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Experience Reports [clear filter]
Monday, August 7
 

10:45am

LeSS without Scrum (Yi Lv)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
The usual approach to scale Scrum is to start with one team as pilot then scale. This experience report provides a different approach. We focused on organization design first, without having proper Scrum implementation at team level. We used the main design elements from LeSS, but kept team level less changed. Then, we created demand to help some teams towards self-organization. We used the same approach in two different product units from the same company. The two units represented cases of different sizes, as cases of LeSS and LeSS Huge respectively.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Organization first approach while scaling Scrum
  • Incremental approach to expand domain specialization for more flexibility
  • Transitional path from traditional Team Leader to SM/Coach
  • Enable self-organization across teams via joint Scrum events
  • Enable one PO vs. multiple teams by getting teams on requirement clarification and direct feedback with SMEs and users

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Yi Lv

Yi Lv

Agile Coach, Odd-e
I live in Hangzhou, China. Have a daughter of 8-year old and enjoy spending time with her. Try to be helpful for some people. Practice systems thinking in large-scale Agile adoption.


Monday August 7, 2017 10:45am - 11:15am
Wekiwa 1&2

11:30am

Infusing an Agile Requirements Process in a Large DoD Program (Lymari Castro, Warren Smith)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Unlike commercial Agile practitioners, the Defense sector can rarely restructure their milestones for an Agile approach. The authors show how applying Agile to Systems Engineering (SE) (“Agile SE”) can overcome these constraints. Agile SE is a natural fit within today’s Defense Acquisition Lifecycle, and can therefore bring rapid benefits to one of the largest, most needy areas of development.
This Experience Report presents a case study of a successful Agile SE deployment on a major Defense system. The project used Agile SE to analyze the system requirements and develop requirement backlogs for multiple development teams, in time for the system requirements review (SRR) program milestone. This presentation will dive into the unique adaptation of SCRUM and storyboarding techniques to SE, accomplished with Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) tools, using Systems Modeling Language (SysML) Activity Diagrams and Sequence Diagrams for requirements analysis.
These techniques shook up the organization, and the bumps transforming the culture will be discussed. Ultimately, this approach was embraced and successfully accelerated the SRR milestone by 70%. Topics covered will include the importance and impact of rigid Defense Milestones like the SRR, the characteristics of “Agile SE”, assembling and wrangling the teams, eliminating the review cycle, and the specific Agile MBSE technical storyboard and allocation approaches.
The topics presented in this session are highly applicable to any project that uses a traditional waterfall approach but would like to swiftly adopt Agile in their current Systems Engineering processes. This Experience Report highlights that Agile SE can rapidly inject the benefits of Agile to existing Defense programs, whose IT and system budgets exceed 3x that of than any corporation.
Attendees of this session will learn:
• An overview of the DoD acquisition lifecycle challenges and limitations, and where it could be going
• The characteristics of Agile SE, and its work products
• A real-life case study of how Agile SE teams were assembled, organized and operated
• The MBSE approach, using SysML diagrams for storyboarding and allocation
• How the requirements backlogs were generated and allocated to each development team
The following people can benefit from attending this presentation: Scrum Facilitators or Product Owners, Systems Engineers, Project Engineers, Program Managers, Project Managers, business-capture teams, University Grant applicants, Agile champions, and organization leaders.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • In this presentation we will share the following lessons learned during the implementation of an agile requirement process in a large DoD program:
  • The specific approach used to apply Agile to Systems Engineering.
  • How developing SE work products in a team/scrum environment was highly efficient. Systems Engineering often has the reputation of being ponderous. As the time savings proves, developing SE work products in a team/scrum environment was a highly efficient approach to Systems Engineering.
  • The importance and practice of management to the effort. An effort such as this requires strong, persistent management support to ensure the various stakeholders remain engaged. This included tweaking the team based on team member’s knowledge, participation, etc.
  • The necessary skill set. The skill set of the facilitators was also key to success. These Systems Engineers needed to be part methodologist, part tool jockey, part diplomat and part politician, with an inexhaustible supply of energy during the concentrated effort.
  • Eliminating the review cycle. One major advantage anticipated at the beginning was eliminating the need to review the work products. By having all stakeholders involved in the effort: the end-users, the recipients of the requirements, the customer procuring the system, we demonstrated that this was indeed the case.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Lymari Castro

Lymari Castro

Systems Engineer, DoD
Lymari is a Systems Engineer at DoD. She is an Agile Systems Engineering subject matter expert at her organization. In her 14 years at DoD, she has been the Lead Systems Engineer of a DoD Major Systems Acquisition Program, Technical Director, Lead of the Systems Engineering Development... Read More →
avatar for Warren Smith

Warren Smith

Sr. Principal Systems Engineer, General Dynamics
My passion is vastly increasing Engineering Productivity through Agile Systems Engineering, MBSE and Engineering Re-Use Libraries.Improvements over 300% have been measured using Re-Use libraries and Agile SE using MBSE. Warren B. Smith is a Sr. Principal Systems Engineer at General... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Wekiwa 1&2

