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Project Program & Portfolio Management [clear filter]
Monday, August 7
 

10:45am

Beyond the Underpants Gnomes: Why Kanban Stalls and How to Restart It (Cheryl Hammond)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
You put up your Big Visible Display. Maybe you even limited WIP, or argu^H^H^H^Htalked about limiting it. Something more was supposed to happen. Why didn't more happen? If your Kanban implementation feels like this...
Phase 1: Collect underpants Phase 2: ? Phase 3: Profit ... you're not alone. The Underpants Gnomes can be a scourge of Kanban. Fortunately, they don't have to have the last word.
In this session, you'll learn how to detect Underpants Gnomes in your organization's Kanban process, and how to combat them. We'll investigate three concrete solutions—by-the-book, and beyond—and fill your toolbox with simple, proven strategies for restarting your Kanban after it stalls.
You're ready for the real Phase 2. Downsize the Underpants Gnomes and let's get started!

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to recognize a stalled Kanban implementation
  • Three specific techniques for restarting stalled Kanban

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Cheryl Hammond

Cheryl Hammond

Delivery Lead, Agile Practice Leadership Enablement, Pivotal
Cheryl Hammond, a.k.a. bsktcase, has a couple decades' experience as a software developer in the private and public sectors. She led her team's successful adoption of Scrum-ban for a mission-critical regulatory compliance project under multi-agency state and federal government oversight... Read More →



Monday August 7, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
F3

2:00pm

The Agile PMO: six things you need to nail (Joshua Arnold)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
What does the PMO actually do in an agile, learning organisation?

The leading vs dragging PMO
In many organisations the PMO tends to be part of the problem rather than part of the solution. They tend to frustrate attempts to improve agility that come from either bottom-up team level adoption of agile and top-down desires to improve organisational agility. A lot of the changes that come from adopting agile have a habit of breaking the mold that the PMO is used to. We tend to see a shift from the left-hand side to the right-hand side of this list:

Less of this, more of that
In 140 characters:
. Plan —> Forecast
Resources —> Teams
Push —> Pull
Reqmnts —> Expmnts
Projects —> Initiatives
Dates —> CostOfDelay
— Joshua J. Arnold (@joshuajames) September 7, 2016
Leading change vs defending status quo
Unless they’ve been hiding under a rock for the last decade or so, the teams already get this. In my experience, senior managers also get it. Although they may not use this language they do understand the need to change the culture. The PMO tends to get stuck in the middle though, defending old-skool, outdated thinking that doesn't fit the new more agile world of software and product development. Often they just don’t know any different and they’re using what they’ve been taught as “best practice”.
The thing is, the PMO, with it’s wider portfolio level view of teams is actually well-positioned to really add value and improve the system as a whole. But maybe they don’t know how they could be helping? Based on many years helping organisations from Maersk Line to Starbucks, public and private sector I'll lay out an informed view of the six things the PMO should be more focused on.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand how the PMO is well-placed to add value in an agile organisation
  • Learn 6 things an Agile PMO needs to nail
  • Advice for agile PMOs: (More of this, less of that)


Speakers
avatar for Joshua Arnold

Joshua Arnold

Engineer, blackswanfarming.com
With a background in fluid mechanics and systems engineering, Joshua has worked for the past decade with various organisations to improve their systems of innovation and delivery. In particular, Joshua has focused on the problem of prioritisation and portfolio management, helping... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
F3

3:45pm

Cost of Delay for Dummies - What's the value of NOT doing work? (Jenny Swan, Joshua Rowell)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
We LOVE math! But don't worry we are fun too! Learn how to quantify your assumptions on the work coming into your organization.
Come learn how to measure and find value on all work. Properly utilizing the Cost of Delay allows us to make better educated choices for what problems are the best to go solve. This also helps address the problem of having more work than we have people or resources. So understanding the cost of "NOT" doing that work becomes even more important.
When we don't do the work, what does that mean? In this workshop, you'll find the cost of delay to a problem. Then, as a group, use that to identify priorities and build an initial roadmap.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand why value is important, and why we should all understand value the same way
  • We will define Cost of Delay and why it can be a useful tool
  • Learn how to measure Value using Cost of Delay
  • How to apply Cost of Delay to any request
  • Calculate a scheduling value using Cost of Delay Divided by Duration (A form of Weighted Shortest Job First)
  • Using the CD3 how to visualize the priority of work and create a roadmap
  • Take home provided scenarios, example formulas, and their subcomponents

