is a version of a new product that uses the least amount of effort to gather a maximum amount of validated learning that can help with decisions about further investment. You’ll have a chance to establish continuous improvement backlog along with a tailored continuous improvement MVP that can potentially take your team from being “somewhat agile” to “agile with continuous deployment.”
This workshop begins with a quick overview of Lean Startup concepts and introduces the case study team that serves as the example referenced after each hands-on activity. Working as part of a small group, you will focus on a “Think Big, Start Small” strategy. You will establish a tailored full continuous deployment pipeline, identify desirable principles and practices for the different stages of the pipeline and identify the tooling required to support targeted practices. From there, you will create a rank-ordered backlog and establish an MVP. We will discuss setting up your Build-Measure-Learn loop, establishing your “value hypothesis,” defining your approach for baselining and measuring your experiment and, given examples, formulating decisions as to whether to “pivot or persevere.”

Learning Outcomes:
  • Establish a "to be" state for a continuous delivery pipeline, including stages, principles and practices and technology and tooling
  • Create a rank-ordered continuous improvement backlog that can take your team from agile to continuous deployment
  • Select a Minimum Viable Product from a rank-ordered continuous improvement backlog
  • Baseline and measure improvements that serve as the MVP for your continuous improvement backlog

Attachments:


Thursday August 10, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
F2

10:45am EDT

Leading Thinking People (Tim Ottinger)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Humanity has centuries of experience leading laborers and clerks, but what do we know about leading people who think for a living?
  • How can we help people have innovative new ideas?
  • Are we keeping our people too busy to think?
  • How can we encourage a voracious appetite for learning?
  • How do we help the team stay mentally fresh and energetic all day long?
  • Can we really learn to "work smarter"?
In this session, you will learn ways to lead your thinking people by helping them to learn more actively, manage their mental energy, and find ways to consistently produce better results.
We will use simulations, facts, games, and questions to explore getting the best outcomes for our organizations and our customers, instead of getting the most work out of each individual.
We will discover changes that we can make in our work environment which will begin to pay back immediately (with compound interest).
Come and learn a few ways to "give them the environment and support they need" (agile manifesto).

Learning Outcomes:
  • We will learn to appreciate and cultivate mindset and skill for leading people whose work is primarily intellectual.
  • We will change the metaphors used to describe the work of teams.
  • You will learn how to help people around you think more clearly, longer, and more often.
  • We will consider how to change our system of work so that we can "provide the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the work done" (Agile Manifesto).

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Tim Ottinger

Tim Ottinger

Anzeneer, Industrial Logic
Tim is a long-time programmer (since 1979), reviewer, speaker, writer. He has been active in many of the big changes in software over the past 36 years (including Design Patterns, Object-Oriented Design, and Agile software development). In addition to his contributions in "Clean... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
Wekiwa 6

10:45am EDT

Mastering self-organization (Hendrik Esser)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Self-organization is one of the fundamental aspects of agile organizations. Yet it is a challenge and there are lots of myths around it.
Some people say: "With self-organization, I lose control totally". Others are happy as they think "Wow! This means I can all do it my way". 
The truth is - of course - somewhere in the middle: self-organization is still a form of organization. That means, that all essential problems, that organizations need to cope with, need to be also coped with in organizational eco-systems that are stronger based on self-organization.

But how? And to what extent? And how to achieve a good balance between the essential organizational needs of alignment and autonomy.
In this talk we will look at self-organization from different angles. Based on my 20 years of SW development leadership experience at Ericsson, one of the world's largest SW companies with more than 20,000 Developers, I will share what we have discussed, experimented and learned in this area.

Learning Outcomes:
  • See organization and self-organization from different perspectives
  • Understand the challange of balancing alignment and autonomy
  • Hear about real-world examples of how this challenge can be mastered
  • Inspiration on things you can try in your own organization.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Hendrik Esser

Hendrik Esser

Growing up in the 1980s I was a passionate computer game developer during my school and study times. After getting my diploma in Electrical engineering I started at Ericsson in 1994 as aSW developer. From 1996 I worked in project management roles. Since 2000 I am working as a manager... Read More →



Thursday August 10, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
F4

10:45am EDT

Growing Internal Trainers and Coaches (Karen Greaves, Kelley Cooper)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
If you want to transform a large organization with agile, you need to build an internal competency for training and coaching. Join us as we share our story of how a large global organization grew their ability to provide in house agile training and coaching, by working with two external agile coaches. We will also share the impact on the organisation as a whole of embarking on this learning journey, and how it has resulted in organisational structure changes.
You will hear from one of the internal agile coaches who has now trained hundreds of Product Owners across her organisation about her journey, and from one of the external coaches about the approach they used, which you could apply to growing your own coaches and trainers.

