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Project Program & Portfolio Management [clear filter]
Monday, August 7
 

10:45am

Beyond the Underpants Gnomes: Why Kanban Stalls and How to Restart It (Cheryl Hammond)
Limited Capacity filling up


Abstract:
You put up your Big Visible Display. Maybe you even limited WIP, or argu^H^H^H^Htalked about limiting it. Something more was supposed to happen. Why didn't more happen? If your Kanban implementation feels like this...
Phase 1: Collect underpants Phase 2: ? Phase 3: Profit ... you're not alone. The Underpants Gnomes can be a scourge of Kanban. Fortunately, they don't have to have the last word.
In this session, you'll learn how to detect Underpants Gnomes in your organization's Kanban process, and how to combat them. We'll investigate three concrete solutions—by-the-book, and beyond—and fill your toolbox with simple, proven strategies for restarting your Kanban after it stalls.
You're ready for the real Phase 2. Downsize the Underpants Gnomes and let's get started!

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to recognize a stalled Kanban implementation
  • Three specific techniques for restarting stalled Kanban

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Cheryl Hammond

Cheryl Hammond

Delivery Lead, Agile Practice Leadership Enablement, Pivotal
Cheryl Hammond, a.k.a. bsktcase, has a couple decades' experience as a software developer in the private and public sectors. She led her team's successful adoption of Scrum-ban for a mission-critical regulatory compliance project under multi-agency state and federal government oversight... Read More →



Monday August 7, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
F3

2:00pm

The Agile PMO: six things you need to nail (Joshua Arnold)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
What does the PMO actually do in an agile, learning organisation?

The leading vs dragging PMO
In many organisations the PMO tends to be part of the problem rather than part of the solution. They tend to frustrate attempts to improve agility that come from either bottom-up team level adoption of agile and top-down desires to improve organisational agility. A lot of the changes that come from adopting agile have a habit of breaking the mold that the PMO is used to. We tend to see a shift from the left-hand side to the right-hand side of this list:

Less of this, more of that
In 140 characters:
. Plan —> Forecast
Resources —> Teams
Push —> Pull
Reqmnts —> Expmnts
Projects —> Initiatives
Dates —> CostOfDelay
— Joshua J. Arnold (@joshuajames) September 7, 2016
Leading change vs defending status quo
Unless they’ve been hiding under a rock for the last decade or so, the teams already get this. In my experience, senior managers also get it. Although they may not use this language they do understand the need to change the culture. The PMO tends to get stuck in the middle though, defending old-skool, outdated thinking that doesn't fit the new more agile world of software and product development. Often they just don’t know any different and they’re using what they’ve been taught as “best practice”.
The thing is, the PMO, with it’s wider portfolio level view of teams is actually well-positioned to really add value and improve the system as a whole. But maybe they don’t know how they could be helping? Based on many years helping organisations from Maersk Line to Starbucks, public and private sector I'll lay out an informed view of the six things the PMO should be more focused on.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand how the PMO is well-placed to add value in an agile organisation
  • Learn 6 things an Agile PMO needs to nail
  • Advice for agile PMOs: (More of this, less of that)


Speakers
avatar for Joshua Arnold

Joshua Arnold

Engineer, blackswanfarming.com
With a background in fluid mechanics and systems engineering, Joshua has worked for the past decade with various organisations to improve their systems of innovation and delivery. In particular, Joshua has focused on the problem of prioritisation and portfolio management, helping... Read More →