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Joshua Rowell

Joshua Rowell

Product Manager, Game Master, Walmart Stores, Inc
With a love of games, I find constant joy in helping others work better together and fighting the dragons of the real world. This leads to removing waste, automating boring tasks, and uncovering complex problems that require creative teams to solve. It also means building great teams... Read More →
avatar for Jenny Swan

Jenny Swan

Agile Coach / Orchestrator, Wal-Mart Stores, Inc
Ha! I love this question - What should people talk to you about? Um - I am an introvert and a high functioning autistic so talking to NEW people is so awkward for me and probably funny/weird for you. I am like Sheldon Cooper on the Big Bang Theory, except for being genius, I... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
I4
 
Tuesday, August 8
 

9:00am

Hands-On Flow Metrics (Peter Kananen)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Delivering valuable software in an Agile project requires healthy flow. However, many experienced Agile teams don't quite understand the nuances of product development flow, and are left without clear answers to the question of why delivery is slower or more irregular than desired. The truth is that all software projects are subject to the mechanics of product development flow, and like the force of gravity, ignorance or denial is always a losing strategy.
In this hands-on session, you will learn about flow metrics by running experiments in a web-based tool, built by the presenter. The system demonstrates the effects of various flow variables on the productivity of a system. You'll get a visual picture of what happens to a process when there's too much work-in-progress, batch sizes are too large, queue times are too long, or a work center has a capacity problem. The experiments run by participants will be aggregated in the session and will be discussed so that trends can be identified and shared.
You'll walk away from the session with increased clarity into the principles of flow mechanics impacting your team's productivity. You'll also learn how to take tactical steps to improve your project by watching and managing flow.

Learning Outcomes:
  • The relationships between cycle time, queue time, batch size, and throughput
  • How to take specific actions to reduce cycle time and increase throughput
  • Articulate the risk of large batch sizes
  • Learn how to optimize flow by setting a utilization strategy for team members
  • Protect their teams from over-commitment by maximizing for throughput, not individual efficiency

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Peter Kananen

Peter Kananen

VP of Project Delivery, Gaslight
Peter Kananen is a Partner and Delivery Manager at Gaslight, an agile software development company that works with everyone from growing San Francisco startups and disruptive education companies to Fortune 500 giants like P&G and Omnicare. Peter spends his days tracking the happiness... Read More →



Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
H3

9:00am

Think Big, Plan Small: How to Use Continual Planning (Johanna Rothman)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Many agile teams attempt to plan for an entire quarter at a time. Something changes—a better product opportunity, or a product development problem—and the quarter’s plan is not just at risk. That plan is now impossible. Instead of quarterly planning, consider continual planning. Continual planning allows a project or a program to use small deliverables to plan for the near future and replan often to deliver the most value.
While you may see benefits in your quarterly planning (working with each other, surfacing interdependencies, and the plan itself), you may find that your requirements change fast—even in the first two weeks. The quarterly plan is now at risk.
When the entire quarter’s plan is at risk, consider your options. You can’t bring everyone back together every two weeks or once a month to replan—that’s too expensive. Instead, create an environment of small continual planning. With continual planning, everyone can see the big picture roadmap and how the deliverables deliver that value. Teams are more likely to deliver small value which allows the planners to replan.
Just as we use cross-functional teams to deliver finished valuable product, we can use a cross-functional Product Owner Value Team (POVT) to use continual planning. The POVT contains these people:
  • The Product Managers, the people who develop and refine product strategy and product roadmaps, and
  • The Product Owners, the people who work with the teams to develop and refine product backlogs and stories.
With the help of agile roadmaps, the planners can think big and plan small, over and over again.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to create rolling wave, deliverable-based roadmaps
  • Who makes which kinds of decisions: introducing the PO Value Team and who might decide what and when.
  • How to use rolling wave deliverable-based planning to improve planning and delivery
  • What an MVP is and what an MVE is
  • Several questions to help POs think about how little to plan at any one time
  • Several questions to help POs think about how much value to expect
  • Questions about who the roadmap or backlog is for
  • Difference between continuous and continual planning

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Johanna Rothman

Johanna Rothman

President, Rothman Consulting
Johanna Rothman, known as the "Pragmatic Manager," provides frank advice for your tough problems. She helps leaders and teams see problems and resolve risks and manage their product development. Johanna was the Agile 2009 conference chair. Johanna is the author of several books... Read More →



Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
F1

10:45am

Investment Optimization with Active Portfolio Management (Chris Espy, Linda Cook)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
What if there was another way to approach portfolio management, one that enabled you to act decisively and quickly when an opportunity arose? With the traditional governance paradigm, your organization is stuck with choices that might have made sense at the outset but didn’t work out in the marketplace. What if you made your investments based on facts rather than luck? What if you placed smaller bets against the House and could fold before you lost too much and up the ante where it was evident you would win? In short, what if you could be Agile in where and when you put your money? That’s the beauty of Active Portfolio Management: it enables you to change with a marketplace constantly in flux.
This workshop acknowledges that Agile contradicts traditional business theory, which leads to ineffectively leveraging what Agile has to offer. Focusing on simple rules for portfolio management, you will learn language about Agile that resonates with executives. To help you activate key concepts in this talk, you will run portfolio optimization activities with time for discussion.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Communicate Agile business value
  • Framework for implementing Agile Portfolio Management
  • Techniques for maximising business investments
  • Simple”rules” for Agile Portfolio Management
  • Practice adjusting plans based on changing business needs

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Linda Cook

Linda Cook

Chief Learning Officer, Project Cooks, LLC
Linda is a recognized technology leader and Agile Transformation expert. She is committed to helping organizations achieve their strategic goals. With over 21 years of experience as an IT executive, Linda offers a unique blend of leadership, innovation, and vision which allows her... Read More →
avatar for Chris Espy

Chris Espy

SolutionsIQ, SolutionsIQ
Chris Espy is a Senior Agile Consultant at SolutionsIQ. He has 28 years in IT product development with 10 years in helping companies adopt better ways of working. Chris is passionate about helping organizations and teams build a continuous improvement culture to effectively and efficiently... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
I4

10:45am

Portfolio Management In An Agile World (Rick Austin)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
When organizations move to agile for software delivery, there is often tension with traditional portfolio management. This talk will illustrate how an organization can move from traditional portfolio management approaches to one that embraces agile software delivery. Doing so enables organizations to become predictable, improve the flow of value delivered, and pivot more quickly if necessary.
We will demonstrate the use of governance that allows a more adaptive portfolio management approach. We will cover topics that enable agile portfolio management including:
  • Lean techniques for managing flow
  • Effective prioritization techniques
  • Long range road-mapping
  • Demand management and planning
  • Progressively elaborated business cases
  • Validation of outcomes
  • Support for audit and compliance needs
These topics will be illustrated by real-world examples of portfolio management that have been proven over the last five years with a wide range of clients.

Learning Outcomes:
  • * An understanding of how portfolio management can work in an agile software delivery organization
  • * What metrics are relevant in managing flow of value
  • * How to create lightweight business cases
  • * Prioritization using weighted shortest job
  • * How to determine an organization's capacity
  • * How to accommodate the needs of audit, compliance, and architectural oversight

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Rick Austin

Rick Austin

Enterprise Agile Coach, LeadingAgile, LLC
With over 20 years of software development experience, Rick comes to LeadingAgile as an expert in the financial services industry. Rick has worked for such companies as Antipori Software, Integrated Benefit Systems, Fiserv, and Turner Broadcasting. He has experience in applying agile... Read More →



Tuesday August 8, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Wekiwa 6

2:00pm

Solving the PMO Paradox (Jesse Fewell, Kim Brainard)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
For many organizations, the Project/Program Management Office (PMO) is a very large rock on the road to agility. On one hand, the PMO in many organizations is the primary advocate of a centralized uniform process-oriented mindset approach to work. On the other hand, the same group often wields both an interest in agile methods and the organizational influence to push it forward. Meanwhile, many agile advocates speak of humanized work and then ironically delight in the failure and frustration of PMO co-workers.
What do we do? Can our advocacy for people over process also reach the people who advocate for process? How do we move from good guys / bad guys to holistic transformation?
In this exploratory workshop, we will address these questions head-on through collaborative dialog. Come with your experiences, and suggestions for involving, transforming, or circumventing the PMO to become more Agile, and we will all leave with insights and actions we can really use.