Learning Outcomes:
  • The benefits of internal coaches and trainers vs external providers
  • Understand an effective pattern for growing trainers and coaches within your organization
  • Know what things to watch out for in an internal agile coaching team
  • Learn how training can unite previously silo'ed teams
  • Understand the importance of a training and coaching focus in an agile organization

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Kelley Cooper

Kelley Cooper

Agile Evangelist, ACI Worldwide
Is herding cats on PCP a recognized job title? If so, that's me! Implementing agile in a large corporation of 2000+ product development ninjas is as challenging and rewarding as it gets. I’m eager to share our hits (and misses) as we continue our journey to agile nirvana!
avatar for Karen Greaves

Karen Greaves

Agile Coach, Growing Agile
I love meeting new people so come introduce yourself. Check out www.growingagile.co.nz to see what I look like, or just listen for the loudest person in the room :)


Thursday August 10, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
I2
  Learning, Talk

10:45am EDT

The Build That Cried Broken: Building Trust in Your Continuous Integration Tests (Angie Jones)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
There’s a famous Aesop Fable titled “The Boy Who Cried Wolf”. As the story goes, a young shepherd-boy would declare that a wolf was coming in an effort to alarm the villagers who were concerned for their sheep. The boy got a reaction from the villagers the first three or four times he did this, but the villagers eventually became hip to his game and disregarded his future alarms. One day, a wolf really was coming and when the boy tried to alert the villagers, none of them paid him any attention. The sheep, of course, perished.
For many teams, their continuous integration builds have become just like this young shepherd-boy. They are crying “Broken! Broken!” and in a state of panic, team members assess the build. Yet, time and time again, they find that the application is working but that the tests are faulty and giving false alarms. Eventually, no one pays attention to the alerts anymore and have lost faith in what was supposed to be a very important indicator.
Let me help you save the sheep...or in your case, the quality of your application.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to build stability within your continuous integration tests
  • Tips for managing tests that are failing with just cause
  • How to influence the perception of the credibility of the tests among stakeholders

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Angie Jones

Angie Jones

Automation Architect, Senior Developer Advocate at Applitools (USA)
Angie Jones is a Senior Developer Advocate who specializes in test automation strategies and techniques. She shares her wealth of knowledge by speaking and teaching at software conferences all over the world, writing tutorials and technical articles on angiejones.tech, and leading... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
F1

10:45am EDT

Spreading the Love: 8 Ways to Magnify the Impact of User Research (Elizabeth Ayer)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Sometimes great people can do great work, and it just doesn’t have much effect on the organization.
This was the case at Redgate Software two years ago, when UX and product management were the Keepers of the Customer. Since then, we've switched to a model where product development teams themselves are responsible for the research that powers their decisions. Not only has this improved developer engagement, it's also delivered for the business through products that are much better aligned with users’ needs.
We haven’t stopped there, though, because the whole business needs to rally around that shared insight. Other organisations have used personas to great effect, but we have found it more effective to bring the actual experiences of our users (and non-users) to the discussions.
This talk will explore the challenges of bringing customers’ experience into everyday decision-making, including making the time and space to learn. We’ll talk about some overall strategies that have worked for us and some that didn’t!
In particular, we'll go through examples of:
4 proven approaches to help whole teams really engage
4 ways to ensure customer knowledge flows through to business stakeholders
You will leave this session with a bundle of ideas how to make your customer research really deliver.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand a model of change to embed the users at the heart of products and services
  • Identify the time and skills challenges that prevent the ‘right’ people from doing research
  • Get fresh ideas for supporting teams in taking on customer research
  • Gain tools for working out how to maximise business benefit of customer contact

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Ayer

Elizabeth Ayer

Product Manager, 18F
Who are you ?I'm the product lady who had to retire her battle cry of "Shippit!" after too many people misunderstood the intent. They can't take "early and continuous delivery of valuable software" away from me, though!As a product team leader, I have tripped and recovered my way... Read More →



Thursday August 10, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm EDT
H2

2:00pm EDT

IT Risk Management Framework - The missing jigsaw piece in your Agile Transformation (Chris Matts, Tony Grout)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
In order for a system to be effective, the needs of everyone involved need to be met. There are two key needs that are not met by most Agile Transformations. The needs of an executive to demonstrate control to regulatory bodies and shareholders, and the needs of Audit and Assurance to demonstrate that investments are "Safe to Fail". Come to this interactive experience report where we will describe our journey introducing an agile IT Risk Management Framework to one of the oldest and largest banks in the world. The experience report includes two training sessions we use to explain the why and the how of the IT Risk Management Framework.
When we started our journey, everyone expected us to implement a process framework like SAFe, LESS or DAD. Instead we implemented an agile IT Risk Management Framework that allows the most appropriate process frameworks to be adopted for the right context in such large organisations.
In this session, we will explain:
1. What is an IT Risk Management Framework.
2. How it was implemented in Organisation Wide Policy in a traditional bank.
3. Our experience rolling it out across twenty thousand people.
4. The feedback so far
5. Why an IT Risk Management Framework helps with Cultural Change.
6. Your next steps to implementing an IT Risk Management Framework of your own.

Learning Outcomes:
  • You will learn why and how to implement an agile IT Risk Management Framework. We will focus on the details that are useful to practitioners but boring for people keen to sell agile. Learn how we sold the Framework to Executives. Learn how we alleviated the fears of colleagues. Learn how we developed the skills of colleagues in Assurance and Audit. Learn how to convert risk averse process frameworks into liberating risk management frameworks.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Tony Grout

Tony Grout

Atlassian
Hey, I would love to hear about how you're finding operating agility in large or fast growing organisations. Curious to hear what's not worked more so than what has and I'll share the same.
avatar for Chris Matts

Chris Matts

Left Back, Emergent Behaviour
Talk to me about creating a better workplace for our children.I co-created the GIVEN-WHEN-THEN format, discovered real options, staff liquidity (Skills Matrix), and Capacity Planning (Delivery Mapping).