Monday August 7, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
F3
 
Tuesday, August 8
 

9:00am

Think Big, Plan Small: How to Use Continual Planning (Johanna Rothman)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Many agile teams attempt to plan for an entire quarter at a time. Something changes—a better product opportunity, or a product development problem—and the quarter’s plan is not just at risk. That plan is now impossible. Instead of quarterly planning, consider continual planning. Continual planning allows a project or a program to use small deliverables to plan for the near future and replan often to deliver the most value.
While you may see benefits in your quarterly planning (working with each other, surfacing interdependencies, and the plan itself), you may find that your requirements change fast—even in the first two weeks. The quarterly plan is now at risk.
When the entire quarter’s plan is at risk, consider your options. You can’t bring everyone back together every two weeks or once a month to replan—that’s too expensive. Instead, create an environment of small continual planning. With continual planning, everyone can see the big picture roadmap and how the deliverables deliver that value. Teams are more likely to deliver small value which allows the planners to replan.
Just as we use cross-functional teams to deliver finished valuable product, we can use a cross-functional Product Owner Value Team (POVT) to use continual planning. The POVT contains these people:
  • The Product Managers, the people who develop and refine product strategy and product roadmaps, and
  • The Product Owners, the people who work with the teams to develop and refine product backlogs and stories.
With the help of agile roadmaps, the planners can think big and plan small, over and over again.

Learning Outcomes:
  • How to create rolling wave, deliverable-based roadmaps
  • Who makes which kinds of decisions: introducing the PO Value Team and who might decide what and when.
  • How to use rolling wave deliverable-based planning to improve planning and delivery
  • What an MVP is and what an MVE is
  • Several questions to help POs think about how little to plan at any one time
  • Several questions to help POs think about how much value to expect
  • Questions about who the roadmap or backlog is for
  • Difference between continuous and continual planning

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Johanna Rothman

Johanna Rothman

President, Rothman Consulting
Johanna Rothman, known as the "Pragmatic Manager," provides frank advice for your tough problems. She helps leaders and teams see problems and resolve risks and manage their product development. Johanna was the Agile 2009 conference chair. Johanna is the author of several books... Read More →



Tuesday August 8, 2017 9:00am - 10:15am
F1

10:45am

Portfolio Management In An Agile World (Rick Austin)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
When organizations move to agile for software delivery, there is often tension with traditional portfolio management. This talk will illustrate how an organization can move from traditional portfolio management approaches to one that embraces agile software delivery. Doing so enables organizations to become predictable, improve the flow of value delivered, and pivot more quickly if necessary.
We will demonstrate the use of governance that allows a more adaptive portfolio management approach. We will cover topics that enable agile portfolio management including:
  • Lean techniques for managing flow
  • Effective prioritization techniques
  • Long range road-mapping
  • Demand management and planning
  • Progressively elaborated business cases
  • Validation of outcomes
  • Support for audit and compliance needs
These topics will be illustrated by real-world examples of portfolio management that have been proven over the last five years with a wide range of clients.

Learning Outcomes:
  • * An understanding of how portfolio management can work in an agile software delivery organization
  • * What metrics are relevant in managing flow of value
  • * How to create lightweight business cases
  • * Prioritization using weighted shortest job
  • * How to determine an organization's capacity
  • * How to accommodate the needs of audit, compliance, and architectural oversight

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Rick Austin

Rick Austin

Enterprise Agile Coach, LeadingAgile, LLC
With over 20 years of software development experience, Rick comes to LeadingAgile as an expert in the financial services industry. Rick has worked for such companies as Antipori Software, Integrated Benefit Systems, Fiserv, and Turner Broadcasting. He has experience in applying agile... Read More →



Tuesday August 8, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Wekiwa 6

3:45pm

Delivering Compelling Products through Progressive Portfolio Refinement (Jorgen Hesselberg)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
At Intel, we are faced with some hairy challenges: how do we create a clear line of sight from the highest levels of strategic vision to a concrete expression of a feature? How do we effectively prioritize work across the portfolio so we can allocate resources appropriately? And how do we make the voice of the customer come alive in the backlog to deliver more compelling products?
Our approach has been to progressively refine strategic value through a set of interactive, light-weight workshops translating executive intent into concrete work. By including a cross-functional set of executives at the start, defining an economic framework, identifying the job to be done and facilitating more conversations and interactions at different levels of the organization, we've been able to spend less time on non-value added activities and more time on product development. Along the way, we were able to reduce organizational WIP, understand what's really important to our business and ultimately create a more engaged organization.
This talk takes you through a step-by-step overview of how we got to where we are now. We'll illustrate the problems we were faced with, show how progressive refinement across our portfolio helped us solve them and demonstrate the benefits we gained as a result. We'll also be transparent about our challenges and show you some of the efforts that didn't work.
At the end of this talk, you'll be familiar with a set of tools and practices that will help your organization align strategy with execution. You'll do more of the things that matter and less of the things that don't. Albeit not a silver bullet, an intentional approach to progressive portfolio refinement supports business agility across the enterprise.