2:00pm

Making the Change: Going Agile at the Department of Labor (Joey Spooner)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Going agile in the government is easy to say and hard to do. Teams and individuals prefer to stay apart and work on their own for weeks or months at a time. Documentation can quickly become more important than working software. Addressing the demands brought on by a change in administration, policy, or executive direction requires teams and individuals to start working together in order to succeed in their overall mission.
This lessons learned session will discuss the benefits, challenges, and outcomes when implementing Kanban in a traditional waterfall and silo working environment. Techniques for creating a continuous change towards an agile way of working will be shared. Performance data from a two year Kanban initiative at the Department of Labor will be reviewed and discussed. Participants will walk away with a clear understanding of how Kanban can break down silos, improve the agility of a traditional waterfall and silo focused organization, and noticeably improve performance.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Start simple to support adoption
  • It's easy to overload your process with policies and then fail to respect your process
  • Using games can speed up the adoption
  • Leadership matters in a government or bureaucratic environment
  • Measuring sooner rather than later can really help everyone (especially the team) to see the forest from the trees

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Joey Spooner

Joey Spooner

Kanban Coach and Trainer, TriTech Enterprise Systems
Joey Spooner is an Accredited Kanban Trainer and Kanban Coaching Professional at TriTech Enterprise Systems, Inc. In a 15 year career spanning the communications, insurance, higher education, non-profit, and government sectors, Joey has been a software developer, IT director, strategic... Read More →



Monday August 7, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Wekiwa 1&2

2:45pm

Can you develop avionic products in Agile? (Inbar Oren, Yael Man)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Can you build high assurance systems in Agile? Can you upgrade aircrafts, develop head-mounted devices and design highly complex systems using lean principles?
Many have relegated Agile development to small software teams, but at Elbit we have taken the leap.
This talk will describe the journey we took from a few software teams doing scrum to whole solution lines build some of the world most advanced systems using Lean and Agile principles. We'll describe the challenges we faced in reorganizing around value, changing the roles and responsibilities of leaders and building a new culture of learning and excellence.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • • Agile works to build systems at scale in multidisciplinary teams
  • • Change is hard, for software engineers as well as hardware engineers
  • • Coaching is critical at all levels
  • • Process metrics and short term wins are essential
  • • Cooperation with both the business units and manufacturing is a key element in the success of Lean-Agile in systems
  • • Don’t forget the basics – lean principles
  • • Management support is not enough, management leadership is a must

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Yael Man

Yael Man

Senior Director Lean Engineering, Elbit Systems


Monday August 7, 2017 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Wekiwa 1&2

3:45pm

Drama Geek: How Eating Pretend Ice Cream Made Me a Better Scrum Master (Cass Van Gelder)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Cass Van Gelder admits it: her parents cringed when she told them she was majoring in theatre. "Ugh! You'll never find a job!" her mother cried.
Fast-forward twenty+ years, and not only does she have a job, she has a thriving, fun career at Video Gaming Technologies, Inc. Though not in drama (she does still experience some), she liberally applied her theatrical background and put it to good Agile use!
From planning gigantic theatrical productions on small budgets to acting out difficult conversations, learn how she applied the crazy, fun world of theatre to the wonderful theater of Agile.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Improvisation
  • Project Management
  • Working with a Limited Budget
  • Working with a Limited Timeframe
  • Dealing with Very Different People and Cultures
  • Sympathizing and Empathizing
  • Becoming a Jack-of-All-Trades
  • Hard work
  • Having Difficult Conversations
  • Presentation Skills
  • Doing the Best You Can with What You’ve Got

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Cass Van Gelder

Cass Van Gelder

Scrum Master, CSM, CSP, Video Gaming Technologies, Inc. (VGT)
Cass Van Gelder hails originally from Arkansas - by way of New York, San Francisco, and even Las Vegas, where she worked with Second City, the San Francisco Lyric Opera, and multiple, large theatrical productions, including the first North American performance at the MGM Grand of... Read More →



Monday August 7, 2017 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Wekiwa 1&2

4:30pm

Why Data Can Be Both Detrimental and Invaluable to Change Initiatives (Michael McCalla)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Another movement sweeping through the corporate world with the same steam as Agile is that of Business Intelligence & Big Data. I always gravitated to data and enjoy identifying patterns to tell a story. I am also a passionate Agilist, playing the role of change agent in Agile Transformations. Therefore, my natural inclination has always been to couple the two together to drive change. Unfortunately, the sad truth is this approach has not always lead to the desired outcome.
Like everything else that could be used for good, unfortunately, data can also be leveraged for evil. This paper and talk centers on the power of data and the ability for it to be both detrimental and invaluable to change initiatives. I have learned the hard way that without an environment of safety, experimentation, and short feedback loops, collecting team metrics and insights can actually lead to more harm than good. However, once the prerequisite of safety is established, data no longer becomes your enemy as a change agent, but your ally, and a powerful tool in your Agile coaching toolbox.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • 1. Collecting data in many different forms can be used as another feedback loop in Agile environments.
  • 2. Data can be used to do more harm than good in the early stages of Agile adoption
  • 3. The culture of the organization will drive whether or not it is safe for change agents to introduce team metrics. Without a culture that promotes an environment of safety, trust, and feedback, data will not help the cause.
  • 4. For more mature Agile organizations, data is no longer your enemy as a change agent, but your ally, and a powerful tool in your Agile coaching toolbox.
  • 5. There are many different techniques for collecting data related to teams, it all depends what the organization wants to achieve.
  • 6. Aggregating data points to to tell a meaningful story helps Agile coaches identify coaching needs, continuous improvement opportunities, and investment decisions.