Thursday August 10, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
I2

2:00pm EDT

Value Every 2 Weeks with Improvement Slicing and Incremental Improvement Boards (Jake Calabrese)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Organizations and departments outside of software are being driven to adopt agile approaches to keep up with information technology and competitors. They are often get stuck trying to apply practices that aren’t a fit for them. We should be focused on the organizations work, purpose, flow of value, and incrementally improving that flow rather than on practices that are not effective. In this session, we will look at the ways organizations view and structure their work, common impediments to the flow of value, and potential improvement ideas we can inject to mitigate impediments.
We will explore an Incremental Improvement Board to make improvements transparent. The Board includes provisions where we decouple (a) Improvement Ideas, (b), refinement and research of improvement ideas, and (c) actions that can be taken to incrementally improve - which is the goal! We will work through examples and exercises to create a Board for each attendee and discuss options to slice improvements into actionable 2-week chunks. To make it fun, we will use the sample improvement: “make all meetings effective, efficient, and waste free!” Of course, this can’t be done in 2-weeks, but researching it for 6-months is absurd! Instead, as with all improvements, we want to slice it into actionable 2-week chunks that can be used to incrementally improve and learn.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Assess how your organization views and structures work.
  • Understand and practice a 5-step approach to incremental improvement for agile companies.
  • Create and leave with an incremental improvement board with actionable improvements.
  • Learn steps to slice improvement ideas into less than 2 week pieces of work.
  • Understand how to inject impediments will small improvements to improve.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jake Calabrese

Jake Calabrese

Leadership & Team Coach & Trainer, Agile For All
Jake Calabrese is a coach, trainer, and coach-consultant working to help organizations meet the promise of agile by going beyond agile practices to address culture challenges and help teams and leaders reach and maintain high performance. He has unique expertise as an Organization... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
I4

2:00pm EDT

Up a creek without a paddle: MacGyver's guide to coaching (Rita Emmons)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
MacGyver, an 80’s era action adventure TV hero, was famously known for his creative and inventive use of common items to escape dangerous situations. Agile coaching can be its own kind of adventure. Building trust in a new environment where the culture is unknown, and there are few available and familiar resources, can be a challenge. Jumping into a coaching role can be intimidating, overwhelming, and exciting. With books, blogs, and our ability to ‘Google’ anything, there is a wealth of information on coaching methods, practices, and approaches available at our fingertips to read, learn, and experiment. However, imagine none of that was available to you. No internet. No training manuals. Just you, your experience, and a little creativity.

In this exercise of mental muscle, we’ll MacGyver a coaching toolkit comprised of only your noggin, and random (un)common items. Can a jar of marbles and a dirty sock help you build trust? How can you use some rope and a baseball card to foster high performing teams? Will a picture of an elderly man and a coloring book provide growth opportunities as a coach? Stay tuned and we will find out…

Learning Outcomes:
  • The importance of trust when you are an 'alien' to the team
  • Change the conversation to ask pwoerful questions that garner thoughful reflective outcomes
  • Techniques to refine disciple and embrace the opportunity of failure
  • Building self-awareness to cultivate personal growth


Speakers
avatar for Rita Emmons

Rita Emmons

Senior Consultant, Cardinal Solutions
With over 15 years of experience, Rita Emmons has worked on a myriad of projects as a Business Analyst and Quality Analyst in a broad range of industries including aviation, insurance, healthcare, and retail. Transitioning into a Scrum Master role invigorated her passion for empowering... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
Wekiwa 5

2:00pm EDT

Dynamic Reteaming: The Art & Wisdom of Changing Teams (Heidi Helfand)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
When your team compositions change it doesn't mean you're doing it wrong - it could be the secret to your success. Changing teams can help reduce the risk of attrition, learning & career stagnation, and the development of knowledge silos. I'll share original case studies from well known companies that enable dynamic change to their teams propelled by retrospectives and other agile, humanistic practices. In this talk, you'll learn tips and tricks for building a sustainable company by changing teams - whether it's by growing and splitting teams, merging teams, seeding teams, adding new people across multiple teams and more. I'll also share reteaming antipatterns and what not to do.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn why changing teams and roles can help you retain team members and avoid learning & career stagnation.
  • Understand how reteaming helps you build a sustainable company by spreading critical information across your teams and encouraging the retention of knowledge inside your company.
  • Learn how to reteam, including how and when to split teams, merge teams, strategies for managing high growth and doubling of teams, rotating team members & beneficial siloing of teams.
  • Hear about reteaming antipatterns - what not to do and why.
  • Find out the deliberate community building and interpersonal practices you can do in your company to facilitate and amplify reteaming.
  • It's inevitable: people come and go from your company. Get good at reteaming!

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for HEIDI HELFAND

HEIDI HELFAND

Director of Product & Technology Excellence, Procore Technologies
Heidi Helfand is author of the book Dynamic Reteaming. She coaches software development teams using practical, people-focused techniques, with the goal of building resilient organizations as they double and triple in size. Heidi is currently Director of Product & Technology Excellence... Read More →



Thursday August 10, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
H2

2:00pm EDT

Scaffolding a legacy app with BDD scenarios using SpecFlow/Cucumber (Gaspar Nagy)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Do you remember your childhood when your mom or an older story teller pronounced the most interesting words in the world? “Once upon a time…” Let me be now your story teller, listen to my story about a legacy app, a painful problem, the search for the solution and the lucky outcome.
No, no, this is not the story about a new green field project where everything is so clear. However, even in this story there is a master builder, who shows the developers how to scaffold the legacy app with BDD scenarios using SpecFlow or Cucumber and everything will be all right in the end. Let me tell you about different strategies, collaboration and testing patterns that can be followed in such a renovation-like situation.
So, are you ready...? “Once upon a time there was a company where…” To be continued at my session...