Learning Outcomes:
  • - Learn how a Fortune 500 company created end-to-end visibility of value delivery, from concept-to-cash
  • - Understand how we defined an economic framework from which to make trade-offs
  • - Recognizing that involvement and collaboration from all groups is necessary to create end value, including Sales, Marketing, Operations, Finance and Support
  • - See how we created frequent feedback loops to generate inspect & adapt opportunities
  • - Be relentless regarding removing waste so we can spend less time on non-value added activities, more time on product development

Attachments:


Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
I4

3:45pm

One Metric to Rule Them All: Effectively Measure Your Teams Without Subjugating Them (Cheryl Hammond)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
If you don't know how to measure what you want, you'll end up wanting what you can measure. Most often the thing you want to know isn't easily quantifiable, and common proxy metrics are usually poorly correlated with the information you actually need. Measuring the wrong things is worse than nothing—a toxic metric can damage your teams' performance.
With the right data, you can change the conversation. Tell your team's authentic story to management, your customers, and beyond. Step away from dangerous metrics that punish unfairly. Quit wasting time with metrics that are easily gamed. Instead, choose effective metrics to get everyone on the same page about what's important.
Whether you're the measurer or the measuree, in this session, you'll learn not just which metrics work, but why and how. Our examples will focus mainly on team, project, and program metrics, with theoretical guidance to inform all kinds of measures including portfolio and organization. Understand the difference between true metrics and proxy metrics, and good proxies and evil ones. Discover a framework for evaluating any metric, a Hall of Shame covering some of the worst most popular benchmarks, and one true guide to point you to the very best metrics of all. See some great examples of visualization that make metrics sing, and leave with several concrete measures you can begin tracking as soon as you get back to your desk.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Difference between true and proxy metrics
  • Characteristics of good metrics
  • Examples of common bad metrics and why you should stop using them
  • Great metrics, including counterintuitive ones, that correlate to the performance you want to influence
  • Some examples of measurements where qualitative, not quantitative, works best

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Cheryl Hammond

Cheryl Hammond

Delivery Lead, Agile Practice Leadership Enablement, Pivotal
Cheryl Hammond, a.k.a. bsktcase, has a couple decades' experience as a software developer in the private and public sectors. She led her team's successful adoption of Scrum-ban for a mission-critical regulatory compliance project under multi-agency state and federal government oversight... Read More →



Tuesday August 8, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
H1
 
Wednesday, August 9
 

10:45am

One Portfolio Progress Report across All Project Types - It Can be Done! (Geri Winters)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
In many companies (especially large ones) there is a need to have one report showing the progress of all projects in a portfolio. These progress reports are typically based on phases because that is traditionally how projects were run and reported. But phase-based metrics are not a good fit for all projects. Many methodologies (such as Scrum and Kanban) are based on outcomes and not phases.
Instead of forcing all teams to create artificial phases to report against, we can look at a different approach to metrics that will allow each kind of project or implementation team to track progress in a meaningful way for them and yet roll-up into one view of progress for the portfolio.
During this talk, we will review different ways of reporting progress at a project level, then will show how to roll that data up into one report of progress for the portfolio. By creating a progress report that is not tied to one specific methodology, we make it possible for any team or project to work in the way that best fits the work and still have a consistent way to report on progress. Finally, we will review methods for using the new progress report to determine which projects may have issues, determine how serious the issues may be, and decide what to do about them.
Example reports and report templates will be available for download to session participants.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the importance of defining and estimating work items for reporting progress
  • Learn about different kinds of scope items and when each is appropriate
  • Learn how to report on progress based on scope items
  • Understand the importance of trends in interpreting results
  • Learn how to interpret the results at the portfolio level