Attachments:

Speakers

Monday August 7, 2017 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Wekiwa 1&2
 
Tuesday, August 8
 

9:00am

The final frontier; Aligning the enterprise's direction and your crew's efforts (Sean Barrett)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Are you confident all your teams are delivering on your corporate strategy? Shortly after deciding to go "All in on Agile" across the entire Vistaprint business unit, we began experimenting with an enterprise-wide Agile release planning tool we call the Enterprise Visibility Room. It is forcing us to finally confront our addiction to working on every good idea we think we've ever had, all at the same time. It motivates us to say no, not yet, and to focus intently on our highest value ideas. Through that intense focus, we align our collective efforts to the core of our strategy, balance our supply and demand and increase the flow of value to our customers.
The Enterprise Visibility Room centers on a single, prioritized, enterprise backlog of strategic outcomes. It requires clear descriptions of value for each and every outcome. It visualizes all teams necessary to deliver that value and where each team is actively working. Five ceremonies embody the formal operation of the Room: prioritization, planning, scrum of scrums stand-ups, demonstrations, and retrospectives, all occurring throughout a quarterly cycle.
Peak inside the journey we have taken, hear the lessons learned, the missteps, and unexpected discoveries. Gather insights into which factors enabled us to take this major step in our enterprise Agile transformation, and imagine what an idea like this could do for your organization.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • We have been working on too many top priorities simultaneously across our organization and it has been slowing down our flow of value delivery.
  • Being clear about where the value lies in a given idea and how we will recognize it has been achieved, creates powerful alignment between idea generators and idea implementers.
  • Functional silos are impeding our ability to execute cross functional work and slowing our flow of value delivery.
  • Using the language and approach of genuine experimentation has proven to be a very successful means of introducing change within our organization by keeping any unknowns in line with the organization's tolerance for risk.
  • Allowing the teams' representatives, the primary participants of the EVR, to own, adapt and reshape the tool and process to their needs fostered rapid creative solutions to long standing coordination difficulties, extreme swarming experimentation and ensured high levels of continuing engagement of the participants.
  • Transparency of enterprise level information led to surprising and unexpected benefits for people and teams across the organization.
  • It requires a significant mind shift for organizational leaders to stop focusing on their area of specialty and instead optimize for the whole of the enterprise.
  • Executing enterprise level work in small increments allows for faster feedback, early value delivery, and regular opportunities to adapt to changing circumstances.
  • A single prioritized enterprise backlog is difficult to create, but a powerful tool for aligning teams across the organization.
  • Executive support and active participation are necessary for coordination at the enterprise level to occur successfully.
  • Not all participating parts of the organization have benefitted equally yet from the Enterprise Visibility Room - there is more to learn and achieve.
  • The timing needs to be right for an effort like this to take root in an organization.
  • A single physical representation of all work across the enterprise created a level of understanding and engagement that previous digital information systems have never achieved.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Sean Barrett

Sean Barrett

Enterprise Agile Coach, Vistaprint
With twenty years of experience in technology, from startups to Financial giants, my Agile journey began in the world of Lean and Kanban. By completing the Emergn Expert Coaching Pathway, my awareness of and passion for the interconnected worlds of Agile, Lean, Business Agility and... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am
Wekiwa 1&2

9:45am

The five mistakes I made when applying Agile and how you can learn from them. (Tiago Palhoto)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Come and see what were the biggest mistakes I made as a Scrum Master while applying Agile principles, their consequences and how I've overcome them! Short iterations by default, not breaking things small enough or lacking of project management are some of the topics covered. Come and learn how you can avoid them!

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • I've understood clearly that is not true that ALL iterations must be short. It all depends on the experience, of the team, client, complexity and size of the project. And whatever you do, don't pipeline your work! It will be so much worse;
  • Just because you may not need project managers, it doesn't mean you don't need project management! Make sure you keep performing those tasks, especially the ones related with radiating information to the stakeholders;
  • Learned how important is to break things small enough, both at story and task level. If you don't, you may be led to think that your iterations are too short, which will make you increase the size of the iteration and consequently, to aggravate your problem;
  • Learned that I need a solid Product Owner: Empowered, available and committed, aligned with the stakeholders. Anything less than that will put you into trouble. And never, but never try to replace your Product Owner by yourself, as you may end up making the wrong calls. this will led to lack of trust from the PO and the stakeholders;
  • Learned how really important is to keep consistent with the type of unit that you use in your estimates. If the team is estimating in ideal days, make sure you have their availability reflected in Ideal days. The same applies for calendar days. Mix them and you'll get into trouble very quickly (delays).