Learning Outcomes:
  • Is it possible to introduce BDD for legacy projects?
  • What are the different strategies, collaboration and testing patterns that can be followed?
  • How can we address complex test automation problems by making small steps and using temporary infrastructures?
  • How to address change requests and bugs? What are the differences?
  • How to balance the different kinds of tests to get to the "testing pyramid" model?

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Gaspar Nagy

Gaspar Nagy

coach, trainer and BDD addict, Spec Solutions
I am the creator and main contributor of SpecFlow, regular conference speaker, blogger (http://gasparnagy.com), editor of the BDD Addict monthly newsletter (http://bddaddict.com), and co-author of the book "BDD Books: Discovery - Explore behaviour using Examples" (http://bddbooks.com... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
Wekiwa 7&8

2:00pm EDT

CD for DBs: Database Deployment Strategies (Chris Fulton)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
As organizations invest in DevOps to release more frequently, there’s a need to treat the database tier as an integral part of your automated delivery pipeline – to build, test and deploy database changes just like any other part of your application.
However, databases (particularly RDBMS) are different from source code, and pose unique challenges to Continuous Delivery - especially in the context of deployments.
Often, code changes require updating or migrating the database before the application can be deployed. A deployment method that works for installing a small database or a green-field application may not be suitable for industrial-scale databases. Updating the database can be more demanding than updating the app layer: database changes are more difficult to test, and rollbacks are harder. Furthermore, for organizations who strive to minimize service interruption to end users, database updates with no-downtime are a laborious operation.
Your DB stores the most mission-critical and sensitive data of your organization (transaction data, business data, user information, etc.). As you update your database, you’d want to ensure data integrity, ACID, data retention, and have a solid rollback strategy - in case things go wrong …
This talk covers strategies for database deployments and rollbacks.

Learning Outcomes:
  • • Patterns and best practices for reliably deploying databases as part of your CD pipeline
  • • Tips for deploying Relational databases (with/without schema changes) vs. NoSQL data stores
  • • How to safely rollback database code
  • • How to ensure data integrity
  • • Best practices for handling advanced scenarios and back-end processes, such as scheduled tasks, ETL routines, replication architecture, linked databases across distributed infrastructure, and more
  • • How to handle legacy database, alongside more modern data management solutions


Speakers
CF

Chris Fulton

Global Technical Account Manager, Electric Cloud


Thursday August 10, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
F3

2:00pm EDT

Rising above Failure: An Interactive Case Study in Scaling Agile (Steve Martin)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
In my experience, no one starts an Agile based initiative wanting to fail. But, sometimes there are extenuating circumstances that challenge even the best of us. The trick is to learn and remain open from the failure, no matter how painful they may be at the time. While it can be challenging and somewhat humbling, continuous improvement and growth can happen from failure.
In this interactive workshop, we’ll start out quickly reviewing some of the latest research related to failure, along with some steps to take to address them. We’ll then spend most of the time discussing a real-world failure for a large program involving scaling Agile. There were over 150 people, more than 10 teams, budget in $10s of millions, and multiple technologies.
We’ll present this in a "case study" format, where you’ll get the background of the situation, and then asked what would you do. Next, steps taken and outcomes from the actual engagement will be shared – especially on what not to do. We’ll focus on the failure modes, which ones we addressed, which ones we did not, and what happened.
Turn from the perceived “dark side” of failure. Make failure a learning opportunity to grow stronger and to become more aware.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Be able to recognize common failure modes and learn some steps to address them
  • Apply failure mode learnings to a scaling Agile "case study"
  • Leave with lessons learned of failed Agile scaling that can be used in training sessions at the attendee's organization

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Steve Martin

Steve Martin

Founder and Principal Consultant, Cottage Street Consulting
With 20+ years’ experience, Steve is an Enterprise Agile Consultant with a solid history of helping his clients produce tangible results by applying Agile and Lean Startup concepts throughout organizations. He is a seasoned mentor, coach, facilitator, and trainer at all levels... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
H1

2:00pm EDT

What’s in your role? Elevating the Scrum Master role at Capital One (Marie Dingess, Jennifer Honermann)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
What if your Agile Transformation continued to keep pace with rapidly evolving tools and processes but one of the key roles for driving agile continuous improvement did not? That’s the situation we found ourselves in at Capital One as we shifted to an engineering mindset and innovation culture that demanded more than basic scrum facilitation out of our Agile practitioners.
This talk will identify key symptoms to look for in determining when this role needs a reboot and additional support in their growth. We will share our approach to rethinking the role beyond the Scrum Guide. Once we had a new vision for the role, we focused on understanding what our Scrum Masters would need to achieve it. We will share lessons learned of how we rallied leaders across a diverse enterprise to provide clarity in role growth, training, recruiting, and communities to strengthen our Scrum Masters and improve our organizational agility.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will learn the complexities of raising expectations for Scrum Masters in a way that:
  • encourages growth in a positive manner
  • allows department lines some level of autonomy
  • strengthens the Scrum Master community
  • involves everyone (Leadership, People Managers, Scrum Masters, Engineers)