Learning Outcomes:
  • What are the assumptions that agilists and PMO staff make of each other
  • What are successful approaches for addressing the PMO in an agile environment?
  • What are steps one can take to move forward


Speakers
avatar for Kim Brainard

Kim Brainard

Co-CEO, Radtac U.S.
I LOVE people and enjoy creating positive change in their professional and personal lives. Coaching others to realize their potential and setting them up to achieve results is a win for everyone. Having the opportunity to train and teach others to learn is a gift and inspires me each... Read More →
avatar for Jesse Fewell

Jesse Fewell

Agile Coach & Trainer, JesseFewell.com
Jesse Fewell is a writer, coach, and trainer in the world of management and innovation. From Boston to Bangalore, he's helped startups and conglomerates alike catapult to breakthrough results. His adventures are written down in "Can You Hear Me Now", his handbook for remote teams... Read More →


Tuesday August 8, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
H1

3:45pm

Delivering Compelling Products through Progressive Portfolio Refinement (Jorgen Hesselberg)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
At Intel, we are faced with some hairy challenges: how do we create a clear line of sight from the highest levels of strategic vision to a concrete expression of a feature? How do we effectively prioritize work across the portfolio so we can allocate resources appropriately? And how do we make the voice of the customer come alive in the backlog to deliver more compelling products?
Our approach has been to progressively refine strategic value through a set of interactive, light-weight workshops translating executive intent into concrete work. By including a cross-functional set of executives at the start, defining an economic framework, identifying the job to be done and facilitating more conversations and interactions at different levels of the organization, we've been able to spend less time on non-value added activities and more time on product development. Along the way, we were able to reduce organizational WIP, understand what's really important to our business and ultimately create a more engaged organization.
This talk takes you through a step-by-step overview of how we got to where we are now. We'll illustrate the problems we were faced with, show how progressive refinement across our portfolio helped us solve them and demonstrate the benefits we gained as a result. We'll also be transparent about our challenges and show you some of the efforts that didn't work.
At the end of this talk, you'll be familiar with a set of tools and practices that will help your organization align strategy with execution. You'll do more of the things that matter and less of the things that don't. Albeit not a silver bullet, an intentional approach to progressive portfolio refinement supports business agility across the enterprise.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - Learn how a Fortune 500 company created end-to-end visibility of value delivery, from concept-to-cash
  • - Understand how we defined an economic framework from which to make trade-offs
  • - Recognizing that involvement and collaboration from all groups is necessary to create end value, including Sales, Marketing, Operations, Finance and Support
  • - See how we created frequent feedback loops to generate inspect & adapt opportunities
  • - Be relentless regarding removing waste so we can spend less time on non-value added activities, more time on product development

Attachments:


Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
I4

3:45pm

One Metric to Rule Them All: Effectively Measure Your Teams Without Subjugating Them (Cheryl Hammond)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
If you don't know how to measure what you want, you'll end up wanting what you can measure. Most often the thing you want to know isn't easily quantifiable, and common proxy metrics are usually poorly correlated with the information you actually need. Measuring the wrong things is worse than nothing—a toxic metric can damage your teams' performance.
With the right data, you can change the conversation. Tell your team's authentic story to management, your customers, and beyond. Step away from dangerous metrics that punish unfairly. Quit wasting time with metrics that are easily gamed. Instead, choose effective metrics to get everyone on the same page about what's important.
Whether you're the measurer or the measuree, in this session, you'll learn not just which metrics work, but why and how. Our examples will focus mainly on team, project, and program metrics, with theoretical guidance to inform all kinds of measures including portfolio and organization. Understand the difference between true metrics and proxy metrics, and good proxies and evil ones. Discover a framework for evaluating any metric, a Hall of Shame covering some of the worst most popular benchmarks, and one true guide to point you to the very best metrics of all. See some great examples of visualization that make metrics sing, and leave with several concrete measures you can begin tracking as soon as you get back to your desk.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Difference between true and proxy metrics
  • Characteristics of good metrics
  • Examples of common bad metrics and why you should stop using them
  • Great metrics, including counterintuitive ones, that correlate to the performance you want to influence
  • Some examples of measurements where qualitative, not quantitative, works best

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Cheryl Hammond

Cheryl Hammond

Delivery Lead, Agile Practice Leadership Enablement, Pivotal
Cheryl Hammond, a.k.a. bsktcase, has a couple decades' experience as a software developer in the private and public sectors. She led her team's successful adoption of Scrum-ban for a mission-critical regulatory compliance project under multi-agency state and federal government oversight... Read More →



Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
H1
 
Wednesday, August 9
 

10:45am

Finding the First Slice (Richard Lawrence)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
Many Agile practitioners are comfortable working iteratively in small slices once there's a basic foundation, but they struggle with where to start on a new project, product, or other big idea. What if Iteration 0 didn't need to exist? What if you could work iteratively from the beginning?
Agile For All clients have been able to successfully find small first slices for all kinds of software products, for combined software and hardware systems, and even beyond software in such areas as park construction and office remodeling. In many cases, projects with apparently significant up-front infrastructure requirements were able to ship a valuable slice to customers after just one or two sprints. Participants in this session will learn how to use Richard's Feature Mining technique to find early slices of any big idea that provide value, learning, and risk-mitigation.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Use Feature Mining to find an early slice of a big idea to get quick value, learning, and/or risk mitigation
  • Understand how to bring Feature Mining back to your team
  • Explain how different roles (PO, UX, developers, testers, etc.) are critical to effective slicing and how each contributes in Feature Mining

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Richard Lawrence

Richard Lawrence

Trainer & Coach, Agile For All



Wednesday August 9, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
F3

10:45am

One Portfolio Progress Report across All Project Types - It Can be Done! (Geri Winters)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
In many companies (especially large ones) there is a need to have one report showing the progress of all projects in a portfolio. These progress reports are typically based on phases because that is traditionally how projects were run and reported. But phase-based metrics are not a good fit for all projects. Many methodologies (such as Scrum and Kanban) are based on outcomes and not phases.
Instead of forcing all teams to create artificial phases to report against, we can look at a different approach to metrics that will allow each kind of project or implementation team to track progress in a meaningful way for them and yet roll-up into one view of progress for the portfolio.
During this talk, we will review different ways of reporting progress at a project level, then will show how to roll that data up into one report of progress for the portfolio. By creating a progress report that is not tied to one specific methodology, we make it possible for any team or project to work in the way that best fits the work and still have a consistent way to report on progress. Finally, we will review methods for using the new progress report to determine which projects may have issues, determine how serious the issues may be, and decide what to do about them.
Example reports and report templates will be available for download to session participants.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the importance of defining and estimating work items for reporting progress
  • Learn about different kinds of scope items and when each is appropriate
  • Learn how to report on progress based on scope items
  • Understand the importance of trends in interpreting results
  • Learn how to interpret the results at the portfolio level

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Geri Winters

Geri Winters

Founder, Wyyzzk, Inc.
I'm all about sharing my knowledge and experience with others. In recent years, my professional work includes mentoring leadership of huge initiatives, sharing my knowledge on a larger scale by writing books and speaking at conferences (see my Amazon author page), and reaching out... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
H1

2:00pm

Portfolio Visualization and Prioritization for Business Agility - Workshop (Bob Payne, George Dinwiddie)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Visual Management has long been a key part of agile and lean. This talk will explore real world examples of visual management systems and discuss the hidden power of visualization and transparency in an enterprise setting. Participants in this interactive workshop will work with examples of team, portfolio and enterprise management walls to understand how the visualizations create context for real decision making. Participants will tour and design/prototype an improvement for the example boards.
Many organizations talk about driving change through transparency and an empowered, informed workforce. A picture can say a thousand words, we will highlight examples of enterprises that have stopped telling and started showing. An agile team is but a piece of a larger value stream. By embedding the team’s visual management system in the context of the Portfolio and Enterprise Wall, the team has the context of what is coming, how it ties to corporate goals and the impact of the working software delivered.
Own the board and let the information do the talking.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Introduction to a variety of real-world visual management tools
  • Ways in which visual management tools inform at all levels: Executive, Management and Development
  • Achieving transparency without micromanagement using visual management
  • Collaboration via conversation and visual management
  • Steering for success through visual management
  • Identifying problems through visual management
  • The power and flexibility of tactile visual management tools

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for George Dinwiddie

George Dinwiddie

Grand Poobah and Jack of All Trades, iDIA Computing, LLC
The promoter of the “Three Amigos” name for collaborative exploration of business requirements, George has worked with others to further the practical application of Behavior Driven Development (BDD). He helps organizations refine their business requirements to produce long-term... Read More →
avatar for Bob Payne

Bob Payne

SVP of Agile Transformation, LitheSpeed
An early adopter of Extreme Programming, Scrum, and SAFe, Bob Payne has worked exclusively as a Lean+Agile Transformation leader since 1999.Bob hosts the Agile Toolkit podcast and has produced over 170 podcasts, recording a variety of industry leaders and Agile practitioners. His... Read More →