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Tiago Palhoto

Tiago Palhoto

Director, DO IT AGILE


Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:45am - 10:15am
Wekiwa 1&2

10:45am

Sensemaking Applications for Agile: Combining Qualitative & Quantitative Metrics (Daniel Walsh)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Sensemaking is a form of distributed ethnography where people share stories and add layers of meaning by answering questions about their experience. Unlike other research methods, this approach directly links quantitative data to qualitative experiences. The narrative-based approach is particularly powerful in situations that are dynamic, complex, uncertain, and ambiguous.
While there are several variations of sensemaking methods, this experience report is based on a version adopted from David Snowden (Cognitive Edge). The method bridges the gap between qualitative data (e.g. case-studies, focus group interviews, narratives, 'watercooler' chats, rumors) and quantitative data (e.g. large sample surveys, organizational health questionnaires) by linking stories with answers to questions provided by the participants. The combination of stories and question metadata provides a nuanced and holistic perspective that enables leadership teams to identify emergent patterns and trends in behaviors and perceptions. The approach greatly reduces researcher bias because the participant codifies their own experience instead of a research team or natural language processing algorithm. The technique can be used to capture a large number of stories in order to understand emergent patterns and detect troubling weak signals across a large population. After interesting patterns are identified, the stories provide context that inform action plans and interventions.
This paper will focus on the lessons learned from using sensemaking methods to capture user requirements , sensing impediments to Agile adoption, and understand employee engagement (e.g. intrinsic motivation) and retention (i.e. keeping talented people from leaving). The paper will introduce readers to the sensemaking methodology and will also serve as a case study for others interested in using the approach to sense and effect change within a complex adaptive human system.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Framework development lessons: how to constructing effective narrative signifiers, how to test a framework, the power of naming stories
  • Story collection lessons: set journalling, ask for story champions, link with larger purpose, set up feedback loops, make collection part of the job
  • Intervention design lessons: beware of convenience sampling, how to create safe-to-fail interventions, importance of executive sponsorship

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Walsh

Daniel Walsh

Founder & Principal, FiveWhyz
Dan Walsh is a Founder and Principal of nuCognitive and FiveWhyz.com (a Lean and Agile Coaching Collaborative). He has over a decade of expertise in accelerating product development, driving culture change, and transforming organizations. As a recognized leader in Lean Startup, org... Read More →



Tuesday August 8, 2017 10:45am - 11:15am
Wekiwa 1&2

11:30am

Impostor Syndrome: The Flip Side of the Dunning-Kruger Effect (Salvatore Falco)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
In their 1999 paper, "Unskilled and Unaware of It," psychologists David Dunning and Justin Kruger described a phenomenon in which people who lack competence in a domain will nevertheless rate themselves as highly skilled. The phenomenon became known as "the Dunning-Kruger Effect," and most commentary has focused on the inability to recognize incompetence. But Dunning and Kruger also described an inversion of that pattern. Often, highly skilled people will underestimate their ability. In extreme cases, this manifests as "impostor syndrome."
For years, I was among the latter group. In spite of positive feedback from peers and supervisors, I discounted my skill as a Scrum Master. My teams thrived, but I focused on my perceived deficiencies, and constantly feared being exposed as a fraud. In this Experience Report, I will discuss how I came to recognize the problem, and how I learned to accurately assess my abilities.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • • How to solicit valuable feedback
  • • How to listen to, evaluate, and use unsolicited feedback
  • • Building and engaging in a healthy feedback community
  • • How I channeled my over-active inner critic into a constructive feedback mechanism.

Attachments:

Speakers

Tuesday August 8, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Wekiwa 1&2

2:00pm

Bridging Mindsets: Creating the PMI Agile Practice Guide (Mike Griffiths, Johanna Rothman)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
At first glance, the PMI appears a strange partner to work with to create an Agile Practice Guide. Many people see PMI as the source of the plan-driven, big-design-up-front, waterfall-inspired methodology that agile approaches are rebelling against. In truth, the PMI is the source of commonly regarded good practices, which today includes agile approaches.
Since many PMI members were engaged in agile projects and looking for guidance, they turned to the agile community and a partnership with the Agile Alliance was forged to create the new Agile Practice Guide. This experience report describes the recruitment of 7 authors, team formation and development of the new guide since August 2016.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Gaining consensus with experts with differing strongly-held opinions is never easy. It is even harder when everyone is an unpaid volunteer who is also geographically dispersed and time-shifted. Luckily we quickly established some team norms and cadences that for the most part worked for everyone.
  • The next challenge was corralling a group of agile evangelists to work to a largely waterfall plan and heavily front-loaded production timetable. After much squirming by both groups, a hybrid approach was developed that allowed for iterative, incremental development of the first draft of the guide. It also largely satisfied the PMI’s production schedule and review gates. The experience report shares what compromises were made and the hybrid solution.
  • The content and writing styles recommended by the agile authors fundamentally differed from the standards guidelines used by the PMI. We wanted to use a direct, personal writing style using language such as “You may want to consider using X…” but this was contrary to the third person directive style favored by the PMI for its standards.
  • This is a reflection of the PMI’s background being in project environments that can be defined upfront and have a focus on process. In contrast, agile approaches assume more uncertainty and focus more on the people aspects. Fortunately, we prevailed here too and would like to share our struggles and solutions for anyone else who faces conforming to traditional standards.