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Marie Dingess

Marie Dingess

Agile Coach, Capital One
avatar for Jennifer Honermann

Jennifer Honermann

Director, Agile Delivery and Coaching, Capital One
I guide the internal agile practice and coaches in my division at Capital One. I love the potential of what we are trying to accomplish and the freedom to test and learn. That said, it's not been easy. I would like to connect with internal coaches to share lessons learned! We... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
F4

2:00pm EDT

Accelerating Good Decisions: Using Kanban for Distributed Cognition (Trent Hone)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
75 years ago, the challenges of combat in the South Pacific were exceeding the U.S. Navy’s decision-making capabilities. Ship captains were overwhelmed with data from radars, radios and other sources. They could not make sense of their work fast enough. Today, many of us are faced with the same challenge: we have too much data and too little actionable information.
The U.S Navy’s revolutionary solution was the Combat Information Center (CIC). It distributed the cognitive load using visual tools, created a clear model of the work, and enabled faster decision-making. Effective Kanban systems accomplish the same goal, reducing our individual cognitive load while simultaneously enabling more effective decision-making across the system. I’ll describe this history, define how distributed cognition works, and give you specific ideas for how to accelerate effective decisions with your Kanban system.
Outline:
  • Introduction of Concepts: Kanban & Distributed Cognition
  • The U.S. Navy's Situation
    • Challenges after Pearl Harbor
    • The Need to Fight at Night
    • Limitations of Early Radar Systems
    • The Solution: the Combat Information Center (CIC)
    • Why the CIC Worked and How it Relates to Our Situation Today
  • Distributed Cognition
    • What is it?
    • What are the Essential Components of it?
    • What Benefits does it Provide?
  • Kanban
    • What is Kanban?
    • What is the Kanban Method?
  • How does Kanban Enabled Distributed Cognition
    • Example: Kanban Dinner Planning
    • Making Policies Explicit
    • Creating a Pull System
    • Visualization
    • Work In Progress Limits
    • Classes of Service
    • Capacity Allocation
  • Summary
    • How can this Help You?
    • What can You do Tomorrow?

Learning Outcomes:
  • Better understanding of how to move beyond visualizing work and towards creating a shared system of knowledge that is more than the sum of the whole.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Trent Hone

Trent Hone

Managing Consultant, Excella
Trent Hone is a Managing Consultant with Excella Consulting and an award-winning naval historian. He works with software and IT organizations to improve their art of practice, increase effectiveness, and accelerate learning. He has helped dozens of government and commercial teams... Read More →



Thursday August 10, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
Wekiwa 1&2

2:00pm EDT

For a fresh perspective on team leadership look to the drummer. What? (john ryskowski)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Assume you have no authority, no control over anyone or anything, and you need to inspire members to perform as never before. Who are you? “Oh, you must be the drummer, set your kit up next to the piano dude.”
When searching for helpful techniques to improve our leadership skills, sometimes the best place to look is to a completely unrelated field. Did you know the techniques used by a big band drummer parallel those of a successful team leader?
On the surface the big band drummer is just another “side-man” without any authority or control. Once the music starts the drummer can invoke confidence and inspire individual members and the entire band to play like never before.
This session will include live demonstrations of the techniques drummers use to support the band in their goal to sound great. An actual big band chart will be played then broken down one section at a time. As the drumming techniques are revealed, so are opportunities to realize new perspectives on team leadership, that’s where you come in.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Specific leadership techniques and lessons learned from an unrelated field
  • Self-discovered insights into leadership without power
  • Inspiration and renewed energy to get back and lead
  • Identify conference attendees with whom to discuss further thoughts on leadership without power

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for john ryskowski

john ryskowski

President, JFR Consulting
Q: What makes all the hardware and software in an Apple store come to life? A: Relevant conversations The problem always boils down to the people, but within those people lies the solution. The solution cannot start without a conversation with the right people in the same room... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
H4

2:00pm EDT

CANCELLED: Dark Learning: An Agile Approach to Enterprise Learning (Elizabeth Woodward)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
A culture of learning and continuous improvement is central to an agile mindset. Yet, when it comes to transferring knowledge, skills and behaviors for new solutions to employees, partners and customers, organizations often address the needs after development is complete. High-performing organizations, in contrast, are not “developing training using agile methods” after delivery. They are reconsidering what enterprise training means and recasting it in the light of “enablement.” Their focus is on more transparently enabling the acquisition and adoption of desired knowledge, skills and behaviors.
“Dark Learning” is an agile approach to enterprise learning or--more accurately--enterprise enablement. It provides a unified view of key disruptions taking place in the field of enterprise learning--micro-learning, social, mobile, personalization, contextualization, video, and analytics-driven decision-making--as a strategy for increasing enterprise agility towards a continuous delivery model.
This session introduces the current state of enterprise learning, provides an overview of the disruptions taking place in the field of enterprise learning and introduces Dark Learning as a shift in mindset that enables high-performers to get to market more quickly, reduce costs associated with traditional learning and increase the quality of overall solutions delivered by the enterprise.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Recognize ways in which traditional learning approaches are out of alignment with Agile principles and approaches, and hinder enterprise agility as a result.
  • Describe how disruptors in the field of enterprise learning are a reflection Agile, Lean, Continuous Delivery, DevOps and other shifts in software development
  • Identify the key "brain shifts" of Dark Learning and how they can help improve enterprise agility.
  • Identify practical actions that you can take to more transparently transfer knowledge, skills and behaviors to colleagues, partners and customers.