Wednesday August 9, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
F1

3:45pm

The Ultimate Agile Mix Tape (Tommy Norman)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
All the major Agile approaches (Scrum, XP, Lean, Kanban) have their own areas of focus and specific practices, but since they all have a common ground of values and principles there is plenty of opportunity to blend them to find the best process for your organization. Some practices may cause friction and even outright conflict with each other, but when you understand the underlying reasons behind them you can better determine which ones will suit your environment and company values. When you start with your end goal in mind and work backwards from there, you can go beyond comparing the practices of different approaches in an effort to find the perfect one and move to aligning to the strengths and areas of focus behind these practices. This session outlines the core strengths and focuses of the major Agile approaches and where the align nicely, somewhat fit together, and conflict. We will cover many real world scenarios of these types of hybrid implementations as well as how they succeeded and failed. Come prepared to share your own goals and stories!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify core strengths and practices or Scrum, XP, Lean, and Kanban,
  • Identify where these approaches align and where the conflict.
  • Identify patterns in your organization that align with different combinations of approaches.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Tommy Norman

Tommy Norman

Vice President of Agile Operations, Acklen Avenue
Tommy Norman is Vice President of Agile Operations for Acklen Avenue where he ensures they develop software based on the principles and practices of Agile. For the past 20 years he has been helping companies create valuable solutions as a CSM, CSP, CEC, PSM 1, SAFe Agilist, and 8... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
H3

3:45pm

When Worlds Collide: When Agile Teams Meet Rigid Organizational Process (Ian Eshelman, Cindy Hembrock)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Is agile stuck at the team level in your organization? Is there hope for a more agile enterprise when finance, project management, and portfolio prioritization processes are so rigid? How can we truly evolve to an agile organization when cost containment gets all the headlines and audits loom?
Mastercard is transforming the way the organization thinks about agile for the enterprise. In this session, we will share the details of our journey to organizational agility at Mastercard - even when team level agility is mixed. We will explain how we spread team level agile into the program and portfolio layers, affecting everything from annual budgets and planning to project estimation and support services. You will learn ways to tackle the rigid discipline of software capitalization without tracking hours. We will discuss how we balanced compliance concerns with the flexibility of agile development.
This session goes beyond the theory. We will dig into the details and and share the opportunities and learnings we've had along the way. Through the lens of technology business management, you will see how to shift the perception of the IT department from being a cost-center to a value driver. Attendees will have the chance to have a dialogue on concrete practices to bridge the traditional rigidity of finance and planning with agile practices.

Learning Outcomes:
  • More effectively track work and effort without the administrative burden of hourly time tracking
  • Relentlessly prioritize initiatives while satisfying the organization’s need to manage in quarterly and annual increments
  • Transition planning conversations from “project cost estimates” to “program value creation”
  • Consistently manage work across teams at very different levels of maturity from agile purists to waterfall traditionalists
  • Show status without hours and hours of powerpoint manipulation (aka making up the story)

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ian Eshelman

Ian Eshelman

SVP Development Services, Mastercard
avatar for Cindy Hembrock

Cindy Hembrock

VP, Dev Services, Mastercard


Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
F3
 
Thursday, August 10
 

9:00am

Agile BA Practices using The Guide to Business Analysis (Joy Beatty, David Bieg)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
As organizations and individuals transition to be more Agile, often they throw existing good business analysis practices out the door and start fresh. Its baffling to us that while one day good practices seem to be working well, the next day, the team is “Agile” and they stop doing all the things that worked before! Participants going through an Agile transformation will leave this workshop with ideas about how to avoid throwing the baby out with the bathwater in their own analysis practices. We’ll guide the workshop using lessons we’ve learned during the development of “The Guide to Business Analysis” which “Includes the Standard for Business Analysis” that will be published by PMI in 2017!
For background, we will briefly share the writing process for the business analysis guide and standard so that we can then apply the same ideas during the workshop activities. The background information will include our Agile approach to the writing, how we ensured Agile was not an afterthought, and some of the constructs we used to handle tailoring business analysis to a variety of life cycles.
The workshop activities will use a friendly, collaborative, and iterative game to identify ways to make existing business analysis practices, processes, techniques, and tools Agile-friendly. We hope you refer to the guide yourself, but if not we think the workshop will help you transition your own organizations and own practices to be more Agile….without throwing all your existing good practices out the door.

Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. A creative approach to thinking about how to transform existing processes for Agile, rather than starting from scratch
  • 2. Common challenges in transforming business analysis to Agile approaches, including vocabulary and role variances
  • 3. Examples of how common business analysis practices, processes, tools, and techniques can be transformed to work in Agile approaches
  • 4. A view into PMI’s “The Guide to Business Analysis” and how it can help your organization be successful with Agile

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for David Bieg

David Bieg

Business Analysis Program Manager, PMI
Dave has 34 years of experience in business including owning two of his own businesses. Dave would love to discuss how he's been contributing to Business Analysis and Agile at PMI. Dave’s corporate experience includes General Electric, Lockheed Martin and Booz Allen, where he served... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
H3

10:45am

Drive Executive Alignment on Agile Priorities at Scale (Stephanie Allen, Chris Coffman)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
In 2009, Don Reinertsen suggested that prioritizing product development based on profitability projections (e.g. ROI) alone is a mistake, yet so many organizations continue to do that now. Perhaps that is because driving stakeholders to agree on the prioritization of development work is difficult under the best of circumstances; add in the support of competing verticals, acquisitions, and a rapidly changing marketplace and alignment can feel almost impossible.
That is the situation that we faced at Rosetta Stone. Thankfully, there is a framework designed to help teams weigh a variety of objective inputs to make effective decisions about the relative priority of work: Weighted Shortest Job First (WSJF).
In this workshop, we will role-play the use of WSJF to gain consensus on the priority of potential development work. After a quick overview, participants will practice collecting inputs from stakeholders and using the weighted shortest job first formulas. Finally, we will present a case study for how we implemented this methodology at Rosetta Stone, with tips for overcoming potential obstacles. This session is great for product owners, managers, scrum masters, dev leads, and anyone trying to balance a complex set of priorities in a resource constrained environment.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the inputs of Weighted Shortest Job First and how to solicit them from stakeholders
  • Use the Weighted Shortest Job First formula to determine the priority of epics and features
  • Identify and overcome obstacles to successful use of the Weighted Shortest Job First method

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Allen

Stephanie Allen

Vice President, Digital Product Management, Pearson
I specialize in the design and development of educational technology products, leading the creation of innovative new programs that incorporate the latest industry advances in order to exceed expectations for learner goal achievement. Talk to me about product management and educational... Read More →
avatar for Chris Coffman

Chris Coffman

Senior Director, Product, Rosetta Stone
I lead the Product Management and Project Management teams at Rosetta Stone. Rosetta Stone’s learning solutions are used by schools, businesses, government organizations and millions of individuals around the world. I'm passionate about helping our customers improve their lives... Read More →



Thursday August 10, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
H4

10:45am

Prioritization – 10 different techniques for optimizing what to start next (Troy Magennis)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
When we choose to do one piece of work, we most often defer something else. What is the impact of that deferred work? Is it costlier than finding the funding for both? The goal of prioritization and ordering is to maximize the return on people, time and cash at hand. This session looks at ten different techniques and discussed how, why and when to use which method.
Depending on circumstances, even the crudest ordering method may be the right one (“my opinion”). For other circumstances, rigorous understanding of the impact of work order on product lifetime profits might be needed. We will discuss how to decide.
Some question answered are –
  • How good is just randomly picking?
  • What if we just focus on a value estimate alone?
  • How does duration and effort change the optimal order?
  • How optimal is the SAFe ordering technique and where it might mislead?
  • If we wanted to be “certain” what is involved?
  • How do dependencies impact our ordering choices?
This session stresses there is no one optimal technique. There are a variety of techniques that balance the effort required for analysis versus the chance of not finding the absolute optimal result. By attending this session, you will have a better idea of how to choose.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Ten different techniques for work order prioritization
  • Pros and cons of the different techniques
  • How to quantify the likelihood and impact of a poor ordering decision
  • How to know what method is the right balance of effort and optimization
  • How to account for backlog dependencies

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Troy Magennis

Troy Magennis

Focused Objective LLC
Troy is an experienced IT executive who has been involved in many leading software organizations over 20 years. Most recently, Troy founded Focused Objective to build and promote risk management tools that simulate and forecast software development projects and portfolios. Technology... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
I1