Speakers
avatar for Johanna Rothman

Johanna Rothman

President, Rothman Consulting
Johanna Rothman, known as the "Pragmatic Manager," provides frank advice for your tough problems. She helps leaders and teams see problems and resolve risks and manage their product development. Johanna was the Agile 2009 conference chair. Johanna is the author of several books... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Wekiwa 1&2

2:45pm

The Thrill is Gone - How to Bring it Back Again (Customers and Trust) (Meg Ward)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
The Thrill Is Gone
Remember those heady days when it seemed like you and your customer walked hand in hand through a field of flowers with everything going right in the world? Maybe you've never had those heady days. Maybe you had them, and then the dark storm clouds of failed deliveries, disagreements on appropriate technology, competitive pressures shrinking your deadlines, etc. have left you and your team feeling that it's you against the world and your relationship with your customer will never be the same again.
I've been there, and I'm here to help. In February 2016, I moved from Developer to Manager of a team who were in their fifth year of a two-year project. To make matters worse, they had another deployment of an equally complex product that needed to happen nearly immediately due to competitive pressures (spoiler alert: we did not hit the deadline the customer wanted).
In this talk, I'll cover tips and tricks to build transparency, and with that transparency, build trust as well as about how to overcome a legacy of distrust and build stronger relationships.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Identifying where the trust has fallen short
  • Tools to increase transparency - delivery cadence, emails, meetings, showcases, etc.
  • How to talk to your customers about potential failures

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Meg Ward

Meg Ward

Associate Director, Development, IHS Markit
I'm a software professional with 17 years in the industry currently managing a team that fluctuates between 12 and 15 people working on a C#/SQL desktop app for the oil and gas industry. In my spare time, I play roller derby, brew beer, and read voraciously (mostly science fiction... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Wekiwa 1&2

3:45pm

CANCELLED: Can a dancing elephant be Agile? - The IBM Agile transformation story! (Phil Abernathy)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
This is the story of how IBM, a 110 year old company with 400,000 people globally, is once again innovating and transforming itself, to keep up with the pace of change, to an Agile way of working.
Why should a large, $80billion dollar global corporation change to Agile? Why did IBM choose Agile? Why not some of the other options like Lean or Lean Six-Sigma and where does Customer focused design fit in?
This is the story of how a 400,000 person company has been transforming itself to an Agile organisation inside out, right across the entire Group including IT, HR, Finance, Marketing, Operations, Product development and Manufacturing. The scale and scope spans technologies from mainframe, to the Cloud, Watson and Cognitive computing to Blockchain and even on to research in areas such as Quantum Computing.
We will outline where we started, what we did and how we went about scaling Agile across such a huge global organisation.
We share our problems and pain, the pitfalls we wish we could have avoided and the successes we have experienced from day one. Now more than two years into the journey the benefits are so astounding that we have even commercialized the approach at the demand of our customers.
We will show you how we need to restructure the core of the organisation, reduce and flatten the leadership and management layers, assess and selected only the best ‘Agile minded’ leaders, trained and coached thousands of people and all this while keeping the organisation and our clients running at full tilt.
We share how we saved hundreds of millions while improving response and cycle times by multiple factors, saw our employee engagement soar and our customer satisfaction rating increase significantly.
Agile is traditionally seen as just a way to do things faster and better, but often not as a method to reduce cost and increase revenue. We will show you how Agile has contributed significantly to these two key business drivers.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Why choose Agile and what are the options
  • How to strategically position Agile at C-suite and board level
  • How to start a large Agile organisational transformation
  • What to do and not to do on the journey of transformation
  • What are the key change resistance tactics you will see and how to best handle them
  • How do you change the organisation structure and leadership culture of a existing organisation
  • How do you turn the ship, how do you make elephants move like a pod of dolphins, where do you start and what are the steps to take.
  • How do you train and coach thousands of people to a new way of working
  • How do you measure success of such transformation
  • How do you mange such a large organisational transformation


Speakers

Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Wekiwa 1&2

4:30pm

Elevate your Changemaking with LEAN + Design for Social Impact (April Jefferson)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Social change is complex and it's often overwhelming to determine how to make a measurable impact. Change makers know the ins and outs of feeling inspired only to lead to failure and burnout. Many activists and nonprofit projects take a waterfall approach or do the big design process up front. Imagine co-creating change differently.
Explore with us how lean-agile empowered design thinking, influenced social impact within Detroit. Discover how you can apply our learnings for your social impact projects. Be prepared to walk away empowered to act on your ideas to impact social good using your professional knowledge around agile, lean, and UX.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • How lean, agile, and UX goes beyond software development and can be leveraged for social issues.
  • How partnering around an idea can rally people to join you in creating an impact.
  • How using empathy and identifying a root cause can create a vision for people to unify around.
  • How collaboration cultivates a path forward with people despite their initial position.
  • How positive coaching is pivotal for engagement and successfully navigating ideas of those impacted.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for April Jefferson

April Jefferson

President and Owner, April Jefferson Corp.
April Jefferson is an Agile transformation consultant and organizational change coach. She is passionate about empowering others to foster social change and uses Agile, Lean, UX, design thinking and open space to create awesome solutions and positive organizational cultures. She helps... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Wekiwa 1&2
 