Attachments:


Thursday August 10, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
Wekiwa 6

2:00pm EDT

Impact Mapping - How to Make Value-Driven Prioritization a Reality (Mathias Eifert)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a way to combine quantified business goals, direct traceability from goals to features, surfacing of value assumptions, cause-and-effect analysis, design thinking and visual facilitation in a single approach?
There is! Impact Maps support multiple stakeholders in gaining consensus on which features or actions are most useful to help us achieve an organizational goal. In the process, we agree what needs to be accomplished, create shared understanding of possible solutions, decide which user groups or personas to target first, derive epics/user stories, identify the underlying assumptions that need to be validated using testable hypotheses, and determine leading indicators to get early feedback whether we are moving in the right direction.
In this workshop, we will look at how Impact Maps can help ensure business value, how to build one with a group of stakeholders, and how to get the most out of it. Best of all, you will create your own sample map so you will walk away with hands-on experience!

Learning Outcomes:
  • - Understand how Impact Maps can help with ensuring that Agile projects actually create value.
  • - Get an overview of how to construct an Impact Map with your stakeholders in a structured brainstorming session.
  • - Interpret the map to derive epics/user stories, metrics and testable hypotheses.
  • - Reflect on the presented concepts by building a sample map together with the other attendees

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Mathias Eifert

Mathias Eifert

Lean/Agile Coach and Managing Consultant, Excella
I'm an Agile pragmatists with a strong interest in first principles over specific frameworks. I believe Agile is primarily a way to manage uncertainty and the biggest uncertainty is in figuring out the "right thing" to focus our efforts on, so much of my coaching is around goal-centered... Read More →



Thursday August 10, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm EDT
F1

3:45pm EDT

What I've learned from 10+ years of evaluating Agile consultants and coaches (Jason Yip)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Agile is mainstream enough that the demand for Agile consultants and coaches is high. High demand attracts many people who lack relevant practical experience or only know how to practice, but don't know how to consult or coach. Organizations need effective ways to filter good candidates from bad. On the other side, candidates want to know what it takes to be considered good. I will share several patterns of selection approaches based on my experiences at Spotify and ThoughtWorks..

Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn about 9 different roles that consultant and coaches may take
  • Learn archetypes of bad Agile consultant / coaches vs archetypes of effective Agile consultant / coaches
  • Learn about specific recruiting patterns such as how to determine evaluation criteria and different kinds of auditions (retrospectives, role-play)
  • Learn about specific recruiting anti-patterns where candidates can seem good but probably can't perform

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jason Yip

Jason Yip

Agile Coach, Spotify
Extreme Programming, Toyota / Lean, organisational design



Thursday August 10, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
F2

3:45pm EDT

Self-Forming Teams: A Facilitator's Guide to Transforming the Organization and Culture (Adam Hsu, Gabe Abella)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
The term 'self-organizing' is mentioned five times in the Scrum Guide, and if you Google the term you will be presented with a myriad of articles extolling the virtues and benefits of having teams self-organize by allowing them to choose how to accomplish the work. However, you won't find many articles that describe in detail how to help teams begin to form into those extraordinary self-organizing teams. Reality check: Most organizations just starting to transform begin by allowing management to assign people to specific teams based on the notion that people are not capable of self-forming into cross-functional teams with the right skillsets. This is a missed opportunity to dramatically shift the culture by establishing trust and empowerment. Come and learn the techniques to facilitate a team self-formation event so that you can transform your organization into a self-organizing culture no matter where you are in your journey.

Learning Outcomes:
  • In this dynamic simulation workshop attendees will learn the techniques to facilitate a team self-formation event, which will allow people to self-select into cross-functional teams that are fully capable of delivering features for their Product Owners. The goal is to teach attendees how to transform typically large traditional delivery organizations into scaled scrum (or other agile framework) teams.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Gabe Abella

Gabe Abella

Organizational Coach, JPMorgan Chase & Co.
avatar for Adam Hsu

Adam Hsu

Organizational Coach, JPMorgan Chase
Adam Hsu is member of a team of coaches in Global Technology at JPMorgan Chase focused on enabling organizational and business agility at every level of the organization. Adam's approach to coaching is grounded in the principles of Socio-Technical Systems theory with a focus on emergent... Read More →



Thursday August 10, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
Wekiwa 6