2:00pm

Impact Mapping - How to Make Value-Driven Prioritization a Reality (Mathias Eifert)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a way to combine quantified business goals, direct traceability from goals to features, surfacing of value assumptions, cause-and-effect analysis, design thinking and visual facilitation in a single approach?
There is! Impact Maps support multiple stakeholders in gaining consensus on which features or actions are most useful to help us achieve an organizational goal. In the process, we agree what needs to be accomplished, create shared understanding of possible solutions, decide which user groups or personas to target first, derive epics/user stories, identify the underlying assumptions that need to be validated using testable hypotheses, and determine leading indicators to get early feedback whether we are moving in the right direction.
In this workshop, we will look at how Impact Maps can help ensure business value, how to build one with a group of stakeholders, and how to get the most out of it. Best of all, you will create your own sample map so you will walk away with hands-on experience!

Learning Outcomes:
  • - Understand how Impact Maps can help with ensuring that Agile projects actually create value.
  • - Get an overview of how to construct an Impact Map with your stakeholders in a structured brainstorming session.
  • - Interpret the map to derive epics/user stories, metrics and testable hypotheses.
  • - Reflect on the presented concepts by building a sample map together with the other attendees

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Mathias Eifert

Mathias Eifert

Lean/Agile Coach and Managing Consultant, Excella
I'm an Agile pragmatists with a strong interest in first principles over specific frameworks. I believe Agile is primarily a way to manage uncertainty and the biggest uncertainty is in figuring out the "right thing" to focus our efforts on, so much of my coaching is around goal-centered... Read More →



Thursday August 10, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
F1

3:45pm

If you need to start a project, you’ve already failed - #NoProjects (Shane Hastie, Evan Leybourn)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
We propose an end to IT projects, project management & project managers. We propose that the entire project process is flawed from the start for one simple reason. If you need to run a project, you’ve already failed.
By definition, an IT project is a temporary structure to govern and deliver a complex change (such as a new product or platform) into an organisation. However, to be truly competitive, an organisation needs to be able to deliver a continuous stream of change. Managed properly, this negates the need for a project and the associated cost overheads.
This is fundamentally what #noprojects is. The approach, structure, tactics and techniques available to successfully deliver continuous change. At its core, #noprojects is predicated on the alignment of activities to outcomes, measured by value, constrained by guiding principles and supported by continuous delivery technologies.
This presentation will introduce you to #noprojects. You will learn how to define an outcome and create an Outcome Profile. You will also learn how to manage change within the context of an outcome through the Activity Canvas.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Why #noprojects
  • How to define outcomes (rather than outputs) and use this as the key organisational driver of work
  • The structure of an Outcome Profile
  • How to use the Activity Canvas to manage a continuous flow of work
  • How to identify shadow projects

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Evan Leybourn

Evan Leybourn

Founder, Business Agility Institute
Evan is the Founder and CEO of the Business Agility Institute; an international membership body to both champion and support the next-generation of organisations. Companies that are agile, innovative and dynamic - perfectly designed to thrive in today’s unpredictable markets. His... Read More →



Thursday August 10, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
H1

3:45pm

The #NoEstimates Movement (Ryan Ripley)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract: #NoEstimates is a critical look at how estimates are used in the software industry.
When will you deliver that feature? How much will this project cost? Which features can I have in 4 weeks? All reasonable questions that both management and customers want addressed. Traditionally, we’ve used estimates to provide such answer.
The problem: estimates can turn in to commitments, dollars get spent based on misinformation, features end up misaligned with business needs, and all parties involved end up feeling misled and frustrated.
The key question is: Can we still make decisions without traditional estimates?
To answer this question, we will explore how teams can use #NoEstimates thinking to meet the needs of their stakeholders, how to maintain alignment without estimates, and pragmatic way to move the focus from estimates to metrics and measures that enable teams to deliver high quality products that delight their customers.

Learning Outcomes:
  • What are estimates, why we use them, and how they are misused
  • How to maintain alignment with customers and stakeholders without traditional estimates
  • Pragmatic ways to implement #NoEstimates thinking in your organizations

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ryan Ripley

Ryan Ripley

Agile Coach, Uptake
A Professional Scrum Trainer with Scrum.org, Ryan Ripley has experience as a software developer, manager, director, and ScrumMaster at various Fortune 500 companies in the medical device, wholesale, and financial services industries. Ryan is committed to helping teams break the cycle... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
H3