Wednesday, August 9
 

10:45am

Leading an Agile Team in a Hierarchical Asian culture with Happiness (Alexandre Cuva)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Imagine that you have the mission to open a company in a country whose culture promotes hierarchical respect. Within the family, in school, and through university you are consistently taught from infancy to respect your elders, and never to argue with them.
Ladies and Gentlemen, Welcome to Asia!!! Two years ago, I started upon this adventure to realize my dream, creating a company whose purpose is to promote: flat organizational, emergent leadership, learning motivated, Agile and Lean practices, learning from failure
When we sold our concepts here at the local Universities, the first reactions were surprise and curiosity, with management of other companies telling us it could never be done. We were told that, in Vietnam, strict control was required to make people work and accomplish anything.
This story is that of an Agile offshore setup, created by an Agile Coach. It is a story of fast growth, and near-death, only to come back stronger than before. Our employees have created a high level working culture that helps us not only to survive the hard times but uses the lessons learned to advance even further.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • * Our experience in an offshore environment
  • * The tool that proved to create an awesome innovative culture
  • * How we disrupted the Hierarchical culture
  • * Our experience in Agile/Lean team in a Hierarchical culture

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Alexandre Cuva

Alexandre Cuva

Co-Founder & Agile Coach, Finix Asia
Alexandre Cuva is a passionate agile problem-solver, Scrum, Agile Lean coach from Vietnam, Switzerland, and Italy. Having more than 19 years working experience in the software industry, in the financial, insurance, telecom, outsourcing and government sectors, he coach and trains methods... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 10:45am - 11:15am
Wekiwa 1&2

11:30am

Building Strong Foundations... Underwriting Fannie Mae’s Agile Transformation. (PHILLIP MANKETO, David McMunn)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Over the course of the last two and one-half years, Fannie Mae has worked aggressively to transform itself from a heavily silo’d and firmly entrenched command and control culture, following a gated workflow, with long release cycles, to an Agile organization. Today, Fannie Mae is a more dynamic value oriented organization that is responsive to stakeholders, focused on achieving greater efficiency by enabling fast-feedback loops, as well as using empirical data to optimize mature and persistent agile values and practices.
Within the larger context of the transformation to enterprise agility, this Experience Report will focus on the case for change, Fannie Mae’s journey and the corresponding challenges, benefits and key learnings realized. Our conclusion, while it is important to build bridges with business stakeholders, mature agile teams, leverage automation and embrace the values and principles of the agile manifesto… a successful and longstanding transformation is dependent upon the unrelenting focus on changing the ecosystem supporting the organization’s change at the outset.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • - An agile transformation at the team level optimizes locally and is fragile
  • - An agile transformation at the program level optimizes locally and is also fragile
  • - Rather, the momentum supporting an agile transformation comes from the ecosystem supporting the organization and should be leadership’s focus for change at the outset… focus to late on changing the ecosystem and the transformation will collapse.
  • - Leadership and Management are pivotal change agents required at the outset to change traditional ways of thinking, embedded legacy culture as well as organizational challenges to sustainable transformation.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Phillip Manketo

Phillip Manketo

Senior Agile Consultant, ELIASSEN GROUP
Senior Agile Delivery Leader, Coach and Trainer with long-standing expertise facilitating enterprise transformation for commercial enterprises and federal entities.



Wednesday August 9, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Wekiwa 1&2

2:00pm

Automation test - 20 years after... (Marcelo Walter)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Automating tests is one of the first practices in agile, and one of the biggest leverage that we can have in the development process, as it supports almost all of others.
Why is this not a reality, even among those companies who define themselves as agile?
The difficulties are very similar:
  • Unfriendly frameworks: Existing test frameworks usually address only specific languages, architectures, and type of tests.
  • Non-adherent culture: Implement automated tests is not just add a phase on development cycle. To be successful, we need a mindset change. The system must be driven to test since the conceptual start. And this culture must be accepted and engaged from everyone in the process.
  • Lack of technical support and knowledge: To implement good test scripts, we need a lot of complimentary tools and architectural approaches that is not so easy to truly learn.
  • Too much legacy code: This is one of most common excuse: “We cannot test our system because there is a big legacy involved”.
  • Too much time to run: From some teams that started automating tests, this is another excuse: “Automated tests are good but, as we are growing up, this practice is not sustainable because it spend much time to run all the tests and get feedback”.
  • And so on...
This session will show a way to get over these issues, addressing every issue with real cases of automation test. Our experience comes from almost 20 years working on a legacy, critical, and giant system.
What did work? What didn’t? Where did we have to invest? What about scalability? Is there any shortcut?
It is a long history, that will benefit technical developers, managers and agile enthusiasts, since it shows how attitudes make the difference, when talking about overcoming obstacles and evolving.
In the end, we will show the little answer: - Yes, we still have the first test, written in 1998, and running after every single commit!

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • The problem of scaling automated tests is quite common in large systems. This report addresses this issue with a great success case. Moreover, it is a great story to see how automated testing are fundamental, demystifying the fallacy of complexity and legacy. Moreover, it is a good example of how automated testing is fundamental in order to demystify the fallacy of complexity and legacy.
  • During the presentation, we will answer some questions, such as:
  • How to deal with complex scenarios where the solution depends upon the evolution of a virtual clock?
  • How to improve performance of tests that depends on data population?
  • How to deal with integrated tests and external systems?
  • How much of each kind of test should be implement, considering unit, functional, integrated, and UI?
  • Where could you have the biggest increase of quality?
  • How to obtain a better execution efficiency, considering processing, memory, threads, and order.
  • What about when running on a single machine is not an option?
  • How to scale more and more?
  • What happens if you decide to change the development language along the way?
  • How to deal with intermittent test results?
  • How to handle testing concurrency?
  • How to automate tests with production data, combining performance and production settings?