3:45pm EDT

Data is my co-pilot, effective ways to manage product portfolios using data... (Adam Yuret)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
If we just leave teams alone, we’ll succeed!
If people just did Scrum right, we’d succeed!
Code craftsmanship will save us!
There’s a growing movement against “agile”. Team-focused approaches repeatedly fail to deliver meaningful organizational change. Frustrated agile coaches blame the client for lacking ‘courage’ to really commit to agile values. Clients frustrated with lack of 'real world' pragmatism from agilists.
Effective data-driven approaches to change have a more significant impact than shouting at leaders and product organizations about “doing agile right” and a big piece of the puzzle has been missing for some time.
That missing piece is the product. The product is what we build to delight the customer who then remunerates us for our efforts in hopes we’ll continue delighting them.
Product portfolio management is foremost about understanding ways to maximize returns on a limited number of investments available to our organizations. In order to do that we need to understand what is possible and make hard choices about what not to build.
Many approaches to discovery have emerged in the Lean and Agile communities. Don Reinertsen’s second-generation lean product development has offered some great answers to making value-based decisions regarding portfolio investments while understanding how to effectively optimize flow through a delivery system.
Come to this session and learn how to use analytical approaches to understanding value and communicating strategy to change what has long been an adversarial relationship between business and IT into a collaborative one where everyone wins.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to take an oblique analytical approach to changing organizational culture.
  • How to use 2nd Generation Lean Product Development principles and approaches to create the great agile organizations/teams they're seeking.
  • How to use probabilistic forecasting to understand the limited capability their organization has in order to visualize the scarcity that necessitates prioritization.
  • How to use statistical analysis tools for understanding the size of large initiatives.
  • How to frame experimental discovery using the DIBB model (Data, Insights, Beliefs, Bets)

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Adam Yuret

Adam Yuret

Founder/Consultant, Context Driven Agility
Adam Yuret is an experienced systems thinker who has consulted small non-profits and fortune 100 clients on adopting context-driven systems to solving difficult problems. Adam started Context Driven Agility in 2010 to share his passion for humanistic flow-based systems full time... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
F3

3:45pm EDT

There is such a thing as too much customer feedback (and it's killing your MVP!) (Natalie Warnert)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Minimum viable product (MVP) has been defined, redefined, corrupted and morphed into something unrecognizable. Its definition changes by the moment, product, feature, team etc. The problem of user validation coming too late still exists, but another problem of too MUCH user feedback has emerged. When we focus on feedback that is overly specific, our MVP loses its intentional vagueness and ability to be generic across a similar user base. That is, we develop a product for a specific user or customer and the investment does not expand as easily to other users as the product scales, effectively nullifying much of our investment dollars and knowledge.
In this talk, Natalie shows real world examples of how she has seen MVP feedback used and abused across multiple large retail products and features. She describes key strategies to shift the traditional way of thinking to a leaner model while preserving options for delivery through “just enough” user feedback, and how to self-correct if feedback and product development becomes too centered on an overly-specific need.

Learning Outcomes:
  • -Focus on user learning and validation before too much investment is made by using MVP concepts
  • -Balance early and specific user feedback while keeping the MVP generic enough so its investment does not exceed its useful life
  • -Learn to truly embrace failing fast and pivoting
  • -Identify consequences of not validating products and features early enough in the process and destroying design options

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Natalie Warnert

Natalie Warnert

Sr Agile Consultant, Natalie Warnert LLC
Natalie Warnert is the primary founder of the Women in Agile initiative, which enables, empowers, and expands the distribution of new and diverse ideas in the agile and technology communities worldwide. She is a frequent speaker on business and agile topics including product strategy... Read More →



Thursday August 10, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
H2

3:45pm EDT

The First Five Stories (Rob Gordick)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Whether starting a new greenfield product or blowing the dust off an old legacy app, in order to maximize delivered value, you need to be mindful of the first set of stories to deliver.
Together, we will discuss the power of critical technical stories to help you iterate faster, earlier. How do you know your ideas for your new software experience is really delivering value? How do you handle a botched deployment to your customers early in your development? What allows you to fail safely and recover? These questions and more will be addressed as we explore ways to shorten the cycle time of building software, gathering metrics, and incorporating our findings into newly delivered capabilities.
Finally, we'll review how new findings, from recently delivered stories, drive further refinements to Lean Canvas assumptions, invalidate or affirm hypotheses, and provide a catalyst to Lean UX and 'learning loops'.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding the impact of key early infrastructure and technical stories
  • Understand accruing value of game changing DevOps capabilities
  • Comprehend Lean-UX software delivery goals
  • Comprehend the importance of fast, automated feedback loops
  • Realize the need for automated metrics gathering and learning to speed up customer feedback

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Rob Gordick

Rob Gordick

Agile CoP Servant Leader, Daugherty Business Solutions
I am an Agile Fellow with Daugherty Business Solutions, a professional services company bringing a fresh approach to collaboration for Fortune 100 organizations and solving some of their most pressing business challenges. Over the past 23 years, I have worked with individuals and... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
F4

3:45pm EDT

Prepare Your Software Development for 2020 (Israel Gat)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Chances are your company will not make real money in 2017 on the Internet of Things (IoT) and Machine Learning. However, come 2020 your software development process is unlikely to be of much value to the business unless you develop deep expertise in these two areas, both personally and institutionally. Nascent that these two areas are, the time to start investing in them is now.
This presentation will explore the what’s, why’s and how’s of the forthcoming transformation. It will show how the Internet of Things, with more than 20B devices connected to it, will obsolete the way business insights, models and paradigm are derived nowadays. Instead of human brainpower amplified by the wisdom of crowds, machine learning will become the primary way to discover hidden patterns, and, up to a point, to devise and implement strategies to exploit them.
Whether you are a stakeholder, program manager, architect, product owner, business analyst, designer, developer or tester, you will need to significantly amplify your skills in order to engage and generate value in this kind of Zettabyte-scale environment. The evolving blueprint for so doing, including illustrations from various pioneers that are starting to move ahead along these lines, will be presented with special emphasis on how automated insight generation begets innovation.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Grasp the emergent realities of Zettabyte-scale Big Data that will inevitably come with the Internet of Things
  • Understand why our ability to analyze such amounts of data and and act on them lags behind our ability to collect, curate and manage the data
  • Understand the fundamental difference between human insights and automated insight generation
  • Learn how to use automated insight generation to capture value up-front in Lean-Agile processes
  • Find out which new skills you will need to develop in order to successfully engage in collaborative problem solving in 2020, and beyond