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Geri Winters

Geri Winters

Founder, Wyyzzk, Inc.
I'm all about sharing my knowledge and experience with others. In recent years, my professional work includes mentoring leadership of huge initiatives, sharing my knowledge on a larger scale by writing books and speaking at conferences (see my Amazon author page), and reaching out... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
H1

3:45pm

The Ultimate Agile Mix Tape (Tommy Norman)
Limited Capacity seats available


Abstract:
All the major Agile approaches (Scrum, XP, Lean, Kanban) have their own areas of focus and specific practices, but since they all have a common ground of values and principles there is plenty of opportunity to blend them to find the best process for your organization. Some practices may cause friction and even outright conflict with each other, but when you understand the underlying reasons behind them you can better determine which ones will suit your environment and company values. When you start with your end goal in mind and work backwards from there, you can go beyond comparing the practices of different approaches in an effort to find the perfect one and move to aligning to the strengths and areas of focus behind these practices. This session outlines the core strengths and focuses of the major Agile approaches and where the align nicely, somewhat fit together, and conflict. We will cover many real world scenarios of these types of hybrid implementations as well as how they succeeded and failed. Come prepared to share your own goals and stories!

Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify core strengths and practices or Scrum, XP, Lean, and Kanban,
  • Identify where these approaches align and where the conflict.
  • Identify patterns in your organization that align with different combinations of approaches.

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Tommy Norman

Tommy Norman

Vice President of Agile Operations, Acklen Avenue
Tommy Norman is Vice President of Agile Operations for Acklen Avenue where he ensures they develop software based on the principles and practices of Agile. For the past 20 years he has been helping companies create valuable solutions as a CSM, CSP, CEC, PSM 1, SAFe Agilist, and 8... Read More →


Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
H3

3:45pm

When Worlds Collide: When Agile Teams Meet Rigid Organizational Process (Ian Eshelman, Cindy Hembrock)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
Is agile stuck at the team level in your organization? Is there hope for a more agile enterprise when finance, project management, and portfolio prioritization processes are so rigid? How can we truly evolve to an agile organization when cost containment gets all the headlines and audits loom?
Mastercard is transforming the way the organization thinks about agile for the enterprise. In this session, we will share the details of our journey to organizational agility at Mastercard - even when team level agility is mixed. We will explain how we spread team level agile into the program and portfolio layers, affecting everything from annual budgets and planning to project estimation and support services. You will learn ways to tackle the rigid discipline of software capitalization without tracking hours. We will discuss how we balanced compliance concerns with the flexibility of agile development.
This session goes beyond the theory. We will dig into the details and and share the opportunities and learnings we've had along the way. Through the lens of technology business management, you will see how to shift the perception of the IT department from being a cost-center to a value driver. Attendees will have the chance to have a dialogue on concrete practices to bridge the traditional rigidity of finance and planning with agile practices.

Learning Outcomes:
  • More effectively track work and effort without the administrative burden of hourly time tracking
  • Relentlessly prioritize initiatives while satisfying the organization’s need to manage in quarterly and annual increments
  • Transition planning conversations from “project cost estimates” to “program value creation”
  • Consistently manage work across teams at very different levels of maturity from agile purists to waterfall traditionalists
  • Show status without hours and hours of powerpoint manipulation (aka making up the story)