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Marcelo Walter

Marcelo Walter

Agile Coach, Objective Solutions
I work with agile methodologies since 2001. I have experience in agile at scale using XP, Scrum and kanban. Using agile to solve our own problems. As coach and manager knowing tech aspects, I love automation and indicators to measure the success by numbers. Deep experience in automated... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Wekiwa 1&2

2:45pm

Modernizing Cassini: Approaching Agile After a Decade at Saturn (Andrea Connell)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
NASA’s Cassini mission to Saturn launched in 1997, and has been orbiting the ringed planet continuously since arrival in 2004. Throughout this time, the Mission Sequencing Subsystem team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed software used to design and validate the spacecraft’s science activities. As we learn more about Saturn and plan more daring maneuvers, the software systems need to be updated. These systems were created before modern architecture and development process frameworks were popular, and typical legacy software challenges are heightened in the limited-funding and risk-adverse environment of a flagship planetary mission. This talk will describe our evolution of teamwork, testing strategy, and procedures over the years.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Legacy products with long-running teams can successfully switch to Scrum, but should invest in training for each team member
  • Deep domain knowledge requirements make collaboration difficult
  • If the software architecture doesn’t allow for complete test automation, look for partial automation opportunities and build on them
  • Creating configurable tests at the right level can reduce long-term test maintenance burden
  • Process automation can help to improve throughput in the face of rigid organizational requirements

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Connell

Andrea Connell

Software Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology
Andrea Connell has held many roles in her ten-year technical career, including Software Developer, Database Administrator, Certified ScrumMaster, and Test Engineer. Andrea earned her Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science from the University of Wisconsin - La Crosse and Master’s... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Wekiwa 1&2

3:45pm

Brainwriting: The Team Hack To Generating Better Ideas (Chris Murman)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
If you work in an office, your boss has probably forced you into a brainstorming session or two (or 12). Invented in the 1940s by an advertising executive, the purpose was to solicit a large number of ideas in a short period of time. By putting a collective of creative people in the same room, better concepts should come. Sounds very agile.
However, science has shown several times that brainstorming is a terrible technique. It’s cumbersome due to all of the interdependent activities happening at once. When spending time generating ideas as a group, you often spend more time thinking of others ideas than your own.
Fortunately, a relatively unknown technique is starting to gain popularity called brainwriting. Simply put, brainwriting involves a group generating ideas alone and passing them around the group in short bursts. It's a combination of group and individual interactions. Incorporating it into your team events can produce more diverse ideas and provide a friendlier environment for collaboration. In this session, I will review my experience with them in the past year and leave the audience with some tools to bring brainwriting back to their offices.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Chief amongst this study were the following keys to my experience with this technique:
  • - The fallacy of brainstorming: appealing to the head and the heart of the matter.
  • - Why the right environment matters for generating ideas.
  • - What exactly makes an idea diverse?
  • - A comparison of individual idea generation vs. group idea generation.
  • - A walkthrough of I used brainwriting in some of my team events.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Chris Murman

Chris Murman

Senior Agile Consultant, Solutions IQ
Chris Murman's first job out of college was the weekend sports anchor at an NBC affiliate. If he had only known what was in store!Interestingly enough, he still loves telling the stories of others every day. Each interaction is an opportunity to learn what made you unique, and understand... Read More →



Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Wekiwa 1&2

4:30pm

The Scrum Reboot – This Time with Scrum Values. (Dave West, Richard Gratton)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Like many companies, Intralinks started their Scrum and Agile journey many years ago, but recently have felt that they were not getting the returns on that investment that they expected. Yes, they were using the words, they assigned the roles, they respected and follwed the ceremonies, but their adoption of Scrum had lost that ‘Agile feeling’ and it felt for many that they were going through the motions. It was time for a Scrum and Agile reboot. What did they miss the first time around?
In this presentation hear Richard Gratton VP Product Management of Intralinks and Dave West, CEO and Product Owner Scrum.org describe the journey Intralinks went through and how a reboot can reset priorities regarding what it really means to adopt Scrum. The second time around, it’s not just about the Scrum teams, it’s about the whole organization, and it’s about what it really means to go Agile.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Learning outcomes
  • • How you know you need a reboot – the signs that your Agile adoption is in name only.
  • • Manage the tough sell of persuading management they need to re-invest in their Agile.
  • • Meet in the middle with bottom-up and top-down Scrum value culture shifts.
  • • What a reboot looks like and why it is aways harder than the first time.
  • • The results at Intralinks.