Attachments:

Speakers
IG

Israel Gat

Independent Software & IT Consultant, The Agile Executive
Dr. Israel Gat is an independent software and IT consultant specializing in large scale end-to-end engagements. He is recognized as the architect of the agile transformation at BMC Software where, under his leadership, Scrum users increased from zero to 1,000, resulting in nearly... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
I4

3:45pm EDT

Evolving Agile Leadership at Riot Games. A Story of Challenging Convention (Ahmed Sidky)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Agile Leadership is a broadly-defined buzz-word today. Does it just mean servant leadership or is there more? How does Agile leadership fit with "Agile" Management. While the industry is figuring out all this, at Riot Games, we didn't really care about terminology and definitions, but rather our focus is on building strong human-centric leaders to lead our 2500-person agile organization. Through these efforts, I think we have created our own understanding of what Leadership in an Agile organization looks like that is worth sharing.
 
In this talk, Ahmed will share his reflections on the domain of Agile Leadership in general and share the frameworks and current ways of thinking about leadership at Riot Games. He will highlight some areas where he disagrees with common agile rhetoric like "having single wringable necks" and using "commanding" stances. He will introduce a new leadership roles & responsibilities framework that provides teams a way to balance between team-level autonomy, organizational-wide alignment and strong accountability. 

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will be able to reflect if they have an appropriate agile leadership model for their environment
  • Participants will be able to distinguish between leadership accountability and responsibility in an agile environment
  • Participants will be exposed to a creative leadership model that was rolled out at Riot Games - showing participants - "the art of the possible".
  • Most importantly participants will leave be able really think what Agile leadership may mean for them personally - on their personal journey.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ahmed Sidky

Ahmed Sidky

Head of Business Agility, Riot Games
Ahmed Sidky, Ph.D. known as Doctor Agile, is a well-known thought-leader in the Agile community. He is currently the Director of Development Management for Riot Games and before that he was a transformation consultant for Fortune 100 companies. He is the co-author of Becoming Agile... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
I3

3:45pm EDT

If you need to start a project, you’ve already failed - #NoProjects (Shane Hastie, Evan Leybourn)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
We propose an end to IT projects, project management & project managers. We propose that the entire project process is flawed from the start for one simple reason. If you need to run a project, you’ve already failed.
By definition, an IT project is a temporary structure to govern and deliver a complex change (such as a new product or platform) into an organisation. However, to be truly competitive, an organisation needs to be able to deliver a continuous stream of change. Managed properly, this negates the need for a project and the associated cost overheads.
This is fundamentally what #noprojects is. The approach, structure, tactics and techniques available to successfully deliver continuous change. At its core, #noprojects is predicated on the alignment of activities to outcomes, measured by value, constrained by guiding principles and supported by continuous delivery technologies.
This presentation will introduce you to #noprojects. You will learn how to define an outcome and create an Outcome Profile. You will also learn how to manage change within the context of an outcome through the Activity Canvas.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Why #noprojects
  • How to define outcomes (rather than outputs) and use this as the key organisational driver of work
  • The structure of an Outcome Profile
  • How to use the Activity Canvas to manage a continuous flow of work
  • How to identify shadow projects

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Evan Leybourn

Evan Leybourn

Founder, Business Agility Institute
Evan is the Founder and CEO of the Business Agility Institute; an international membership body to both champion and support the next-generation of organisations. Companies that are agile, innovative and dynamic - perfectly designed to thrive in today’s unpredictable markets. His... Read More →



Thursday August 10, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
H1

3:45pm EDT

The #NoEstimates Movement (Ryan Ripley)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract: #NoEstimates is a critical look at how estimates are used in the software industry.
When will you deliver that feature? How much will this project cost? Which features can I have in 4 weeks? All reasonable questions that both management and customers want addressed. Traditionally, we’ve used estimates to provide such answer.
The problem: estimates can turn in to commitments, dollars get spent based on misinformation, features end up misaligned with business needs, and all parties involved end up feeling misled and frustrated.
The key question is: Can we still make decisions without traditional estimates?
To answer this question, we will explore how teams can use #NoEstimates thinking to meet the needs of their stakeholders, how to maintain alignment without estimates, and pragmatic way to move the focus from estimates to metrics and measures that enable teams to deliver high quality products that delight their customers.

Learning Outcomes:
  • What are estimates, why we use them, and how they are misused
  • How to maintain alignment with customers and stakeholders without traditional estimates
  • Pragmatic ways to implement #NoEstimates thinking in your organizations

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ryan Ripley

Ryan Ripley

Agile Coach, Uptake
A Professional Scrum Trainer with Scrum.org, Ryan Ripley has experience as a software developer, manager, director, and ScrumMaster at various Fortune 500 companies in the medical device, wholesale, and financial services industries. Ryan is committed to helping teams break the cycle... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm EDT
H3