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ian Eshelman

Ian Eshelman

SVP Development Services, Mastercard
avatar for Cindy Hembrock

Cindy Hembrock

VP, Dev Services, Mastercard


Wednesday August 9, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
F3
 
Thursday, August 10
 

10:45am

Prioritization – 10 different techniques for optimizing what to start next (Troy Magennis)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
When we choose to do one piece of work, we most often defer something else. What is the impact of that deferred work? Is it costlier than finding the funding for both? The goal of prioritization and ordering is to maximize the return on people, time and cash at hand. This session looks at ten different techniques and discussed how, why and when to use which method.
Depending on circumstances, even the crudest ordering method may be the right one (“my opinion”). For other circumstances, rigorous understanding of the impact of work order on product lifetime profits might be needed. We will discuss how to decide.
Some question answered are –
  • How good is just randomly picking?
  • What if we just focus on a value estimate alone?
  • How does duration and effort change the optimal order?
  • How optimal is the SAFe ordering technique and where it might mislead?
  • If we wanted to be “certain” what is involved?
  • How do dependencies impact our ordering choices?
This session stresses there is no one optimal technique. There are a variety of techniques that balance the effort required for analysis versus the chance of not finding the absolute optimal result. By attending this session, you will have a better idea of how to choose.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Ten different techniques for work order prioritization
  • Pros and cons of the different techniques
  • How to quantify the likelihood and impact of a poor ordering decision
  • How to know what method is the right balance of effort and optimization
  • How to account for backlog dependencies

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Troy Magennis

Troy Magennis

Focused Objective LLC
Troy is an experienced IT executive who has been involved in many leading software organizations over 20 years. Most recently, Troy founded Focused Objective to build and promote risk management tools that simulate and forecast software development projects and portfolios. Technology... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
I1

3:45pm

If you need to start a project, you’ve already failed - #NoProjects (Shane Hastie, Evan Leybourn)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract:
We propose an end to IT projects, project management & project managers. We propose that the entire project process is flawed from the start for one simple reason. If you need to run a project, you’ve already failed.
By definition, an IT project is a temporary structure to govern and deliver a complex change (such as a new product or platform) into an organisation. However, to be truly competitive, an organisation needs to be able to deliver a continuous stream of change. Managed properly, this negates the need for a project and the associated cost overheads.
This is fundamentally what #noprojects is. The approach, structure, tactics and techniques available to successfully deliver continuous change. At its core, #noprojects is predicated on the alignment of activities to outcomes, measured by value, constrained by guiding principles and supported by continuous delivery technologies.
This presentation will introduce you to #noprojects. You will learn how to define an outcome and create an Outcome Profile. You will also learn how to manage change within the context of an outcome through the Activity Canvas.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Why #noprojects
  • How to define outcomes (rather than outputs) and use this as the key organisational driver of work
  • The structure of an Outcome Profile
  • How to use the Activity Canvas to manage a continuous flow of work
  • How to identify shadow projects

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Evan Leybourn

Evan Leybourn

Founder, Business Agility Institute
Evan is the Founder and CEO of the Business Agility Institute; an international membership body to both champion and support the next-generation of organisations. Companies that are agile, innovative and dynamic - perfectly designed to thrive in today’s unpredictable markets. His... Read More →



Thursday August 10, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
H1

3:45pm

The #NoEstimates Movement (Ryan Ripley)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.


Abstract: #NoEstimates is a critical look at how estimates are used in the software industry.
When will you deliver that feature? How much will this project cost? Which features can I have in 4 weeks? All reasonable questions that both management and customers want addressed. Traditionally, we’ve used estimates to provide such answer.
The problem: estimates can turn in to commitments, dollars get spent based on misinformation, features end up misaligned with business needs, and all parties involved end up feeling misled and frustrated.
The key question is: Can we still make decisions without traditional estimates?
To answer this question, we will explore how teams can use #NoEstimates thinking to meet the needs of their stakeholders, how to maintain alignment without estimates, and pragmatic way to move the focus from estimates to metrics and measures that enable teams to deliver high quality products that delight their customers.

Learning Outcomes:
  • What are estimates, why we use them, and how they are misused
  • How to maintain alignment with customers and stakeholders without traditional estimates
  • Pragmatic ways to implement #NoEstimates thinking in your organizations

Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ryan Ripley

Ryan Ripley

Agile Coach, Uptake
A Professional Scrum Trainer with Scrum.org, Ryan Ripley has experience as a software developer, manager, director, and ScrumMaster at various Fortune 500 companies in the medical device, wholesale, and financial services industries. Ryan is committed to helping teams break the cycle... Read More →


Thursday August 10, 2017 3:45pm - 5:00pm
H3