Speakers
avatar for Dave West

Dave West

CEO / Product Owner, Scrum.org
Dave West is the Product Owner and CEO at scrum.org. He is a frequent keynote speaker and is a widely published author of articles, along with his acclaimed book: Head First Object-Oriented Analysis and Design. He led the development of the Rational Unified Process (RUP) and then... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Wekiwa 1&2
 
Thursday, August 10
 

9:00am

Eating my Own Dogfood: From Enterprise Coach to Team Member (Sean Dunn)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
What happens when you take an agile coach and force them to "eat their own dog food"? This is my personal story about transitioning from an enterprise agile coach to a programmer on a team, and what I learned about agile, coaching, and myself in the process.
After two years of coaching teams and executives around the world, I found myself disillusioned by the concept of "coaching" and back as a developer on a team -- for the first time in 15 years. The experience of returning as a programmer was enlightening; it substantially changed my perspective on coaching and agile. Having worn the shoes of a team member, I acquired a new empathy for their world and perspective.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • 00:00 - My life as an "Enterprise Agile Coach", how I started as a coach and my approach to it.
  • 00:10 - Disillusionment. My world falling apart, how a I started to become jaded about coaching.
  • 00:15 - Life on a team -- growing pains, learning to fit in
  • 00:20 - new perspectives
  • 00:25 - looking back, what I would do differently
  • There's are three story arcs that I intend to weave together:
  • * How "walking in the shoes" of a team member is important, perhaps necessary, to gain the perspective and empathy to be an effective coach
  • * How I perceived "coaching" from the "other side", i.e. "inflicting help" and very natural reasons why a team would be resistant to agile (I totally get it now!)
  • * Where are the leaders? Frustrations with "side-channel" agile
  • * Agile really does have "too many meetings"* I get it! I loathed the standup. Totally interrupted my dev flow.
  • * The danger of "inflicted help" agile coaches
  • * Process really isn't all that important.
  • * When it comes to coaching, leaders must lead by example
  • * Effective change comes from within a team
  • * Coaching needs to explore multiple directions (including technical)
  • * Lame retrospectives are a waste. There's the elephant in the room, but we don't talk about it for one reason or another, so we waste an hour of retrospective time painting the bike shed.


Speakers

Thursday August 10, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am
Wekiwa 1&2

9:45am

Founding a Code Bootcamp with Agile (Harold Shinsato)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Montana Code School (MTCS) is a community project that has deliberately used philosophy, ideas, practices, and patterns from the Agile community to teach new programmers to code since it was founded in 2015. This experience report tells its story, of how the local business and entrepreneurial community requested it during an agile meeting process, and how volunteers and non-profits got it launched with support from the University of Montana. MTCS teaches new programmers mostly through immersion in group projects with frequent community interaction that includes visits and presentations from the developers and business leaders in the community, and demonstrations of student project offered to the public. Scrum, TDD, and Mob Programming are some of the most powerful of the agile practices used in classes, though there are many more. As of Spring 2017 MTCS has completed 6 cohorts in two locations and in Montana with three more in progress (both full time and part time). This report will share some of the challenges and benefits in adopting agile techniques, and offer some insights for general education and how this teaching effort helped evolve the author's understanding of agile coaching and enhanced the power and impact of his own consulting practice.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • N/A

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Harold Shinsato

Harold Shinsato

Agile Coach/Dev
Open Space Technology, OpenSpace Agility, Coaching, The Core Protocols, Lean Coffee, Test Driven/Behavior Driven Development, Continuous Integration/Jenkins.


Thursday August 10, 2017 9:45am - 10:15am
Wekiwa 1&2

10:45am

Partnering to Improve Usability (Krystina Edwards)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
Our software team at IHS Markit set out to improve the usability of our engineering applications with the assistance of an in house interaction design group. Initially, we were skeptical of their lengthy design cycles and worried it would clash with our iterative development process. We experimented with developing our own fast prototypes while waiting on the design team and we were convinced we could proceed without their expertise.
Ultimately, we learned a humbling lesson: As subject matter experts we have an instinctive bias that we were injecting into our designs and influencing user test sessions. We realized the value of the design team’s expertise and that by partnering with others to design our software we can achieve better UX outcomes.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • N/A

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Krystina Edwards

Krystina Edwards

Product Owner, IHS Markit



Thursday August 10, 2017 10:45am - 11:15am
Wekiwa 1&2

11:30am

How we grew Mob Programming, preserved culture, and maintained quality (Christopher Lucian)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
I am Chris Lucian, the Director of Software Development at Hunter Industries and this is our story of a small successful team growing from 5 to 30 people in just 1 year. We first had to develop the buy in for Mob Programming across the organization. As we grew we needed to ensure the preservation and guided growth of our culture. In need of a new facility we designed a great working environment. Interviews had to embody the spirit of Mob Programming while still evaluating our candidates in a fair way. Our technical excellence practices needed to continue to be a focus. Our department incorporated a flat department structure in order to distribute management tasks throughout the team. During the entire time we faced challenge after challenge which helped develop our processes in a way that is adaptable and yet facilitated our growth.

Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • N/A

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Lucian

Christopher Lucian

Director of Software Development, Hunter Industries
I'm Chris Lucian, the director of software development at hunter industries and a founder of mob programming. I am passionate about the advancement of machine learning and software craftsmanship. I seek the continuous improvement of myself, my family, my company, and my community... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 11:30am - 12:00pm
Wekiwa 1&2